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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Gabriel Abotsie, Roger Kingerlee, Andrew Fisk, Sam Watts, Rachel Cooke, Luke Woodley, Dawn Collins and Bonnie Teague

Comparatively, men have poorer physical and mental health outcomes than women, with a significantly higher suicide rate. Contributory factors are thought to be social and…

Abstract

Purpose

Comparatively, men have poorer physical and mental health outcomes than women, with a significantly higher suicide rate. Contributory factors are thought to be social and biological, leading to reduced access to health-care services. The study aims to develop and implement community-based support to increase awareness of and access to men’s mental health support networks and groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The project involved three key work-packages discussed in this paper: raising awareness of men’s mental health needs in health care, educational and community settings; collaboration between National Health Services (NHS) and non-NHS health-care support organisations to build multi-sector partnership working; and developing a supported sports-based community intervention aimed at men living with mental health conditions. The acceptability and feasibility of these work-packages were pragmatically evaluated through mixed-methods surveys and qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Overall, both community events and sports groups successfully engaged men living with mental health problems. Organisations interested in men’s mental health are continuing to engage in a partnership initiative. Community events were well-attended and received positive feedback, particularly regarding the educative and real-life experiences approach promoted in the events. The sports intervention is feasible and well-accepted by participants, who described feeling supported with their physical and mental health needs, with increased mental well-being reported.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this project are that the authors only evaluated a football group rather than all work areas. The project collected outcomes relating to participants’ demographics and qualitative reflections of participating in the football group along with a retrospective survey of perceived benefits, but the project did not undertake a pre- and post-comparison of well-being outcomes owing to low completion of these measures. Future work could focus on collecting more pre- and post-measures related to well-being, recovery and inclusion and compare these with men not involved in the football groups or public events.

Practical implications

This paper discusses the development and feasibility of setting up community-based men’s mental health support networks, involving public events, partnership working and targeted-sports interventions. All initiatives were well-received and successfully attended by men living with mental health conditions. Evaluation of the programme revealed the value placed on education about mental health and the role that community sports interventions may play in men’s mental health care.

Social implications

This project has demonstrated three different ways of supporting men’s mental health needs in the community. Community public events were held to raise awareness of men’s mental health needs and issues were well-attended and highlighted the need for health promotion and education in this area across all the communities. The men’s football group demonstrated the feasibility of moving mental health support out into a non-clinical and more community arena in a way that men engaged effectively. Finally, the creation of MensNet has bought together disparate multi-sector organisations successfully to lead public health mechanisms to support men’s mental health needs.

Originality/value

This paper describes a new multi-disciplined approach to supporting health-seeking challenges among men, in particular, how partnership working across NHS and non-NHS sectors can successfully support an identified public health need pragmatically using existing services and organisations.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Rachel Cooke

Uses historical data to examine emergent trends in media aimed at children; the intention is to detail the globalised “Bedroom Culture” phenomenon which has been…

Abstract

Uses historical data to examine emergent trends in media aimed at children; the intention is to detail the globalised “Bedroom Culture” phenomenon which has been identified in the UK and USA as signifying a move from outdoors to indoors and from active to passive pursuits. Shows how the growth of the Internet and mobile phone has not led to a reduction in television viewing, but instead to fragmentation and diversification of the children’s media market, aided by the dramatic explosion in satellite and cable TV; children interact with the different media forms in very different ways, each of them contributing to their entertainment requirements, and they can now communicate outside their traditional peer networks. Concludes that new communication channels are merely a way to reach consumers more efficiently; websites and mobile phones require high investment to induce children to use them, and must avoid appearing to be intrusive.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Adrienne Muir, Rachel Spacey, Louise Cooke and Claire Creaser

This paper aims to consider selected results from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded “Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries” (MAIPLE…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider selected results from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded “Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries” (MAIPLE) project, from 2012-2014. MAIPLE has explored the ways in which public library services manage use of the internet connections that they provide for the public. This included the how public library services balance their legal obligations and the needs of their communities in a public space and the ethical dilemmas that arise.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used a mixed-method approach involving a review of the literature, legal analysis, a questionnaire survey and case studies in five public library authorities.

Findings

UK public library services use a range of methods to regulate internet access. The research also confirms previous findings that filtering software is an ubiquitous tool for controlling access to and protecting library users from “inappropriate”, illegal and harmful internet content. There is a general, if sometimes reluctant, acceptance of filtering software as a practical tool by library staff, which seems to contrast with professional codes of ethics and attitudes in other countries. The research indicates that public library internet access will be a valued service for some time to come, but that some aspects of how public library services regulate internet access is currently managed can have socially undesirable consequences, including blocking legitimate sites and preventing users from accessing government services. Education could play a greater part in helping the general population to exercise judgement in selection of materials to view and use. This does not preclude implementing stricter controls to protect children, whilst allowing public libraries to continue providing a social good to those who are unable to otherwise participate in the digital age.

Research limitations/implications

The response to the survey was 39 per cent meaning that findings may not apply across the whole of the UK. The findings of this study are compared with and supplemented by other quantitative sources, but a strength of this study is the depth of understanding afforded by the use of case studies.

Originality/value

This paper provides both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of how internet access is managed in UK public libraries, including how library services fulfil their legal obligations and the ethical implications of how they balance their role in facilitating access to information with their perceived role as a safe and trusted environment for all members of their communities. The findings add to the international discussion on this issue and stimulate debate and policy making in the UK.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Michelle McCarthy

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Adetoun Oyelude

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Richard Poynder

Shell Research & Technology Centre, Thornton, located just outside Chester in the North of England, is home to over 700 research staff. Its brief is to service the…

Abstract

Shell Research & Technology Centre, Thornton, located just outside Chester in the North of England, is home to over 700 research staff. Its brief is to service the research needs of any part of Shell that is willing to sponsor a research project and work is undertaken in a wide range of areas, including the technologies associated with fuels, lubricants, additives, engineering and the environment. The Centre also blends the fuels and lubricants used by Michael Schumacher and the Ferrari F1 Team.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

William Cooke, Rachel Anne Tomlinson, Richard Burguete, Daniel Johns and Gaëlle Vanard

The purpose of this paper is to rigorously determine the tensile properties of a selective laser sintering (SLS) material. Emphasis was placed on the anisotropy and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to rigorously determine the tensile properties of a selective laser sintering (SLS) material. Emphasis was placed on the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the material, the repeatability of the SLS process, and the effect of age (actually moisture absorption) on the material properties.

Design/methodology/approach

Two builds of 144 dogbone tensile specimens each were tested, with 18 specimens stored for 43 days in a non‐desiccated environment before testing. Specimens were distributed throughout the build volume and aligned with the apparatus' principal axes. Tensile properties were treated statistically, using the t‐test to determine the differences between various samples.

Findings

The material was transversely isotropic in Young's modulus and strain to failure, and generally orthotropic in ultimate tensile strength. The material was inhomogeneous throughout the build volume and affected by age, with a 57 per cent reduction in University of Technology after 43 days (the changes in properties were suggested to be due to moisture absorption). Properties varied by up to 25 per cent from build‐to‐build with no change in nominal process parameters.

Research limitations/implications

It was not possible to confirm the “ageing” effect was caused by moisture absorption, and further work is suggested in this area. The causes of inhomogeneity and the effect of re‐coater action should also be studied further.

Originality/value

This is the most complete study of an SLS material's mechanical properties to date. The statistical analyses used further allow increased confidence in the conclusions drawn. This is also the only study to use cross‐fill scanning to produce specimens, and, therefore, isolate the effect of the re‐coater action.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Carl Senior, Hannah Smyth, Richard Cooke, Rachel L. Shaw and Elizabeth Peel

To describe the utility of three of the main cognitive neuroscientific techniques currently in use within the neuroscience community, and how they can be applied to the…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the utility of three of the main cognitive neuroscientific techniques currently in use within the neuroscience community, and how they can be applied to the emerging field of neuromarket research.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief development of functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation are described, as the core principles are behind their respective use. Examples of actual data from each of the brain imaging techniques are provided to assist the neuromarketer with subsequent data for interpretation. Finally, to ensure the neuromarketer has an understanding of the experience of neuroimaging, qualitative data from a questionnaire exploring attitudes about neuroimaging techniques are included which summarize participants' experiences of having a brain scan.

Findings

Cognitive neuroscientific techniques have great utility in market research and can provide more “honest” indicators of consumer preference where traditional methods such as focus groups can be unreliable. These techniques come with complementary strengths which allow the market researcher to converge onto a specific research question. In general, participants considered brain imaging techniques to be relatively safe. However, care is urged to ensure that participants are positioned correctly in the scanner as incorrect positioning is a stressful factor during an imaging procedure that can impact data quality.

Originality/value

This paper is an important and comprehensive resource to the market researcher who wishes to use cognitive neuroscientific techniques.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Rachel Spacey, Louise Cooke, Adrienne Muir and Claire Creaser

The purpose of this paper is to review current knowledge, research and thinking about the difficulties facing public libraries offering internet access to their users in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current knowledge, research and thinking about the difficulties facing public libraries offering internet access to their users in ensuring legally compliant and non-offensive use of this facility whilst still adhering to the professional value of freedom of access to information.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of recently published sources (1997-2013) relating to the technical and organisational measures used to manage public internet access primarily in public libraries in the UK with some limited international examples were reviewed and analysed. This work was undertaken as the underpinning research for an AHRC-funded project, MAIPLE (Managing Access to the internet in Public Libraries).

Findings

The provision of public internet access is a well-established component of the role of public libraries, but is seen as a potential problem due to the possibility of misuse, and it appears that simplistic technical solutions have disappointed. Legislation increases the need for more effective solutions that can provide a balance between the need for legal compliance, a welcoming environment for users, and the protection of key freedoms. A range of measures are being adopted worldwide in response to this dilemma.

Originality/value

Research exploring internet access in public libraries and its management in the UK is numerically small and much of it dates back to the start of the twenty-first century. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of the available literature and is of relevance to practitioners and academics in the fields of public librarianship.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Karen Landay and Rachel E. Frieder

Stress and the military go hand-in-hand, particularly in combat environments. While some personality traits or types weaken relationships between stress and performance…

Abstract

Stress and the military go hand-in-hand, particularly in combat environments. While some personality traits or types weaken relationships between stress and performance, others, such as psychopathy, may strengthen them. In the present chapter, we consider the ramifications of individuals with high levels of psychopathy or psychopathic tendencies in the military with regard to both their own stress and performance and that of those around them. We discuss different reactions to psychological and physical stress, as well as the implications of psychopathic tendencies as they relate to current military issues, including gender, leadership, teamwork, turnover, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicide. By juxtaposing relevant research findings on stress and psychopathy, we conclude that psychopathic tendencies should have neither uniformly negative nor positive effects on stress and performance in the military. Rather, effects on such individuals and the peripheral others with whom they interact will likely vary greatly depending on numerous factors.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

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