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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Rachel Mindra, Musa Moya, Linda Tia Zuze and Odongo Kodongo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial self-efficacy (FSE) and financial inclusion (FI) among individual financial consumers in Uganda.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between financial self-efficacy (FSE) and financial inclusion (FI) among individual financial consumers in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach and cross-sectional research design, a sample of 400 individuals from urban Central and rural Northern Uganda was drawn. SPSS and AMOS™ 21, regression analysis and structural equation models were used to establish the hypothesized relationship between FSE and FI.

Findings

The results suggest a strong positive and significant relationship between FSE and FI. The results further suggest that other variables which were controlled for, such as age and gender, had significant influence on an individual’s usage of formal financial services.

Research limitations/implications

The study was assessed using both potential and actual consumers of financial services collectively. However, if separately assessed, possibly there would be a variation in behavioral responses toward FI.

Practical implications

Formal financial service providers need to enhance individuals’ levels of confidence in management of finances and utilization of formal financial products and services, so that the financial consumers can realize the changes in financial behavior and consequently FI.

Social implications

The enhancement of individuals’ level of confidence in evaluating the available financial service options will guide them to take financial decisions that will improve their livelihood.

Originality/value

The results contribute toward the limited empirical and theoretical evidence for FSE and FI from a behavioral demand-side perspective.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rachel Mindra and Musa Moya

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of financial self-efficacy (FSE) on the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of financial self-efficacy (FSE) on the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and financial inclusion (FI) among individuals in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach and cross-sectional research design, a sample of 400 individuals from urban Central and rural Northern Uganda was drawn. Using SPSS and AMOS™ 21, structural equation models and bootstrapping methods were used to establish the hypothesized relationships and mediation effects between financial attitude, financial literacy and FI.

Findings

The results suggested FSE as a mediator of the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and FI. Further, there was a significant and insignificant relationship between financial literacy, financial attitude and FI, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study was assessed using both potential and actual consumers of financial services collectively. However if separately assessed, possibly there would be a variation in perceptions or behavioural responses towards FI.

Practical implications

There is a need to develop and sustain high levels of financial confidence among individuals to enable them use formal financial services.

Social implications

Possession of financial knowledge, skills, an evaluative judgement with high levels of financial confidence enable individuals make financial decisions that improve their integration into the formal financial system and improved welfare.

Originality/value

The results contribute towards the limited empirical and theoretical evidence regarding the mediating role of FSE in explaining the financial behaviour.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Ernest Abaho, Rachel Mindra, Ester Agasha and Aminah Balunywa

The study examined the nature of the operation of informal savings groups. Emphasis was on their composition, the mode of financial transactions and sharing of financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined the nature of the operation of informal savings groups. Emphasis was on their composition, the mode of financial transactions and sharing of financial proceeds, the impact of the savings and members loaning on the members' financial and business growth, and the perception of the members on the benefits of the savings. The study also profiled the significant challenges encountered by the groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory research design. The point of saturation was achieved after 15 members of informal savings groups were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis techniques with the aid of NVivo version 10 software, and verbatim tests were used to explain the emergent themes.

Findings

The findings indicate that informal savings groups are accessible, sustainable and inclusive financing alternatives for low-income earners. Group sizes range from 250 to 3 members. As a sign of commitment, a form of identification is required to join the group. Findings also indicate that group leaders are elected, and their term of service could be renewable. It was discovered that members join mainly to save in financial terms, and they have benefited both monetary and socially. The biggest challenge these groups face is that members default.

Practical implications

The study provides evidence that informal financial service providers are an effective alternative to business financing that leverage existing social structures that are predominant in Uganda.

Originality/value

The study provides a benchmark for understanding the dynamics, capabilities and challenges impeding the survival and growth of informal savings groups as critical components in Uganda's financial system.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Rachel Mindra, Juma Bananuka, Twaha Kaawaase, Rehma Namaganda and Juma Teko

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between attitude and the intention to adopt Islamic banking in a Christian-dominated country and whether such a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between attitude and the intention to adopt Islamic banking in a Christian-dominated country and whether such a relationship is moderated and boosted by pricing of conventional bank products and social influence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a cross-sectional and correlational design as data were collected between July and September 2019. Data were collected using a questionnaire from a sample of 384 adult individuals with bank accounts in conventional commercial banks from which 300 responded, indicating a response rate of 78%.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that attitude is significantly associated with the intention to adopt Islamic banking. This relationship is moderated and boosted by the pricing of conventional bank products and social influence. The interaction of pricing of conventional bank products with attitude is positive and significantly influence the intention to adopt Islamic banking. The interaction of attitude and social influence is significant but negatively related with the intention to adopt Islamic banking.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses quantitative data which sometimes misses certain information and limits the respondent’s opinions on the study variables. A mixed method research needs to be conducted on pricing of conventional bank products, social influence, attitude and adoption of Islamic banking to gather the respondent’s opinions on the variables.

Practical implications

IB being an alternative source of financing of business in most parts of the world, existing bank customers, international funding agencies and religious leaders could mount pressure on government to speed up the licensing of institutions interested in offering Islamic banking services.

Social implications

Uganda being a secular state and having finalized Islamic banking laws in early 2018, it is surprising that there is no bank that has so far started offering Islamic banking products.

Originality/value

This study provides an initial empirical evidence from a Christian-dominated country on the moderating effect of pricing of conventional bank products and social influence in the relationship between attitude and intention to adopt Islamic banking.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Juma Bananuka, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Rachel Katoroogo Mindra and Isaac Newton Kayongo

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting standards by Uganda manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from manufacturing firms in Uganda using a questionnaire survey to find out their perception of compliance with the GRI standards. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences, Microsoft Excel and smart partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS–SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that on average, manufacturing firms in Uganda comply with GRI sustainability reporting standards to the extent of 59%. The results further indicate that manufacturing companies comply more with the GRI 200 (economic performance disclosures) to the extent of 63% as compared with 55% for GRI 300 (environmental performance disclosures) and 58% for GRI 400 (social performance disclosures). The results also indicate that intellectual capital has a significant impact on the GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures in Uganda. However, board gender diversity has no significant effect. In terms of the control variables, only firm size is significant, while firm age, capital structure and auditor type are not.

Originality/value

This study provides first time evidence of the extent of compliance with the GRI sustainability reporting standards using evidence from Uganda – an African developing country. This study widens the understanding of the usage of GRI standards in the preparation of sustainability reports by manufacturing firms in an emerging economy. This study also provides first-time evidence on the role of gender diversity and intellectual capital in GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures using evidence from Uganda's manufacturing sector.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Muhammad Zia-ur-Rehman, Khalid Latif, Muhammad Mohsin, Zahid Hussain, Sajjad Ahmad Baig and Izma Imtiaz

The basic intention of this research is to investigate the role of information transparency of financial institutions and psychological attitude of the individuals toward…

Abstract

Purpose

The basic intention of this research is to investigate the role of information transparency of financial institutions and psychological attitude of the individuals toward their attention to saving and borrowing. This study also tries to know how an individual's psychological factor affects a person's attitude to motivate them to save or borrow and contribute to well-being by giving them confidence that they can face financial challenges. So, the main concern of this study is to explore different factors that ultimately contribute to the financial well-being (FWB) of individual.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted by using a well-structured questionnaire to collect data and test the developed hypotheses by using SmartPLS. Data were collected from 120 customers of seven different commercial banks in Pakistan.

Findings

The findings of this study show that perceived information transparency positively affects FWB. It is also because transparent shared information creates positive change in individuals' perceived self-efficacy and leads to FWB. Furthermore, an individual's psychological attitude toward borrowing and saving did not contribute to the FWB of people who belong to Pakistan.

Research limitations/implications

The research area is limited to one city of Pakistan and analysis is done with small numbers of sample, it can be increased and more areas can be explored.

Practical implications

This research provides significant implications for people and economists by providing awareness about the antecedents of FWB. The policymakers or managers who work in financial institutions should provide more transparent information and create less risky opportunities to improve the individual's well-being. If person, manager and financial institution can properly utilize the information of this study, then they are able to improve their FWB. By providing more transparent services and favorable experience with your dealings, it could help to obtain and retain more loyal internal (employees) and external customers. The loyal customers and sincere employees can increase the productivity level of organization. The more productive organizations in countries means better society and progress in the economy.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the body of knowledge that how perceived information transparency and psychological attitude of borrowing create improvement and upward changes in the FWB of a person.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Arthur Sserwanga, Rebecca Isabella Kiconco, Malin Nystrand and Rachel Mindra

– The purpose of this study was to explore the role social entrepreneurship has played in post conflict recovery in Gulu district in northern Uganda.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the role social entrepreneurship has played in post conflict recovery in Gulu district in northern Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory and qualitative research design was used to examine the role of social entrepreneurship in post conflict recovery in the Gulu community located in Uganda. A sample of five social entrepreneurs and 15 beneficiaries were interviewed.

Findings

The findings revealed that there is an association between active social entrepreneurship and post conflict recovery. Social entrepreneurship was found to create opportunity recognition, networking and innovation at both an individual and societal level.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of the findings was limited by sample and method. A cross-sectional design that was used does not allow for a long-term impact study and limited empirical published research done.

Originality/value

This in-depth richness provides a clearer appreciation of the role social entrepreneurs’ play in post conflict recovery.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Nyoman Trisna Herawati, I. Made Candiasa, I. Ketut Yadnyana and Naswan Suharsono

This paper aims to analyse the effect of financial learning quality (FLQ) and parental socioeconomic status (SES) on the financial self-efficacy (FSE) of undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the effect of financial learning quality (FLQ) and parental socioeconomic status (SES) on the financial self-efficacy (FSE) of undergraduate Accounting students in Bali with students’ financial literacy (FL) serving a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a quantitative design with ex post facto approach and path analysis technique. Research data were collected by administering a financial literacy test on, and questionnaires distributed to, the sample selected using a purposive random sampling technique. The research sample consisted of undergraduate Accounting students in Bali who were in their fourth or sixth semesters, numbering 518.

Findings

The research results show that financial learning quality and parental socioeconomic status directly influenced financial literacy. Financial learning quality and socioeconomic status did not have any direct influence on financial self-efficacy, but financial literacy directly affected financial self-efficacy. Additionally, the results also show that financial literacy was able to mediate learning quality’s and socioeconomic status’ relationships with financial self-efficacy.

Practical implications

The research results indicate that financial learning quality had a significant effect on financial literacy but lacked any direct influence on financial self-efficacy. This suggests that it is important to improve financial learning quality in not only cognitive aspect (knowledge) but also practical aspect, which will contribute to the improvement in students’ financial self-efficacy. In the future, research can be continued by finding other variables that are more dominant in influencing financial self efficacy. In addition, research and development approach can be done to find a learning model that can improve financial self-efficacy among accounting students.

Originality/value

Previous studies predominantly investigated the factors that affect financial literacy in students. There has been a small body of research that addresses financial self-efficacy, especially in Accounting students. Therefore, this research makes a contribution to the knowledge on factors that influence, either directly or indirectly, FSE in students with financial literacy serving as a mediator.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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