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Book part

Clóvis Reis

This research analyzes how ad formats are incorporated into the structure of radio programming and provides a scheme for classifying advertisements in light of the overall…

Abstract

This research analyzes how ad formats are incorporated into the structure of radio programming and provides a scheme for classifying advertisements in light of the overall organization of the radio programming schedule.

This chapter consists of three parts. The first part presents the main ad formats aired on the radio. The second discusses the challenges for classifying ad formats based on the characteristics usually employed in most studies. Finally, the third part of the chapter proposes a new taxonomic basis for the classification of radio advertising. Scholars from Spain and the United States provide the theoretical framework that serves as a main foundation for this work. However, Brazilian data forms the empirical basis for the classification of the ad formats in this research.

The approach moves the description of ad formats from an individual definition of each type of announcement – the ad formats – toward a broad analysis of radio advertisements, which groups the set of compositions in ad meta formats. The meta formats are distinguishable by the distribution mode or insertion mode of the ads in the radio programming.

The chapter presents an original taxonomy, which allows the development of a general framework regarding the advertising typology aired on the radio.

Future research could use this taxonomy to attend to the new landscape created by the changing electronic media and its influence on the analog radio programming.

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Article

Eleanor S. Block

Many individuals experience a sense of déjà vu when smelling a particular scent in the air or on hearing a name or words from the past. At times even the faintest scent or…

Abstract

Many individuals experience a sense of déjà vu when smelling a particular scent in the air or on hearing a name or words from the past. At times even the faintest scent or sound may evoke old memories and stir the senses. This is particularly true when the names of long‐ago television and radio programs are heard. Depending on one's age and the part of the country in which one lived, people born before the “baby boom” years (1946–1964) often feel a profound sense of nostalgia about such radio programs as Mr. District Attorney and Fibber McGee and Molly or the television shows Howdy Doody and Toast of the Town/Ed Sullivan Show. These early programs are considered part of the “golden age” of radio and television broadcasting.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Joseph P. Vaccaro and W.W. Kassaye

Provides an examination of the importance of barter in the radio industry based on a systematic random sample of 195 radio stations within the continental USA. Describes…

Abstract

Provides an examination of the importance of barter in the radio industry based on a systematic random sample of 195 radio stations within the continental USA. Describes how data were collected to assess the prevalence of barter in the industry. Analyzes the managerial decisions pertaining to barter to provide basic understanding of barter programming and its role in the station manager’s strategic planning. Concludes that station managers are using barter more and more to reinforce their product offerings and reduce the squeeze on cash flow. Providing programming that hits the right people continues to be a challenge for station managers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Case study

Anand Kumar Jaiswal, Harit Palan, Prashant Panday, Nandan Srinath, Tapas Sen and Srinivasa Shenoy

The case describes how Radio Mirchi dealt with competition in the Bangalore FM radio market. Radio Mirchi's market share in Bangalore started declining within a few months…

Abstract

The case describes how Radio Mirchi dealt with competition in the Bangalore FM radio market. Radio Mirchi's market share in Bangalore started declining within a few months of its successful launch, following the entry of new competitors in the market. The case discusses strategies adopted by the company to regain its market share and become the market leader. It describes the initial product offering of the channel, why it felt the need to redesign its product mix, and eventually how the company changed its product offering. The focus of the case is on the dilemma faced by the organization while shifting to a new product and service design in the face of emerging competition. The case highlights the importance of continuously monitoring the market environment and developing a keen understanding of the consumers' behaviour for an organization to gain and sustain its leadership position in the marketplace.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Book part

Peter Siegelman and Joel Waldfogel

Market provision of radio programming is beset by possible inefficient underprovision of formats that appeal to small audiences, for which the social benefits of…

Abstract

Market provision of radio programming is beset by possible inefficient underprovision of formats that appeal to small audiences, for which the social benefits of programming — but not advertising revenue — exceed their costs. Larger markets have more programming, so their listeners derive benefits from being in the same market as others with similar preferences, a mechanism we term “preference externalities.” Yet, because white and minority content preferences are substantially different, preference externalities are positive only within group. We expect problems of inefficient underprovision to be more likely for small minority populations. We find evidence that policies promoting minority ownership increase the amount of minority-targeted programming.

Details

Advertising and Differentiated Products
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-823-1

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Article

Peter Drinkwater and Mark Uncles

The goal of this paper is to examine how broadcaster brand images are affected by programming decisions.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to examine how broadcaster brand images are affected by programming decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two sets of experiments were undertaken with regular viewers/listeners of TV and radio stations. Subjects were presented with scenarios describing program success (failure) and program congruity (incongruity).

Findings

Results show that perceptions of program brand success (failure) have an enhancement (dilution) effect on broadcaster brand image. Program familiarity intensifies these effects. Results also show that congruity (incongruity) of program brand image produces enhancement (dilution) effects on broadcaster brand image.

Research limitations/implications

Program success and congruity are conceptually and empirically linked to broadcaster branding. Further work is required to examine the drivers of success and congruity.

Practical implications

Results are of direct relevance for those managing broadcaster brands. They need to be aware that perceptions of a broadcaster can be enhanced (diluted) when viewers/listeners are exposed to evidence of (a) successful (unsuccessful) programs and (b) congruous (incongruous) programs. This calls for active management of perceptions of success and congruity.

Originality/value

This is one of only a small number of papers in marketing to focus on the commercially important area of broadcaster branding. It highlights issues that are of significance for broadcasters and for those in communications and entertainment more broadly.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Case study

Anand Kumar Jaiswal and Harit Palan

Radio Mirchi is the flagship brand of Entertainment Network India Limited (ENIL). ENIL is the largest private FM radio broadcaster in India. ENIL was able to gain a…

Abstract

Radio Mirchi is the flagship brand of Entertainment Network India Limited (ENIL). ENIL is the largest private FM radio broadcaster in India. ENIL was able to gain a stronghold in the market due to its strengths of innovativeness and creative content, large operating network, reach among listeners, high quality studio and strong advertisement sales capabilities. The case discusses Radio Mirchi's entry into the Kolkata market in 2003 amidst the competition from three other players—Red FM, Aamar and Power. Kolkata occupied a prime place in the company's growth plans. The case discusses the dilemma faced by the company on developing the entry strategy. Its top management has to decide on the market segment(s) it should target, and the design of the product.

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Article

Vicki Howard

Focusing on the early development of the three major forms of local advertising employed by independent department stores across the USA – newspapers, radio, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on the early development of the three major forms of local advertising employed by independent department stores across the USA – newspapers, radio, and television – this paper examines continuity in the industry's commercial use of new technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on different types of primary sources, including department store financial records and correspondence, retailing trade literature, industry publications, newspaper advertisements, and radio advertisement transcripts.

Findings

The local and regional markets of the independent department store, and to some extent, department store chains, required local advertising, something best served by newspapers in the period under study. While many retailers embrace the commercial potential of radio and television as they appear in the 1920s and late 1930s, respectively, others are reluctant to divert their advertising budget away from newspapers. Trade writers for the department store industry and radio and television reveal tension between the National Retail Dry Goods Association, with its progressive orientation and professionalizing goals, and the more traditional merchants these experts are trying to modernize. The paper also suggests, perhaps as a subject for future research, that as radio and television lost their local orientation and became increasingly commercialized and national, independent department store advertising would not have been able to compete with department store chains.

Originality/value

Although much has been written about national advertising, cultural, and business historians have conducted little research on local advertising, the type typically employed by independent department stores. This paper provides an introduction to the three major advertising formats most often used by independent department stores as each medium first emerged as a potential selling tool.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article

Sailas Nyareza and Archie L. Dick

This paper aims to report an investigation into the benefits and limitations of radio to communicate agricultural information to peasant farmers, and how it can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report an investigation into the benefits and limitations of radio to communicate agricultural information to peasant farmers, and how it can be successfully incorporated into agricultural extension service programs in Zimbabwe.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative research techniques were applied to gather, analyze and interpret data. A total of 25 semi‐structured interviews were conducted with peasant farmers in Ward 16 of the Buhera South Constituency, and four in‐depth interviews were conducted with key informants in agricultural extension and radio services.

Findings

Extension service programs do not satisfy the agricultural information needs of peasant farmers because: there are not enough extension workers; they do not have the means of transport to reach all households; they lack the communication skills to interact effectively with the peasant farmers; and they lack the motivation to carry out their work. A community radio service was the most preferred medium of communication for rural peasant farmers. The farming radio programs are relevant to their agricultural activities, their language and accents are used, and they can contribute to the program content.

Originality/value

The study proposes a suitable model for communicating agricultural information effectively to the peasant farmers. The model elaborates how the community radio service should be set up, what the important components are, and how the community radio service can be incorporated into extension service programs.

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Article

Nancy Hill Allen

The mass media are cultural pipelines through which flow hours of entertainment and information. They represent a part of our culture which critics decry and media…

Abstract

The mass media are cultural pipelines through which flow hours of entertainment and information. They represent a part of our culture which critics decry and media specialists praise. They are difficult, if not impossible, to ignore. Television (free, cable, or pay) is the subject of attention of three‐year‐olds and Ph.D. candidates alike. Newspapers are perused daily by all classes and conditions of people and their content, ownership patterns, and circulation statistics are studied in journalism classes, high schools, and by worried editors and publishers. Films entertained children in Nickelodeons, raised the spirits of millions during World War II, and now are the subject of so much analysis that words like ‘pan,’ ‘take,’ and ‘track’ have taken on new meaning in the vocabulary of most ordinary citizens.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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