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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Andrew Fearne, Rachel Duffy and Susan Hornibrook

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the nature and scope of good and bad practice in the relationships that UK supermarkets have with their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors (meat, dairy, fresh produce).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a postal survey of supermarket suppliers, which formed part of a wider study of corporate social responsibility in UK supermarket supply chains.

Findings

The results demonstrate the heterogeneity in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers of own‐label products in the main commodity sectors the extent to which retail and supply chain strategy is likely to influence the way in which supermarkets deal with suppliers. Best practice was most evident in the two supermarket supply chains where supply base rationalisation has virtually ceased and the adoption of lead suppliers and sole suppliers has been most evident in recent years.

Research limitations/implications

Postal survey limited to suppliers in three commodity sectors, where buyer power is greatest. Would expect different results for relationships with branded suppliers.

Practical implications

With supermarkets coming under increasing scrutiny over the way they treat suppliers, the conceptual framework and survey instrument represent a mechanism for independent assessment of supply chain relationships in sensitive markets, which could be used constructively to encourage the more widespread adoption of good practice and the elimination of bad practice in supermarket relationships.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of the first attempt anywhere to empirically measure fairness in relationships between supermarkets and their suppliers. Further research is necessary but the results of our early work are extremely encouraging.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Rachel Duffy and Andrew Fearne

In this paper, We present a framework of buyer‐supplier relationships used in an empirical study to investigate how the development of more collaborative relationships…

Abstract

In this paper, We present a framework of buyer‐supplier relationships used in an empirical study to investigate how the development of more collaborative relationships between UK retailers and fresh produce suppliers, affects the financial performance of suppliers. Relationships between key partnership characteristics and performance are described and empirically tested. In addition, multivariate analysis is used to identify the dimensions of buyer‐supplier relationships that make the greatest relative contribution to the explanation of the performance construct.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Rachel Duffy, Andrew Fearne and Victoria Healing

This paper reports the findings of a research project that investigated the extent of the information gap that exists between the British agri‐food industry and consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports the findings of a research project that investigated the extent of the information gap that exists between the British agri‐food industry and consumers to help assist the industry in its efforts to re‐connect with consumers and the wider public.

Design/methodology/approach

The first stage involved an information audit to examine the communication activities of the providers of information about food and farming, which was conducted using desk research and personal interviews. The second stage involved qualitative and quantitative primary research to examine the information needs and knowledge amongst consumers, one of the key target groups identified in the first stage of the project.

Findings

The review of the communication activities of organisations in the agri‐food industry identified an extremely fragmented delivery to consumers and a distinct lack of resources to effectively communicate the information that exists and evaluate its impact on the attitudes, perceptions and behaviour of consumers. The consumer research indicated that, while many are interested in food production issues, the fragmented communication messages that they receive are not giving them a clear reason to consider the implications of their purchases for the British farming industry and the environment.

Research limitations/implications

The information audit, whilst comprehensive, was not exhaustive, and so it is likely that some information providers may have been excluded from the review. In addition, the effectiveness of individual organisations' communication activities has not been evaluated and this presents a useful avenue for future research.

Practical implications

Owing to the limited communication budgets of individual organisations it is suggested that the industry collaborate and pool its resources to develop a co‐ordinated and effective consumer campaign for British agriculture.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to participants in the agri‐food industry as, since the publication of the Policy Commission inquiry into the future of farming and food, the subject of reconnection in the food chain has become very topical, with both industry and government representatives identifying the poor image of farming and consumers' lack of understanding of the link between food and farming as a significant problem for the industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2009

Rachel Duffy and Andrew Fearne

Farm assurance has become a market qualifier for livestock producers supplying UK supermarkets. However UK producers perceive that food safety and welfare standards…

Abstract

Purpose

Farm assurance has become a market qualifier for livestock producers supplying UK supermarkets. However UK producers perceive that food safety and welfare standards imposed on UK producers are not imposed to the same extent on livestock producers overseas, whose share of the UK market has grown steadily over the past decade. In light of these challenges this paper aims to examine the perceived role and value of farm assurance along the length of the red meat supply chain, in order to determine the potential for turning a supply chain cost into a supply chain benefit and increasing returns to UK producers.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from the key supply chain stakeholders (primary producers, processors, retailers and consumers) in the red meat industry.

Findings

The research indicates that the potential benefits of price premiums and preferential market access have not been fully captured. Findings indicate that this is due to a misalignment of the perceived value of farm assurance amongst supply chain members and the fact that consumers have a limited understanding and awareness of farm assurance. However the potential for increased benefits exists as when offered the choice between farm‐assured and non‐farm assured meat, consumers express a distinct preference and willingness to pay for the former.

Originality/value

This research is timely as there has been little attempt to assess the perceived value of farm assurance along the length of the supply chain where the views of consumers are integrated with the rest of the value chain for red meat.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nathan Gregory

All societies in the modern world are troubled by crime, and the general public is equally fascinated by criminals and fearful of criminal behaviour. In the United…

Abstract

All societies in the modern world are troubled by crime, and the general public is equally fascinated by criminals and fearful of criminal behaviour. In the United Kingdom, events such as the murders of Jack the Ripper, the Yorkshire Ripper and Harold Shipman, and the Soham tragedy, coupled with film and television programmes including Silence of the Lambs, Cracker and Crime Scene Investigation, have fuelled the public's consciousness of the criminal mind.In the fight against crime, the development of offender profiling by the FBI in the USA has further captured people's imagination. The technique was introduced to help law enforcement agencies solve serious crimes such as serial rape or murder, and to a lesser extent arson and property crime. At the heart of profiling lies the belief that by combining psychological principles with crime scene analysis, it is possible to identify the likely characteristics of a perpetrator.Although advances in crime detection are welcomed, the profiling field appears riddled with contradiction and disagreement. Social scientists argue that the discipline is unscientific due to methodologically weak research, while police officers appear sceptical about its benefits for solving crime. In Britain, profiling has witnessed both notable successes, for example Canter's profile of the serial rapist and murderer John Duffy, and dramatic failures, such as the Colin Stagg profile in the Rachel Nickell inquiry. This article reviews the offender profiling literature, examines its applicability in the legal system and identifies areas for future research.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Mohammadreza Akbari and Robert McClelland

The purpose of this research is to provide a systematic insight into corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate citizenship (CC) in supply chain development, by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide a systematic insight into corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate citizenship (CC) in supply chain development, by analyzing the current literature, contemporary concepts, data and gaps for future discipline research.

Design/methodology/approach

This research identifies information from existing academic journals and investigates research designs and methods, data analysis techniques, industry involvement and geographic locations. Information regarding university affiliation, publishers, authors, year of publication is also documented. A collection of online databases from 2001 to 2018 were explored, using the keywords “corporate social responsibility”, “corporate citizenship” and “supply chain” in their title and abstract, to deliver an inclusive listing of journal articles in this discipline area. Based on this approach, a total of 164 articles were found, and information on a chain of variables was collected.

Findings

There has been visible growth in published articles over the last 18 years regarding supply chain sustainability, CSR and CC. Analysis of the data collected shows that only five literature reviews have been published in this area. Further, key findings include 41% of publications were narrowly focused on four sectors of industry, leaving gaps in the research. 85% centered on the survey and conceptual model, leaving an additional gap for future research. Finally, developing and developed nation status should be delineated, researched and analyzed based on further segmentation of the industry by region.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to reviewing only academic and professional articles available from Emerald, Elsevier, Wiley, Sage, Taylor and Francis, Springer, Scopus, JSTOR and EBSCO containing the words “corporate social responsibility”, “corporate citizenship” and “supply chain” in the title and abstract.

Originality/value

This assessment provides an enhanced appreciation of the current practices of current research and offers further directions within the CSR and CC in supply chain sustainable development.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Celia Duffy

Proposes to examine the benefits of the Moving Pictures and Sound Cluster.

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes to examine the benefits of the Moving Pictures and Sound Cluster.

Design/methodology/approach

This short article offers a brief description of the benefits of the Moving Pictures and Sound Cluster.

Findings

Finds that the benefits were primarily in the area of sharing understanding of common issues such as copyright and planning for further development beyond the life of the projects.

Originality/value

This article is useful to those wishing to use the Moving Pictures and Sound Cluster.

Details

VINE, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2009

Rachel Fyson

Services for adults with learning disabilities are currently based on the promotion of four key principles: rights, independence, choice and social inclusion. This paper…

Abstract

Services for adults with learning disabilities are currently based on the promotion of four key principles: rights, independence, choice and social inclusion. This paper will argue that, while these principles are welcome, they need to be balanced against a fifth principle ‐ that vulnerable adults must be protected adequately against the risk of abuse. It will draw both on recent high‐profile cases of violence and abuse against people with learning disabilities and on research evidence to explore whether current plans to transform adult social care through the use of self‐directed support and individual budgets offer a safe future.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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