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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Rachel Crane

This article aims to describe the process of documenting outdoor murals of a metropolitan community in the Midwest and disseminating the information through a library…

473

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe the process of documenting outdoor murals of a metropolitan community in the Midwest and disseminating the information through a library hosted web publication.

Design/methodology/approach

The outdoor murals are surveyed and photographed by an academic fine arts librarian, the author. Access is created via a web publication, supported and developed through library resources.

Findings

The project not only increases access to works by local artists, but serves as a resource for historical images when, or if, a work becomes damaged or is removed.

Originality/value

This new pathway to public art serves as a bridge between the campus and the community.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

1168

Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Rachel Louise Wood

Through the discussion of two case studies, the purpose of this paper is to suggest that nurses may drive themselves to achieve the impossible. Professional bodies and…

592

Abstract

Purpose

Through the discussion of two case studies, the purpose of this paper is to suggest that nurses may drive themselves to achieve the impossible. Professional bodies and health care expert emphasise the importance of always putting the interests, health and wellbeing of patients first. Could this be at the expense of nurses’ health, thus limiting their capacity to provide quality care for their patients?

Design/methodology/approach

The two case studies discussed offer examples of how two nurses nearly lost their lives in their personal drive to deliver quality nursing care in adverse conditions. The paper is based upon the hypothesis that an organisation which invests in the development of a healthy workplace culture, in which staff are put first, will not only enhance the health and wellbeing of its staff, but will ultimately result in the development of a culture which will empower staff to deliver the highest quality of care.

Findings

These case studies not only offer an example of the risk of neglecting self-care, the risk to Ben and Lily who quickly changed roles from nurse to patient, but also the risk to the quality of health care as a consequence of not paying due attention to the health and wellbeing of nurses (Crane and Ward, 2016). This paper suggests a radical and no doubt controversial shift of focus. Treat nurses as patients, obsess about the quality of their care, to create a culture in which nurses are nurtured so that they can in turn, and they will, nurture their patients.

Social implications

The Royal College of Nursing, the nursing professional body and trade union for all nurses have actively campaigned for a safe and health workplace for the last three years. They support RCN Safety Representatives to work with employers to develop a safe and health working environment for Staff. An important part of this work is the Healthy You Campaign. This has resulted in a series of learning and development workshops for nurses and the development of supporting resources to empower nurses to take care of themselves (www.rcn.org.uk/healthy-workplace).

Originality/value

These case studies and the resulting discussions are the author’s own original work, and have not previously been submitted for publication elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Kathleen Gurley and Craig G. Wishart

This case study is based on an MBA team's experience in analyzing a scrap metal recycling business and developing recommendations to improve the performance of the…

Abstract

This case study is based on an MBA team's experience in analyzing a scrap metal recycling business and developing recommendations to improve the performance of the business. The company, Steel City Salvage, has three locations which are managed as separate business entities. The case focuses on the business repercussions of the poor integration across the three locations, and the team's choice of options to improve the integration. These options include changes in organizational structure, processes or culture/leadership style. The case allows students to see how their own experience and education may bias their selection of a preferred option.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Katrina Kimport

Purpose: Miscarriage is commonly understood as an involuntary, grieve-able pregnancy outcome. Abortion is commonly understood as a voluntary, if stigmatized, pregnancy

Abstract

Purpose: Miscarriage is commonly understood as an involuntary, grieve-able pregnancy outcome. Abortion is commonly understood as a voluntary, if stigmatized, pregnancy outcome that people do not typically grieve. This chapter examines a nexus of the involuntary and voluntary: how people who chose abortion following observation of a serious fetal health issue make sense of their experience and process associated emotions.

Design: The author draws on semi-structured interviews with cisgender women who had an observed serious fetal health issue and chose to terminate their pregnancy.

Findings: Findings highlight an initial prioritization of medical knowledge in pregnancy decision-making giving way, in the face of the inherent limits of medical knowability, to a focus on personal and familial values. Abortion represented a way to lessen the prospective suffering of their fetus, for many, and felt like an explicitly moral decision. Respondents felt relief after the abortion as well as a sense of loss. They processed their post-abortion emotions, including grief, in multiple ways, including through viewing – or intentionally not viewing – the remains, community rituals, private actions, and no formalized activity. Throughout respondents’ experiences, the stigmatization of abortion negatively affected their ability to obtain the care they desired and, for some, to emotionally process the overall experience.

Originality/Value: This chapter offers insight into the understudied experience of how people make sense of a serious fetal health issue and illustrates an additional facet of the stigmatization of abortion, namely how stigmatization may complicate people’s pregnancy decision-making process and their post-abortion processing.

Details

Facing Death: Familial Responses to Illness and Death
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-264-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Chris Taylor

63

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Ingrid Jeacle and Chris Carter

The paper aims to investigate accounting's role as a mediating instrument between the tensions of creativity and control within the price competitive world of the fashion…

4612

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate accounting's role as a mediating instrument between the tensions of creativity and control within the price competitive world of the fashion chain store.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a case study approach, gathering interview data from key members within a UK fashion chain, and uses Goffman's work on impression management to inform its theoretical argumentation.

Findings

Drawing on Goffman, the paper considers the roles adopted by organizational actors within fashion retailing and the actions they pursue in order to maintain a team performance. The authors suggest that accounting, as a form of stage prop, helps to sustain this team impression by mediating between the creativity and control concerns inherent in fashion design. In the process, they also gain some understanding of the use of accounting by actors beyond the confines of an organization's finance function.

Originality/value

Despite the magnitude of the fashion industry and its dominance in the identity construction of both individual and streetscape, the role of accounting within this domain of popular culture has remained remarkably unexplored. This paper attempts to redress such scholarly neglect. It also furthers an understanding of the relatively unexplored role of accounting as a mediating instrument within the complex dialectic of creativity and control.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Auto Motives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85-724234-1

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Duncan Maxwell and Rachel Couper

Construction suffers from “peculiarities” that concern the temporary natures of the construction site, project teams and unique product design. Considering the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction suffers from “peculiarities” that concern the temporary natures of the construction site, project teams and unique product design. Considering the digital transformation of construction, new solutions are being investigated that can provide consistent data between changing projects. One such source of data manifests in the tracking of logistics activities across the supply chain. Construction logistics is traditionally considered a site management activity focused solely on the “back end” of projects, but an expanded logistics focus can unlock new avenues of improvement. This study aims to understand the requirements and benefits of such a consistent thread of data.

Design/methodology/approach

From a research project with one of Australia’s largest contracting companies, this paper details a series of construction tracking tests as an empirical case study in using Bluetooth low energy aware tracking technology to capture data across the manufacture, delivery and assembly of a cross-laminated timber structural prototyping project.

Findings

The findings affirm the tracking of expanded logistics data can improve back-end performance in subsequent projects while also demonstrating the opportunity to inform a project’s unique front-end design phase. The case study demonstrates that as the reliability, range and battery life of tracking technologies improve, their incorporation into a broader range of construction activities provides invaluable data for improvement across projects.

Originality/value

As a live case study, this research offers unique insights into the potential of construction tracking to close the data loop from final site assembly back to the early project design phase, thus driving continual improvement from a holistic perspective.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Lisa S. McNeill

An individual’s identity is defined in the role that they devise for themselves, based on social positions. Examining identity motives can help in understanding what…

4844

Abstract

Purpose

An individual’s identity is defined in the role that they devise for themselves, based on social positions. Examining identity motives can help in understanding what influences one to take on a particular role. Self-esteem is one of the major motivational drivers in determining the role that an individual takes on. Individuals, through self-presentation, are said to be motivated to control the impressions others form of them. In this way, self-concept and fashion innovativeness are linked – with prior research suggesting that those with high levels of fashion innovativeness are also those with a strong sense of self. Where a gap remains, however, in exploring the direction of the relationship between self-concept and being more innovative and fashionable in clothing choices, as well as how individuals reflexively judge their own fashion choices against their perception of others – e.g. can you force yourself to be a fashion leader? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a lived experience approach to examine fashion as a tool in establishing social hierarchies amongst women. The study uses depth interviews with ten women to explore the developed self-concept of women actively engaged with fashion consumption.

Findings

The research presents a typology of fashion identities, exploring notions of security, dominance and innovativeness in self-fashioning using clothing.

Research limitations/implications

The research is exploratory, and limited to a sample of ten women. However, the study offers a number of key findings to drive future research in this area.

Practical implications

The research finds that both security of self-concept, in relation to fashion and general self-esteem, as well as insecurity, can motivate women towards fashion independence. This suggests that identity-based marketing is likely to be more successful than lifestyle-based marketing, when selling women’s fashion clothing.

Social implications

In prior research, self-concept and fashion innovativeness are linked – with prior research suggesting that those with high levels of fashion innovativeness are also those with a strong sense of self. This study finds that those with an insecure sense of self may also exhibit fashion independence, using fashion to acquire social capital.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the concept that, unlike previous notions of fashion independence and engagement with fashion, these fashion-involved categorisations of behaviour are not always driven by sophistication, confidence, creativity and low fear of risk. Instead, this study has shown that fashion innovativeness can be motivated by an overarching fear of the outcomes of being judged unfashionable.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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