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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Elisabeth Kelan and Rachel Dunkley Jones

This paper aims to explore whether the rite of passage is still a useful model with which to conceptualise the MBA in the era of the boundaryless career.

1016

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore whether the rite of passage is still a useful model with which to conceptualise the MBA in the era of the boundaryless career.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the formative experiences of full‐time MBA students at an elite business school, using in‐depth qualitative interviews. Through a discourse analysis, the paper shows how MBA students draw on concepts resembling the anthropological model of the rite of passage when making sense of their experience.

Findings

The resources MBA students have available to talk about their MBA experience mirror the three‐step rite of passage model. The first step involves separation from a previous career, either because of limited opportunities for advancement or in order to explore alternative career paths. In the transition or liminoid stage, identities are in flux and a strong sense of community is developed among the students and they play with different identities. In the third stage, the incorporation, students reflect on the value of the MBA for their future career.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the MBA is still seen as a rite of passage at a time when careers are becoming boundaryless. Within this more fluid context, the rite in itself is seen as enhancing the individual's brand value and confidence, enabling them to negotiate the challenges of managing a boundaryless career.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Andrew Ware, Anna Preston and Simon Draycott

People with a borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis can require support from mental health services for managing risk behaviour. Current routine inpatient and community…

Abstract

Purpose

People with a borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis can require support from mental health services for managing risk behaviour. Current routine inpatient and community treatment can be unhelpful for this group. Positive risk taking has been developed to help community teams manage risk with people with a BPD. This study aims to explore experiences of risk management in an NHS Trust where positive risk taking is being implemented with people with a BPD.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretative phenomenological analysis is the methodology of transcripts from semi-structured interviews. Nine adults with a diagnosis of BPD and current or previous experiences of risk management approaches were sampled from one NHS Trust.

Findings

Limited resources and interpersonal barriers had a negative impact on experiences of Positive risk taking. Participants experienced one-off risk assessments and short-term interventions such as medication which they described as “meaningless”. Traumatic experiences could make it difficult to establish therapeutic relationships and elicit unhelpful responses from professionals. Participants could only feel “taken seriously” when in crisis which contributed towards an increase in risky behaviour. Positive risk taking was contingent upon collaborative and consistent professional relationships which created a “safety net”, enabling open communication and responsibility taking which challenged recovery-relapse patterns of service use.

Research limitations/implications

Positive risk taking approaches to risk management may benefit people with a BPD. Findings complement those from other studies emphasising the importance of compassion and empathy when working with personality disorder. Training and increased resources are required to implement effective risk management with this group.

Originality/value

Findings expand upon the sparse existing research in the area of risk management using the Positive risk taking approach with people with a BPD diagnosis, and provide idiographic understanding which is clinically meaningful. Participants’ experiences suggest Positive risk taking may provide a framework for improving quality of life and decreasing service use for people diagnosed with BPD engaging in risk management with Community Mental Health Teams, which facilitates recovery and other benefits.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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