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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Emily Hellmich, Jill Castek, Blaine E. Smith, Rachel Floyd and Wen Wen

Multimodal composing is often romanticized as a flexible approach suitable for all learners. There is a lack of research that critically examines students’ perspectives…

Abstract

Purpose

Multimodal composing is often romanticized as a flexible approach suitable for all learners. There is a lack of research that critically examines students’ perspectives and the constraints of multimodal composing across academic contexts. This study aims to address this need by exploring high school learners’ perspectives and experiences enacting multimodal learning in an L2 classroom. More specifically, this study presents key tensions between students’ experiences of multimodal composing and teacher/researchers’ use of multimodal composition in an L2 classroom setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on two multimodal composing projects developed within a design-based implementation research approach and implemented in a high school French class. Multiple data sources were used: observations; interviews; written reflections; and multimodal compositions. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique (CIT). A critical incident is one that is unplanned and that stimulates reflection on teaching and learning. Methodologically, CIT was enacted through iterative coding to identify critical incidents and collaborative analysis.

Findings

Using illustrative examples from multiple data sources, this study discusses four tensions between students’ experiences of multimodal composing and teacher/researchers’ use of multimodal composition in a classroom setting: the primary audience of student projects, the media leveraged in student projects, expectations of learning in school and the role of a public viewing of student work.

Originality/value

This paper problematizes basic assumptions and benefits of multimodal composing and offers ideas on how to re-center multimodal composing on student voices.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

David E. Low, Jessica Zacher Pandya and Lisa K. Kervin

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Abstract

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Rachel A. Gibson and Jane Clarbour

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factor structure of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA, Prince-Embury, 2006, 2007) and to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factor structure of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA, Prince-Embury, 2006, 2007) and to provide supporting evidence that this is a psychometrically sound measure for practitioners and researchers to use to assess resilience in incarcerated male adolescent offenders in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine if the factor structure could be replicated among incarcerated male adolescent offenders. Concurrent validation of the measure was also conducted, utilising the Beck Youth Inventory, second edition (BYI-II-II; Beck et al., 2005).

Findings

CFA of the RSCA was unable to confirm the structure of the measure at an item level, therefore parcelling techniques were utilised similarly to Prince-Embury and Courville (2008), using the subscales for the factors as indicators for the factors. While a three-factor model was found to be an acceptable fit to the data, there was also some support for a two-factor model. Despite this, there was more statistical support for the three-factor model and arguments are made for retaining this structure. Expected associations between the three subscales of sense of mastery, sense of relatedness and emotional reactivity were found with the Beck Youth Inventory demonstrating support for the concurrent validity of the measure in incarcerated male adolescent offenders.

Practical implications

This paper provides support for the internal structure of the RSCA with incarcerated male adolescent offenders within the UK, although some caution should be used when interpreting scores from the subscales. The findings suggest that the RSCA can be utilised by practitioners to identify young people who may benefit from additional support and also in assessment and treatment/intervention planning. This may be particularly useful when practitioners wish to explore the potential protective nature of resilience.

Originality/value

The current study is the first of its kind to formally explore the factor structure of the RSCA with incarcerated male adolescent offenders.

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Caroline T. Clark, Rachel Skrlac Lo, Ashley Boyd, Michael Cook, Adam Crawley and Ryan M. Rish

This study aims to share the development of new conceptual tools, which merge theories of critical whiteness studies (CWS), epistemic injustice and abolitionist teaching…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to share the development of new conceptual tools, which merge theories of critical whiteness studies (CWS), epistemic injustice and abolitionist teaching, applying them to the discourse of pre- and in-service teachers across the predominantly white institutions (PWIs) as they discuss antiracist teaching through the book Stamped and a series of online discussions.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative, collaborative practitioner inquiry derived data from video-recorded, online discussions, interviews and weekly research meetings. Critical discourse analysis revealed theoretical gaps and prompted the integration of additional theories, resulting in new conceptual tools, which are applied here to both “in the moment” exchanges between participants and individuals’ reflections in interviews.

Findings

Applying new conceptual tools to discussions of whiteness and race revealed how epistemic harm, microresistance and epistemic justice emerge in talk along with the importance of cultivating critical vigilance among antiracist educators.

Originality/value

This study elucidates how merging the conceptual frameworks of CWS, epistemic injustice and abolitionist teaching provides new tools for interrogating antiracism relative to whiteness in participants’ and researchers’ experiences. It challenges teacher educators, particularly at PWIs, to recognize how epistemic harm may be inflicted on students of color when centering whiteness in teacher education.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Marius Pretorius and Rachel Maritz

More than ever, businesses need to get their strategy right. Part of achieving this is the approach to strategy making that is chosen. The purpose of this paper is to

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Abstract

Purpose

More than ever, businesses need to get their strategy right. Part of achieving this is the approach to strategy making that is chosen. The purpose of this paper is to describe how strategy making happens on the continuum of deliberate versus emerging strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Through in‐depth interviews with “strategy informants” (CEO's) in businesses and questionnaires to respondents (managers) in the same organizations, statistical techniques have helped us draw interesting conclusions about strategy making approaches, its elements and factors moderating the choice of strategy making approach. Through factor analysis, the construct of strategy making is informed by three concepts namely: “performance consensus”, “ends and means specificity” as well as “ends and means flexibility”.

Findings

“Ends and means specificity” was associated more with the deliberate strategy approach while “ends and means flexibility” was associated more with the emerging strategy approach. “Performance consensus” was neutral and therefore relevant to both approached. Approaches also show differences depending on the following characteristics: “degree of risk taking preferred”, “comfort with stability and predictability” as well as “primarily autonomous or individual behavior preferred”. Finally, strategy making approach is moderated by “firm size”, “CEO influence” and “environmental uncertainty”.

Originality/value

Knowing the appropriate strategy making approach gives managers flexibility. There is no need to choose one approach above the other but rather to be aware of benefits that can be derived from both. The fast changing environment places pressure on the use of emergent strategy, therefore performance consensus is critical contributor to successful use thereof.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

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Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Rachael Rief and Samantha Clinkinbeard

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between officer perceptions of fit in their organization and stress (organizational and operational), overall job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between officer perceptions of fit in their organization and stress (organizational and operational), overall job satisfaction and turnover contemplation (within the last 6 months).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used cross-sectional survey data from a sample of 832 officers from two Midwest police departments to examine the relationships between fit, stress and work-related attitudes.

Findings

Perceived stress and organizational fit were strong predictors of overall job satisfaction and turnover contemplation; organizational fit accounted for the most variation in stress, satisfaction and turnover contemplation. Organizational stress partially mediated the relationship between organizational fit and job satisfaction and organizational fit and turnover contemplation.

Research Implications

More research is needed to identify predictors of organizational fit perceptions among police officers.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that agencies should pay close attention to the organizational culture and structure when trying to address issues of officer well-being and retention. Further, the person−environment framework can be a useful tool in examining police occupational outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors findings contribute to research on officer stress by exploring perceptions of organizational fit as a predictor of stress and unpacking how officer stress matters to important work outcomes, including job satisfaction and thoughts of turnover, by considering stress as a mediator between organizational fit and these work outcomes.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Richard A. Slaughter

The purposes of this paper are as follows. Part one examines the role of denialism in the context of proposals advanced through the much-abused Limits to Growth (LtG…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are as follows. Part one examines the role of denialism in the context of proposals advanced through the much-abused Limits to Growth (LtG) project. Part two uses three sets of criteria (domains of reality, worldviews and values) to characterise some of the interior human and social aspects of the “denial machine.” It uses these criteria to address some vital, but currently under-appreciated “interior” aspects of descent. (N.B. A succinct “primer” or overview of the concept and underpinning rationale for notions of “descent pathways” is provided in the introduction to this special issue.)

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a number of authoritative sources that track the dimensions of global change and, specifically, the ways that humanity is tracking towards Dystopian overshoot-and-collapse futures. The significance of the LtG project is assessed in this context. Part two employs the criteria noted above to identify and open out the centrality of the human and cultural interiors.

Findings

Responses to the LtG project are shown to have deprived humanity of the clarity and will to respond effectively to the emerging global emergency. The rise of climate change denialism has followed suit and made effective responses increasingly difficult. A new focus, however, on some of the dynamics of reality domains, worldviews and values, clarifies both the nature of the problem and prefigures a range of solutions, some of which are briefly outlined.

Research limitations/implications

This is primarily a conceptual paper that suggests a range of practical responses. For example, re-purposing parts of the current information technology (IT) infrastructure away from financial and economic indices to those tracking the health of the planet. Also translating the case put forward here for a new generation of Institutions of Foresight (IoFs) into real-world start-ups and examples. Further research is needed into the uses and limitations both of positive and negative views of futures. It is suggested that the latter have more value than is commonly realised.

Practical implications

In addition to those stated above, the practical implications include new uses for IT infrastructure based on worldcentric – rather than financial and economic worldviews; designing and implementing a new generation of IoFs; and finding new ways to inform the public of impending Dystopian outcomes without exacerbating avoidance and depression.

Social implications

The social implications are profound. Currently, humanity has allowed itself to “tune out” and ignore many of the well-founded “signals” (from the global system) and warnings (from those who have observed and tracked real-world changes). As a result, it has outgrown the capacity of the planet to support the current population, let alone the 10 billion currently projected by the United Nations (UN). Something must give. Applied foresight can provide essential lead time to act before human actions are overwhelmed by forces beyond its control.

Originality/value

The paper draws together material from hitherto disparate sources to assess the LtG project. It also deploys key concepts from an integral perspective that shed new light on human and cultural forces that determine how people respond to the prospect of Dystopian futures. In so doing, it provides insight into why we are where we are and also into some of the means by which humanity can respond. Specifically, it suggests a shift from collapse narratives to those of descent.

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Dalal Alrubaishi, Helen Haugh, Paul Robson, Rachel Doern and William J. Wales

This study investigates the impact of socioemotional wealth (SEW) on family firm entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in Saudi Arabia, and the moderating effect of…

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of socioemotional wealth (SEW) on family firm entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in Saudi Arabia, and the moderating effect of generational involvement on this relationship. Our data set comprises 241 privately, wholly owned family firms. We examine EO as a strategic orientation expressed in terms of both firm behavior and how managers approach risk-taking attitudinally. Our study finds that SEW is positively related to firms’ entrepreneurial behavior, but not managerial attitudes toward risk-taking. However, the positive effects of SEW on firms’ entrepreneurial behavior diminish as the number of generations involved in the family business increases. The broader implications for enabling entrepreneurship within Arab transforming economies adhering to strong cultural tribalistic norms are discussed.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Brian T. McClendon, Steven Prentice‐Dunn, Rachel Blake and Ben McMath

This study examined the relation between appearance concern (i.e. a dispositional focus on one’s looks) and responses to an intervention targeting suntanning and sunscreen…

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Abstract

This study examined the relation between appearance concern (i.e. a dispositional focus on one’s looks) and responses to an intervention targeting suntanning and sunscreen use among young adults. The intervention produced increases in sun safe attitudes, intentions, and behavior. Appearance concern was correlated at posttest with perceived vulnerability to the damaging effects of the sun, perceived severity of the damaging effects, and perceived rewards of a tan. One month later, only the association with perceived rewards was significant. Appearance concern was not significantly correlated with intentions or change in skin tone. More powerful interventions may be needed to have a lasting impact on attitudes and behavior regarding sun exposure. However, such interventions must not provoke defensive reactions in individuals who are high in appearance concern.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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