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Article

Rachel Robbins, Hugh McLaughlin, Concetta Banks, Claire Bellamy and Debbie Thackray

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential and limits of the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) in supporting adults with social care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the potential and limits of the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) in supporting adults with social care needs who also experience domestic violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a scoping review as part of a wider research project entitled: to identify and assess the effectiveness of social care's contribution to the development of MARAC and the protection of adults facing domestic violence.

Findings

An understanding of the workings of MARAC could support social care practice with high-risk victims of domestic violence. However, the conception of risk assessment and management central to the process also poses ethical dilemmas for practitioners.

Practical implications

Social care is ideally placed to support, in an holistic manner, a group of vulnerable service-users with complex needs. However, the current climate of austerity could jeopardise this work.

Originality/value

There is little in the professional and academic press on the MARAC process and particularly in relation to adults and older people. This paper alerts the practice community to the process, its historical development and characteristics and implications for practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Content available
Article

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Margaret Barwick

Describes a number of experiments with electronic documentdelivery, and the copyright problems that are affecting its use.Considers the inadequacies of interlending for…

Abstract

Describes a number of experiments with electronic document delivery, and the copyright problems that are affecting its use. Considers the inadequacies of interlending for the user, the interlending in Eastern Europe and Australia. Outlines the impact of CD‐ROM on document supply and suggests that interlending can be a social, cultural and economic measure.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Book part

Enase Okonedo

This chapter presents an understanding of the nature, peculiarities and factors that influence decision-making by executives and managers across the various sub-regions of…

Abstract

This chapter presents an understanding of the nature, peculiarities and factors that influence decision-making by executives and managers across the various sub-regions of Africa. Focusing on factors such as culture, faith, ethics, information paucity and institutions, the chapter examines the prevailing nature of decision-making in West Africa, East Africa, Northern Africa and Southern Africa. Interestingly, decision-making in these regions is characterised by unique features and peculiarities. The Ubuntu African philosophy was used to illustrate the traditional African lifestyle and decision-making practice. Drawing from both traditional and contemporary decision-making approaches, it identifies similarities as well as differences in the approach employed by decision-makers across the various sub-regions of Africa. To clearly articulate the similarities and differences, interviews and surveys were used to gather data from managers operating in these regions. Factor analysis enabled the description of underlying factors that drive decision-making within each region. The chapter further illustrates a framework for decision-making practice in Africa, which shows the dynamics and important features of decision-making among executives in Africa. The author describes decision- making as an essential competence for managers and posits that being cognisant of the factors that influence decision-making significantly improves organisational performance. In conclusion, it recommends suitable strategies that enhance the quality of decision-making for both managers and educators.

Details

Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

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Book part

Walter Humes

This chapter offers a description and analysis of teacher preparation in Scotland from the period after World War 1 to the end of the twentieth century. It traces the…

Abstract

This chapter offers a description and analysis of teacher preparation in Scotland from the period after World War 1 to the end of the twentieth century. It traces the development of the sector from Training Centres responsible to Provincial and National Committees, through monotechnic Colleges of Education, to Faculties of Education within Universities. Among the topics covered are: political and economic pressures affecting the policy context; the drive to improve standards and raise the professional status of teachers; the influence of key policy documents, such as the 1965 Primary Memorandum; the degree of control exercised by the Scottish Education Department; the significance of shifts in language (e.g. training/education/professional learning). The 1960s are seen as a particularly important period when major structural changes were introduced in Scottish education (e.g. the establishment of the General Teaching Council and Central Committees reviewing particular aspects of the school curriculum): these impacted on the aims and content of courses designed to prepare trainee teachers for work in schools. Similarly, later reforms of curriculum and assessment (Standard Grade, 5–14, Higher Still) necessitated responses by the teacher education community. Throughout the chapter certain key themes recur: the relationship between colleges and universities; the variable scope for innovation at different points in the twentieth century; the differential provision for primary and secondary teachers, graduates and non-graduates, men and women; the relative importance of academic knowledge and pedagogic skills.

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Book part

Sandra Eady

This chapter will provide an overview of Bachelor’s degrees into teaching in Scotland. It will consider how policy contexts shaped the original Bachelor degrees in…

Abstract

This chapter will provide an overview of Bachelor’s degrees into teaching in Scotland. It will consider how policy contexts shaped the original Bachelor degrees in Education (BEd) and more recently how policy discourse and texts have helped to shape the development of the new Bachelor's degrees in Education now on offer in Scotland.

Whilst the traditional Bachelor's degree in Education for many years remained the main undergraduate route for teacher education in Scotland, the publication of ‘Teaching Scotland's Future’ (Donaldson, 2011) recommended a gradual phasing out of the traditional undergraduate degree and the development of a new Bachelor's in Education ‘concurrent’ or ‘combined’ four-year undergraduate route. Donaldson's ‘vision’ of concurrency has been interpreted in many different ways across Scotland's universities resulting in a rich variety of new Bachelor's degrees in Education reflecting a range of structural, contextual, attitudinal and environmental constraints and opportunities which have influenced the nature of ‘concurrency’ at each institution.

The chapter traces how a number of influential policy texts from the 1960s onwards have influenced the repositioning of the new Bachelor degrees, which in turn aimed to broaden student teachers' understanding of teaching in the twenty-first century.

Details

Teacher Preparation in Scotland
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-480-4

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Article

Lydia Sin Ting Lam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the story of 15 TEFL/TESOL English language teachers who spend their lives working globally.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the story of 15 TEFL/TESOL English language teachers who spend their lives working globally.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews from the research based on the grounded approach generated, among others, three inter-related themes, namely, the global drift, distinctive cultural dispositions and the concept of global quality.

Findings

The global drift symbolizes interviewees’ mobility pattern and captures their Hong Kong experience in four states – adaptation, drifting in global comfort, drifting in global discomfort and bitter/sweet home, each representing a different quality of mobility which contributes to the development of cultural dispositions. Findings of cultural disposition home and openness are considered in relation to studies of its kind. Four aspects of home perceptions in the data are identified. While interviewees developed complex and varied notions of home, it is argued that the geographical home remains a significant resource in the making of home. Data also suggest that most interviewees’ openness is limited – it is selective, functional and transient. Global quality, a concept emerged from the research, summarizes the distinctive cultural traits of the community of the globals. It overlaps with, but does not necessarily equate with, cosmopolitanism.

Originality/value

The conclusion relates the study, including the concepts generated from this research, to cosmopolitanism. Two theoretical constructs are employed in the analysis: form of mobility and nature of mobility.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Teacher Preparation in Scotland
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-480-4

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Article

Rachel Kovacs

This study compares the strategies and impact of six British activist groups, as documented in 1997, with data gathered on the same groups in 2000. These groups, Voice of…

Abstract

This study compares the strategies and impact of six British activist groups, as documented in 1997, with data gathered on the same groups in 2000. These groups, Voice of the Listener and Viewer, Campaign for Quality Television, Deaf Broadcasting Council, Consumers Association, National Consumers Council and National Listeners and Viewers Association, attempted to build a public sphere for generating debate around and catalysing changes to broadcasting policies and programming. They were tracked in 2000 in order to identify those issues, relationships and groups that had endured. The research design provided a telescopic look at their interactions with their targets and with each other during a period of rapid technological and industry change. In a multichannel broadcasting environment where convergence and globalisation are buzzwords, activists used public relations to create a broader public forum for a wide range of significant issues with which to engage demographically, psychographically and geographically diverse publics. The ensuing media education, media advocacy and relationship building, although elite in origins, strengthened democratic discourse, thus reaffirming broadcasting’s invaluable role in civil society.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article

Reza Salehzadeh

The purpose of this paper is to propose the new typologies of leader–member exchange (LMX) theory.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose the new typologies of leader–member exchange (LMX) theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conducted a thorough, targeted literature review along with a qualitative research method involving in-depth, open-ended and semi-structured interviews. The interviews were conducted with 21 managers and 70 employees of different public organizations during the two years. After interviews, data were transcribed and the qualitative research method of theory elaboration was used to extract the themes from the transcripts.

Findings

The results showed that the LMX has a dynamic nature with four different versions. Also, the results discovered the multi-level of LMX with three different types of leaders’ styles. In addition, four factors that cause damage to high-quality relationships have been identified (i.e. perceived dissimilarity, feeling of being betrayed, failure to meet the expectations and impression management). Finally, the results discovered five dark sides of LMX.

Originality/value

This research proposes the new typologies of LMX and the approach and findings of this research contribute to the literature of leadership theories.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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