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Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Rachel Jenkins

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Rachel Jenkins, Howard Meltzer, Brian Jacobs and David McDaid

The European Union‐supported Child and Adolescent Mental Health in an Enlarged Europe (CAMHEE) project aimed to provide an overview of the challenges, current practice and…

Abstract

The European Union‐supported Child and Adolescent Mental Health in an Enlarged Europe (CAMHEE) project aimed to provide an overview of the challenges, current practice and guidelines for developing effective mental health promotion and mental illness prevention policy and practice across Europe. As part of this work, an analysis was undertaken of the situation in England, making use of a bespoke data collection instrument and protocol.Our analysis suggests that there has been significant effort and investment in research, needs assessment, policy, human resource and service developments in CAMHS over the last 20 years, leading to a more detailed understanding and availability of services. Much of the emphasis has been on assessment and management of difficulties, however in recent years attention has begun to focus on mental health promotion. National standards and programmes such as Every Child Matters (Department for Education and Skills, 2004) have acted as catalysts for a number of national initiatives.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Woody Caan and Rachel Jenkins

To promote stable mental well‐being during childhood (from birth to 19‐years‐old) should be a major priority for governments. This is the time within the lifespan when…

Abstract

To promote stable mental well‐being during childhood (from birth to 19‐years‐old) should be a major priority for governments. This is the time within the lifespan when children will learn and develop the most, so positive influences are greatest at a young age. This paper reports recommendations suggested by a workshop held in London in 2006, organised by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London. The workshop considered the core components of effective methods of integrating mental health within health (and other public sector) reforms, which would be relevant to future strategic planning in diverse, national settings. One of the key policy topics considered by the workshop was child mental health. Recommendations were made by the group for incorporating developmentally appropriate actions, at multiple levels: in family, school and community environments.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Rachel Jenkins and Bruce Singh

Governments have increasingly directed attention to reducing mortality and morbidity due to a variety of causes. This paper provides an international review of policy and…

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Abstract

Governments have increasingly directed attention to reducing mortality and morbidity due to a variety of causes. This paper provides an international review of policy and practice in suicide prevention. The role of national policies and practice are outlined and discussed. The value of a co‐ordinated approach to reducing the burden of disease due to suicide and parasuicide is stressed.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2011

Rachel Jenkins and Nahla Shoja' Aldeen

This paper seeks to report the findings of a half‐day workshop on the impact and control of Qat, held in Yemen in February 2010. Senior mental health policy makers…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report the findings of a half‐day workshop on the impact and control of Qat, held in Yemen in February 2010. Senior mental health policy makers, professionals and leaders of mental health non‐governmental organizations (NGOs), were present as part of a wider five‐day national stakeholder conference to develop national mental health strategy for Yemen, at the request of the Social Development Fund for Yemen and in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. The purpose of the half‐day workshop was to examine the knowledge and practice of senior Yemeni mental health policy makers and other stakeholders in relation to Qat.

Design/methodology/approach

The stakeholders were purposively selected by the Yemen Social Development Fund to provide representation from the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Social Affairs, Ministry of Human Rights, Ministry of Religious Affairs and Department of Prison Administration, which is linked to the Ministry of the Interior, United Nations Childrens Fund, various mental health NGOs and psychiatrists and psychologists from the main universities in the country. The stakeholders were divided into four workgroups, and each group was given a specified theme to discuss for an hour, namely the impact of Qat on the Yemen economy, health and society and measures to control the use of Qat. All participants were also asked if they habitually chewed Qat.

Findings

The stakeholders (professionals, policy makers and leaders of NGOs) were very knowledgeable about the physical, psychological and social effects of habitual Qat consumption, and yet all except one were habitual chewers.

Originality/value

Efforts to discourage the chronic use of Qat will need to be strenuous, consistent and coordinated across sectors. Knowledge of health and social risks alone is unlikely be sufficient to bring about change.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

John Murray

In the wake of the financial crisis and ensuing recession, there has been a substantial increase in the number of individuals and households unable to meet their financial…

Abstract

In the wake of the financial crisis and ensuing recession, there has been a substantial increase in the number of individuals and households unable to meet their financial commitments, especially in London, UK. This growth in personal debt problems has significant implications for individual health and the associated need for NHS care. There is growing evidence that financial problems are associated with stress‐related ill health, both mental and physical. This ar ticle summarises the London Health Forum's repor t on the relationship between personal debt and health in London and reviews other studies that have carried out research on health and debt.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Charlene Sorensen and Rachel Sarjeant-Jenkins

Libraries are situated in an ever-changing research, teaching, learning, and scholarly communications environment. Faculty and students have new and different expectations…

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Abstract

Purpose

Libraries are situated in an ever-changing research, teaching, learning, and scholarly communications environment. Faculty and students have new and different expectations that are compelling libraries to expand their offerings. At the same time, their broader institutions are also facing changing times and academic libraries are being asked to demonstrate value and justify the use of limited and high-demand resources. In order to address the resulting challenge, the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) Library undertook a process to deliver relevant and responsive (and, therefore, reflective and adaptable) library services while working within its current librarian complement. Significant changes were necessary for this to be successful: the librarians would need to undertake new responsibilities, learn new skills, and engage with learners and researchers in new ways. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The U of S Library chose to meet this challenge through a multi-part approach comprised of regular participative consultations with librarians and a grassroots-based planning process underpinned by change management methodology.

Findings

This approach resulted in widespread employee engagement, from initially clarifying the necessary change and throughout the change implementation. This led to a sense of ownership, responsibility, and accountability.

Originality/value

Change is difficult and often met with resistance. The U of S Library presents a case of successfully engaging library employees throughout a change process, demonstrating the importance of bringing together participative consultation, grassroots planning, and change management as a combined change implementation approach.

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Library Management, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2018

Rachel Dodds, Brittany Jenkins, Wayne Smith and Robert E. Pitts

Sales and purchases of socially and environmentally responsible festival clothing are a way for festival attendees to engage in ethical consumption and for event…

Abstract

Sales and purchases of socially and environmentally responsible festival clothing are a way for festival attendees to engage in ethical consumption and for event organizers to undertake sustainable procurement. Although there have been a number of studies examining willingness-to-pay (WTP), few of them examine this in a festival setting, and there is a gap in existing research regarding the determination of actual behavior. The goal of this study is therefore to explore participants’ willingness-to-pay for apparel based on more external motivations (visible environmental messages) and then ascertain whether this behavior was actually replicated in a natural field setting. This study first collected surveys from 427 festival-goers in 2015, then used a natural field experiment in 2016 to investigate whether attendees at the Mariposa Folk Festival in Ontario, Canada, would actually be prepared to pay a premium for ethical festival T-shirts over a conventional alternative. The findings reveal that attendees not only showed a willingness-to-pay but they also did actually pay a premium for such T-shirts.

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Contemporary Challenges of Climate Change, Sustainable Tourism Consumption, and Destination Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-343-8

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Gordon Bell

This paper seeks to describe a new service developed by national debt charity Consumer Credit Counselling Service (CCCS) aimed at identifying clients within its online…

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178

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe a new service developed by national debt charity Consumer Credit Counselling Service (CCCS) aimed at identifying clients within its online debt counselling tool who may be suffering from stress and anxiety and then referring them for advice and support, including computer‐based cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT).

Design/methodology/approach

Since December 2010, clients using CCCS Debt Remedy, the charity's online debt counselling tool, have been asked four trigger questions which indicate whether the user is suffering from depression and/or anxiety. Clients who show these signs, after they receive a recommendation about how to deal with their debt, are offered the opportunity to complete a more comprehensive assessment known as CCCS Wellbeing. The CCCS Wellbeing assessment consists of 16 questions, nine relating to depression and seven to anxiety. The depression questions are based on the medically endorsed depression screener, PHQ‐9, and the anxiety questions are based on the similarly medically endorsed anxiety screener, GAD‐7. These two screeners are also the source of the four original trigger questions.

Findings

Of the 36,618 clients who were counselled by CCCS Debt Remedy between the launch of the new service in December 2010 and the end of May 2011, 65 percent obtained a recommendation to undertake CCCS Wellbeing. The vast majority of clients who obtained a CCCS Wellbeing recommendation through the online debt counselling tool were showing signs of both depression and anxiety (74 percent).

Originality/value

The high propensity for people to be recommended to CCCS Wellbeing demonstrates the need for the service. This will inform future service development by CCCS, which is studying new ways to further identify and refer for help its clients who are struggling with their mental health.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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