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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Abstract

Details

Citizen Responsive Government
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-029-6

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Rachel Ashworth, Tom Entwistle, Julian Gould‐Williams and Michael Marinetto

This monograph contains abstracts from the 2005 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference Cardiff Business School,Cardiff University, 6‐7th September 2005

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Abstract

This monograph contains abstracts from the 2005 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, 6‐7th September 2005

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Abstract

Details

Citizen Responsive Government
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-029-6

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Rachel Craven and Lyn Shelton

This study aims to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the Mindfulness module of the “I Can Feel Good” programme, an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the Mindfulness module of the “I Can Feel Good” programme, an adapted dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) informed skills programme for a group of intellectually disabled offenders (IDOs).

Design/methodology/approach

The programme module was delivered to a group of five male IDOs detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 (Revised 2007) at an intellectual disability (ID) rehabilitation hospital based in the UK. The mindfulness module was 12 sessions in length, and it was evaluated using the emotional problems scale (EPS) and the cognitive and affective mindfulness scale-revised (CAMS-R) self-assessment and observational scale. These measures were administered pre- and post-module and used the staff report scales as a primary source of evaluation.

Findings

Non-parametric testing revealed that there was a reduction in scores post module on the externalising behaviour problem scale of the EPS and increased scores on the CAMS-R observational scale, which would indicate clinical improvement in the IDO’s behavioural presentation, although it was not statistically significant. The internalising behaviour problem scale showed increased signs of anxiety post module, this could be related to increased self-awareness. The CAMS-R self-reported measure indicated reduced mindfulness qualities following the module.

Originality/value

The results indicate that following the mindfulness module, there was a reduced level of challenging behaviour displayed by the patients with increased signs of emotional regulation. There was also an observed reduction in symptoms of depression and low self-esteem post module.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Annette van den Berg, Arjen van Witteloostuijn and Olivier Van der Brempt

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether works councils (WCs) in Belgium have a positive effect on firm performance, notably productivity and profitability, while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether works councils (WCs) in Belgium have a positive effect on firm performance, notably productivity and profitability, while taking the role of trade unions into account.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first introduce the typical Belgian industrial relations system, discussing the similarities and differences with neighboring countries. This is followed by a brief overview of the relevant literature. Subsequently, the impact of Belgian employee representation on firm performance is estimated by means of OLS, using a newly developed questionnaire administered among Belgian CEOs. Special attention is given to moderating and mediating effects.

Findings

The authors find that Belgian WCs have a small (direct) significantly positive effect on labor productivity, but not on profitability. The additional results of the mediation test show tentatively that WCs might affect profitability indirectly, through their impact on productivity. Despite trade unions’ dominance in practice, the findings reveal that their impact is insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

Although nationwide, rich and representative, as well as statistically valid, the data set is rather small (196 usable observations). The data set offers ample opportunities to further explore what makes effective Belgian WCs different from their non-effective counterparts.

Originality/value

The data set is unique, and combines subjective CEO with objective performance data. The data offer the opportunity to do a first study into the special case of Belgium, which has a distinct union-dominated IR regime. In this study, the focus is furthermore on the rarely studied WC-trade union interaction. In addition, subtle moderation and mediation effects are estimated.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Rachael Raine

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of dark tourists through an investigation of people's motivations to visit burial grounds. This research extends Stone's…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of dark tourists through an investigation of people's motivations to visit burial grounds. This research extends Stone's Dark Tourism Spectrum and Seven Dark Suppliers framework by identifying nine types of dark tourists.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study approach was selected where 23 interviews were conducted at three burial grounds. Interview transcripts were analysed in order to identify emerging themes in motives and experiences of dark tourism consumers. The sites selected were Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, London, St Mary's Graveyard, Whitby, and Weaste Cemetery, Salford.

Findings

From this research a Dark Tourist Spectrum has been formulated which presents a typology of the dark tourist. The spectrum identifies different categories of visitors identified at the burial grounds, ranging from “darkest” to “lightest” tourists.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research regard time and resource constraints. This affected the sample size of participants for interview and the selection of sites as case studies.

Originality/value

This study begins to fill the gap in research on people's motivations to visit sites that lie within the mid‐shades of Stone's Dark Tourism Spectrum, specifically burial grounds. This research contributes to a deeper understanding of dark tourism consumption with a new model presented in the form of a Dark Tourist Spectrum.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Helen Johnson, Neil Gredecki and Fiona Rachel Wilks-Riley

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “spotlight” on the literature relating the selection, recruitment and development of staff working in personality disorder (PD) services.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a “spotlight” on the literature relating the selection, recruitment and development of staff working in personality disorder (PD) services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews key documentation in the field of PD practice in relation to staff.

Findings

Despite the publication of guidelines for working with PD clients, a number of large scale enquiries suggest that some services have often failed to absorb and implement the recommendations made which has resulted in serious consequences.

Practical implications

A number of considerations relating to enhancing staff competency when working in PD units are presented.

Originality/value

The review outlines a number of good practice guidelines relating to the different stages of recruitment and employment for staff working with PD clients.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Ruth Simpson and Rachel Morgan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “gendering” of contamination in the context of COVID-19 where “gendering” is taken to include other, cross-cutting areas of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “gendering” of contamination in the context of COVID-19 where “gendering” is taken to include other, cross-cutting areas of disadvantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on secondary sources to explore gender and COVID-19.

Findings

The authors show that contamination is rooted in structural disadvantage, reproducing classed, gendered and racial difference in terms of how it is encountered and experienced.

Practical implications

This “thought piece” suggests a greater awareness of how pandemics and other public health emergencies impact of structural disadvantages.

Originality/value

This “thought piece” applies notions of taint to a contemporary pandemic that has had far-reaching consequences for issues of equality.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Rachel Ashman and Delia Vazquez

The purpose of this paper is to identify how pure‐play fashion retailers can simulate attachment to their web sites (through trust, loyalty and purchase intentions) by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how pure‐play fashion retailers can simulate attachment to their web sites (through trust, loyalty and purchase intentions) by using different communication mediums (static image, moving image, and text/image combination) to overcome the intangible nature of the online sales environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling using AMOS 16.0 are used to test 12 hypothesized relationships generated from the literature review. A sample of 688 female young fashion consumers from The University of Manchester participated in this study.

Findings

There is a clear difference in the build up of attachment when a consumer shops for products communicated via a static or moving image. Static images have direct relationships with trust and purchase intention, whereas moving images are related to building loyalty. Analysis shows that product recommendations (using a combination of text and image) are found to be directly related to developing consumer trust and loyalty towards a pure‐play fashion retailer.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of results is limited due to the use of a student sample and the focus on the UK fashion industry. Further development of the constructs used in this study is needed to further test the conceptual model.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to empirically study pure‐play fashion retailing, providing insightful and pragmatic advice by identifying which communication mediums foster trusting and loyal relationships with consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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