Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Yahia Zare Mehrjerdi

The purpose of this article to review key points about the radio frequency identification, and productivity enhancement in SCM through the use of radio frequency

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article to review key points about the radio frequency identification, and productivity enhancement in SCM through the use of radio frequency identification. To understand radio frequency key points fundamental on that are identified and reviewed. Some applications of radio frequency identification in supply chain are briefly reviewed and five cases of radio frequency identification implementation in supply chain are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides key elements of radio frequency identification and the integration of supply chain and radio frequency identification for generating new systems with higher level of profitability, efficiency, and productivity.

Findings

To make supply chain system functional and successfully operational manufacturers can use radio frequency identification solutions to reduce operating costs through decreasing the labor costs, claims, and returns. This will help them to increase the operating income. They also can reduce working capital by enabling reductions in inventory and lowering the inventory write‐off from the return goods and those items that are un‐saleable at the end. It is the collection of such strategies that can bring higher level of profitability and productivity to the supply chain.

Practical implications

This sophisticated technology is more useful to the management for one or more of the following facts: better supply chain and inventory management; reducing counterfeiting and fraud controlling; tracking work‐in progress; reducing administrative errors; reducing rework; better management of warrantee claims; capable of working in suitable and harsh environments; better supply chain efficiency; cost saving and profit enhancement.

Originality/value

Due to the fact that a better management of production system is related to the full understanding of the technologies implemented and the system under consideration, sufficient background on the radio frequency identification technology is provided and supply chain management system including profitability and productivity enhancement are discussed.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

David C. Twist

Radio frequency identification or RFID has received much press of late, mainly due to the recent compliance mandates by many of the world’s largest retailers (Wal‐Mart…

Abstract

Radio frequency identification or RFID has received much press of late, mainly due to the recent compliance mandates by many of the world’s largest retailers (Wal‐Mart, Tesco, Marks and Spencer, Target, etc.) and Gillette’s reported purchase of 500 million units last year. The technology has been proclaimed to ‘lead to an entirely new relationship between people and things’ (J. D. Markman, ‘Invest in the Greatest Thing since the Bar Code’, MSN Money ‐ SuperModels, 25th June, 2003; http:// moneycentral.msn.com/content/P50823.asp). Others have said ‘we think it will be bigger than the Internet. All the Web did was connect computers to computers. That’s not as big as connecting things to computers’ (M. Roberti, publisher of RFID Journal, in interview with Markman, above). Promoters describe a supply chain where all assets are in perfect visibility through production, distribution, retail and consumption. According to one analyst, the world will need about half the warehouse space it needs today (P. Jilek, ‘Corporate Sector Focus, A Killer App?’ CSFB Investment Strategy, 17th June, 2003). This paper introduces RFID technology and its potential implications. Although the technology is compelling, there are serious nearterm challenges. Finally, the paper looks at the impact RFID could have on supply chain facilities and the future demand for industrial real estate.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Elisha Ondieki Makori

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in handling and supporting information services and activities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in handling and supporting information services and activities in Kenyan university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a survey research design to collect data, ideas, opinions, views and suggestions from the respondents drawn from various university libraries in Kenya. Collecting data and getting in‐depth information from the respondents was done using a web‐based structured questionnaire, document analysis and participant observation.

Findings

The findings from the study show that few university libraries in Kenya are using radio frequency identification technology to handle and support information services and activities. The study also found various problems hindering the adoption of the technology, such as a lack of information communication technology (ICT) policies, lack of a business approach, limited market opportunities, lack of lobbying or negotiating skills, inadequate funding and budgeting, and lack of ICT competencies and skills. The study recommends that library ICT professionals, information professionals and other stakeholders should make tireless efforts to implement and use RFID technology with the view to building, strengthening, improving and supporting information work and activities in university libraries.

Research limitations/implications

The study involved RFID technology, a relatively new and emerging innovation in university library and information systems, especially in the Kenyan context. The study also involved university libraries in Kenya that provide and support the fundamental functions of their respective universities.

Practical implications

Fundamentally, library ICT professionals, information professionals and other stakeholders need to take appropriate measures to address issues affecting the use of RFID solutions. There is a need to empower university libraries and information professionals with the right mix of ICT knowledge and skills necessary in the modern information environment.

Social implications

Across the world, university libraries are increasingly adopting and implementing RFID solutions in order to handle and support information work and activities. Of critical importance to the discussion is the extent to which university libraries in Kenya are using this technology to handle and support information work and activities effectively and efficiently. Proper management of library operations and services is necessary in university library and information systems.

Originality/value

The focus of the study was to assess the extent to which university libraries in Kenya are adopting and using RFID systems in information work and activities. This research is useful in providing a point of reference for university libraries and information professionals, increasingly going for similar solutions in Kenya and Africa in general.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Yahia Zare Mehrjerdi

This paper aims to propose the idea of developing an automatic Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)‐based system for library search and to examine the existing literature…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose the idea of developing an automatic Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)‐based system for library search and to examine the existing literature to determine whether current technology and developed RFID‐based systems are helpful for building that. To fully understand its key points, adoptions, risks, and benefits, the fundamentals of radio frequency are to be identified and reviewed. Some applications of radio frequency identification in library systems and various industries are to be briefly discussed and four related cases reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies key benefits and risks of radio frequency identification through review of library literature and case studies. For this purpose, four cases are reviewed from the entire industry and then key features of those cases are matched with the requirements of the big pictures' RFID‐based system to determine the current level of the RFID‐based system development.

Findings

To make library systems functional and successfully operational RFID solutions can be used to reduce operating costs through decreasing the labor costs, enhancing automation, improving tracking and tracing, and preventing the loss of materials under any circumstances.

Originality/value

The proposed automated RFID‐based system is a novel idea by itself. Owing to the fact that better management of books and materials becomes possible, materials are not lost, theft is avoided, and patrons are served on time and correctly.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Peter Jones, Colin Clarke‐Hill, Daphne Comfort, David Hillier and Peter Shears

Outlines the characteristics of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and shows the growth of retail interest in the technology’s introduction in the UK…

Abstract

Outlines the characteristics of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and shows the growth of retail interest in the technology’s introduction in the UK. Discusses privacy and public policy issues that are associated with RFID. Concludes that retailers have to address a series of privacy and public liberties, associated with RFID.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Yahia Zare Mehrjerdi

This paper seeks to review the fundamental concepts of radio frequency identification (RFID) and to discuss the fact that the road to success for healthcare systems is the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the fundamental concepts of radio frequency identification (RFID) and to discuss the fact that the road to success for healthcare systems is the thorough management of patients, employees, equipment, medications, and records throughout the industry. Thereafter, it aims to prepare a deep review of the technology, study seven new cases on the topic of healthcare management and deliver a broad applications area thereof.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies key elements of RFID through the review of healthcare management literature and case studies. For this purpose, seven cases from the healthcare industry are reviewed to demonstrate the extent of the applications of RFID in this area.

Findings

To make healthcare management systems functional and successfully operational, RFID solutions can be used to reduce operating costs through management of patients, employees, equipment, medications, and records to improve tracking and tracing, and preventing the lost of resources under any circumstances.

Originality/value

This paper delivers a review of RFID on the healthcare industry. For this reason, the basic and key point on RFID technology is discussed and seven cases from the literature are reviewed.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Alan D. Smith

To provide practitioners of management a sense of the importance of strategically leveraging the current and historic development of radio frequency identification (RFID

Abstract

Purpose

To provide practitioners of management a sense of the importance of strategically leveraging the current and historic development of radio frequency identification (RFID) in order to find inexpensive applications of radio frequency‐based (RF) technologies in many areas.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the applied literature on RFID, as well as from practical experience, resulted in a basic model of viewpoint to understand the nature of the emergent RF‐based industry.

Findings

Wal‐Mart and other cost sensitive and value chain progressive companies' usage of RFID‐based technology should revolutionize the method that companies' track inventory. However, some of the disadvantages include costs, training, product label and supplies, and privacy infringement. One asset to companies like Wal‐Mart is pallet tracking because it improves on‐time inventory delivery. This helps Wal‐Mart since they rely on just‐in‐time ordering.

Research limitations/implications

RFID is currently used in many industries such as transportation and distribution, manufacturing and processing, and security and law enforcement. The advantages RFID gives to companies are the following: enhanced record management, customer behavior patterns, and accurate inventory tracking.

Practical implications

This paper describes RFID and its implementation process in an academic manner, some disadvantages of RFID, and examples of how the technology can improve customer relationship management (CRM) are discussed. Originality/value – This form of identification can be used in large stores like Wal‐Mart to receive real time information. By implementing RFID, companies will create a fully integrated supply chain system. Traditionally, many supply chain management (SCM) research has simply viewed RF‐based technology as a technological innovation, not a transformational event as this paper presents.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2007

Kevin Curran and Martin Porter

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a location determination technology that has been receiving a lot of commercial attention in recent times, especially in the areas…

Abstract

Purpose

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a location determination technology that has been receiving a lot of commercial attention in recent times, especially in the areas of asset tracking and supply chain management. The purpose of this paper is to outline a library prototype that utilises RFID in order to enhance and speed up the current customer book search and identification processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The hardware to be used in the design and implementation of the prototypes include a laptop to host the server, a router to create the wireless network, a PDA to host the applications, RFID tags and an RFID reader to carry out the RFID communication.

Findings

The functionality and benefits offered by the RFID systems match the needs and areas of improvement for libraries. RFID technology can help streamline major library processes such as stocktaking and book searches. Already approximately 8 per cent of libraries worldwide are using RFID, and it will be incorporated into many items libraries purchase in the future. The development and evaluation of the Library Application has demonstrated that RFID can be successfully integrated into library systems.

Practical implications

RFID systems can be integrated into existing library systems to improve the efficiency of the main processes carried out in any library and increase the quality of services provided. The ability of RFID to uniquely identify every item is very suitable for libraries.

Originality/value

Presents an RFID enabled library system to aid in the speed of identifying and finding books for the customer.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Paul G. Ranky

This paper aims to introduce some of the most important engineering, and information systems management principles and challenges, that radio frequency identification (RFID

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce some of the most important engineering, and information systems management principles and challenges, that radio frequency identification (RFID) researchers, implementers and users should keep in mind when developing such systems, and/or planning for such applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a general review of RFID systems.

Findings

RFID technologies with the appropriate IT infrastructure help both major distributors and manufacturers, as well as other logistics operations, such as the health‐care system, defense industries, and others, dealing with complex, global supply chains in which products and product shipments must be traced and identified in a non‐contact, wireless fashion using a computer network, because of cost, or security, or safety, or because parts are subject to corrosion, or food/medicine is subject to quality degradation, or other reasons. All of these requirements point to an automated, wireless‐readable sensory‐based identification method, and network, that offers more functionalities and is significantly “smarter” than the well known bar code or the unified product code. RFIDs are available as passive and/or active radio read/write sensor‐packages with active read (and often write) capabilities in relatively large areas (like a large distribution centre warehouse, or a containership), all performed automatically, supervised by computers and communicated in a wireless fashion over secure intranets. RFID represents great research, technology, as well as huge business opportunities.

Practical implications

RFID has the potential to change the way we do business all around the world. It is a huge challenge, not just because of the sophisticated sensor‐network technology, but also because of the vast systems integration and IT tasks ahead of us.

Originality/value

Reviews the current state‐of‐the‐art and future opportunities.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2011

Martin Zimerman

The purpose of this paper is to show that there may currently be more motivation to move towards a modern RFID system for libraries

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that there may currently be more motivation to move towards a modern RFID system for libraries

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

The author finds that prices for RFID chips and equipment have dropped significantly.

Practical implications]

In these harsh economic times libraries need to use purchasing funds wisely. RFID is a method of accomplishing more, possibly for less money.

Originality/value

With more personnel being laid off every day, libraries need to be innovative in using technology, and cost‐effective. RFID, once set up, can place the burden of cataloging, circulation and collection management on the computer rather than on staff.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000