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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1936

F.W. Meredith

THE drag of a cooling system may conveniently be divided into three categories:

Abstract

THE drag of a cooling system may conveniently be divided into three categories:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 8 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1940

THIS article is a summary of certain Russian tests on the fitting of radiators inside an aerofoil with some comments on the work carried out.

Abstract

THIS article is a summary of certain Russian tests on the fitting of radiators inside an aerofoil with some comments on the work carried out.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

A multi‐robot line is now producing advanced design radiators at Llanelli Radiators' plant in South Wales. Brian Rooks has been to see the line in operation

Abstract

A multi‐robot line is now producing advanced design radiators at Llanelli Radiators' plant in South Wales. Brian Rooks has been to see the line in operation

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1935

A cooling system for aircraft engines is provided with a water‐cooling radiator, 14 of such size as to effect adequate cooling under normal conditions and a…

Abstract

A cooling system for aircraft engines is provided with a water‐cooling radiator, 14 of such size as to effect adequate cooling under normal conditions and a steam‐condenser 17 which becomes operative under abnormal conditions, the condenser being located behind the radiator or incorporared in the wing or fuselage structure in known manner so that only the water‐cooling radiator offers head resistance. Liquid and steam from the engine jackets 10 pass by a pipe 11 to a steam separator 12 whence the liquid descends to the radiator and steam passes through a dome 15 to the condenser, which is preferably formed of two similar triangular parts 18, 19, Fig. 3. The water from the radiator is returned by a pump 24 to the jackets and the condensate is delivered by a pump 21 back to the separator. In a modification, Fig. 4, a centrifugal steam separator 26, as described in Specification 315007, is employed, and the condenser is constituted by headers 31 and conduits 32 in the wing surface.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1936

The radiator b of a liquid‐cooled aircraft engine is housed in a tunnel‐like cowling bl, through which the slip stream flows by a contracted entrance and exit b3, b6 and…

Abstract

The radiator b of a liquid‐cooled aircraft engine is housed in a tunnel‐like cowling bl, through which the slip stream flows by a contracted entrance and exit b3, b6 and into which the exhaust is discharged by nozzles ƒ; the exhaust system thus has less drag on the aircraft, and the air flow past the radiator is increased. The radiator is of horseshoe shape in cross‐section, and inclined and Venturi‐shaped slats b4, ƒ1 are provided to steady the air flow and to act as silencers and flame dampers, The exhaust may be led by D‐sectioned pipes d1 arranged within the contour of the cowling, but separated therefrom by a cooling‐air space. Alternatively the pipes may be circular and located inside the cowling ; they are surrounded by jackets through which air is led by diverging intakes in the air stream and from which it is discharged behind the radiator. An oil cooler g is arranged in the cowling underneath the radiator. The two exhaust pipes of a V‐engine extend down the two sides of the cowling and are united to the pipe having the nozzles ƒ.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 8 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Antonio C. Caputo and Pacifico M. Pelagagge

Describes the reengineering of a production line for household heating tubular radiators, assuming as a reference scenario the facility of one of the leading Italian…

1505

Abstract

Describes the reengineering of a production line for household heating tubular radiators, assuming as a reference scenario the facility of one of the leading Italian manufacturers. After a preliminary characterization of products and manufacturing process, a thorough analysis of the production system has been carried out in order to highlight current problems and improvement strategies in the light of lean manufacturing concepts. Subsequently, suggests some corrective actions and also assesses their expected effectiveness in economic terms. In particular, improvement possibilities have been found in the areas of internal logistics through streamlining of materials flow and layout modifications, as well as process quality increase. Reengineering activities are especially aimed towards layout optimization mainly by resorting to a U‐shaped cell‐based architecture. Further, the reduction of rework percentage during the assembly phase has been pursued by properly modifying the operations sequence and through integration of a new automated testing station in the production line.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1987

R.D. Davis

Corrosion starts to attack the metallic and non‐metallic components of domestic and industrial heating systems from the time they are first filled with untreated water…

Abstract

Corrosion starts to attack the metallic and non‐metallic components of domestic and industrial heating systems from the time they are first filled with untreated water. The need for repairs, repetitive maintenance and component replacement is, in many cases, the result of a poor understanding of the contributory factors involved in how systems depreciate and also, to some extent, the complacency and shortsightedness of the specifiers and engineers responsible for the design and operation of such systems.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Mahdi Ashoori, Ghanbarali Sheikhzadeh and Soroush Sadripour

The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of using a ceiling fan with central heating system in the winter on thermal comfort and heat transfer rate in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of using a ceiling fan with central heating system in the winter on thermal comfort and heat transfer rate in a three-dimensional numerically.

Design/methodology/approach

The geometry had certain dimensions, and an occupant was modeled to be in the room. In models which were used, the flow was turbulent, and turbulence models were used for simulating turbulence. Between all the models, k-ε model had best matching.

Findings

Results show that using the ceiling fan during the winter had an efficient and considerable effect on improving the thermal comfort and energy saving inside buildings. By the use of ceiling fan, the effective room temperature has increased by 2.5°C. Furthermore, results show that by using ceiling fan in the winter, the predicted mean vote and the predicted percentage dissatisfied indexes improved. At the end, the case Room 11-0.05-15 with temperature of 87°C for radiator and normal fan velocity of o.25m/s were the optimal model that caused the complete thermal comfort and reduced energy consumption up to 28 per cent.

Originality/value

In the present study, the effects of using the ceiling fans on human comfort condition and heat transfer field during the winter (heating system) are studied. Following are the goals for all models: getting the appropriate temperature for radiator so that thermal comfort condition can be applied at the height of 75 cm of the room, velocity for fan so that air speed can be 0.25m/s at the height of 2 m or lower of the room and position to place the fan.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1944

THE general appearance of this oil cooler is shown in Fig. 1. The photograph was taken after partial sectioning to show more clearly the general construction.

Abstract

THE general appearance of this oil cooler is shown in Fig. 1. The photograph was taken after partial sectioning to show more clearly the general construction.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 16 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

A Steam‐cooled Aeroplane Engine IN R. & M. No. 1163 (“On the Correction of Heat from the Surface of an Aerofoil in a Wind Current”) the statement was made that “Although…

Abstract

A Steam‐cooled Aeroplane Engine IN R. & M. No. 1163 (“On the Correction of Heat from the Surface of an Aerofoil in a Wind Current”) the statement was made that “Although considerable constructional difficulties are encountered in the installation of wing radiators, their attractiveness from the point of view of saving head resistance seems likely to render them an indispensable feature of the fastest aeroplanes for some time to come.” Wing radiators have, of course, been a feature of the British Schneider Trophy seaplanes in the last two races. But for military purposes there are disadvantages in having a large portion of the surface of the wings of fighting aircraft rendered vulnerable by being utilised as radiators. It is at the same time clear that much resistance could be saved if the normal water radiator could be eliminated. An obvious method of achieving both objects is to go to steam cooling, the condensing tank forming the leading edges of the wings, which has the advantage of enabling the engine to be run at a more efficient temperature. In his Wilbur Wright lecture, Mr. Ricardo says that steam cooling “appears most attractive” (see page 178 of this issue), and the practicability of the system has been to some extent proved in the installation in R.101.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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