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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Rachel A. August and Tracy L. Tuten

The need for greater representation of women in the Korean workforce is a critical issue, as evidenced by the scarcity of women in managerial positions. Women make up only 7 per…

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Abstract

The need for greater representation of women in the Korean workforce is a critical issue, as evidenced by the scarcity of women in managerial positions. Women make up only 7 per cent of the managerial and executive workforce. Using the notion of opportunity structures, suggests that the Korean Government has played a key role in limiting the progress of Korean women workers. Examines that role empirically via a sample of employed Korean women. The data indicate that some government acts, such as ratification of laws including a quota system and maternity leave, have expanded Korean women’s career opportunities. Yet the lack of numerous other laws including those promoting equal employment opportunities, equal pay, denouncing sexual harassment, and more, have limited women’s opportunities. Highlights the Korean Government’s role in women’s career growth and discuss actions the Government could take to increase women’s opportunities and enable them to reach managerial levels.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Rachel A. August

This paper seeks to identify the meanings associated with retirement for a longitudinal sample of women immediately prior to and following their official retirement. Contextual…

1041

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify the meanings associated with retirement for a longitudinal sample of women immediately prior to and following their official retirement. Contextual factors which shape those meanings are also described.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews, based on a series of interview guides were conducted with a sample of 14 women in their pre‐ and post‐retirement years. The data were coded using a grounded theory approach and typology classification schemes.

Findings

Retirement was alternately conceptualized as a new period of life affording freedoms and growth, as a natural final phase, as a frightening period due to losses, and/or as a pinnacle of accomplishment or relief. The contextual influences of family, friends, and unique attributes of one's profession (e.g. having jobs with transferrable skills and/or having physically demanding jobs) help create meanings. Finally, meanings were found to shift over time in concert with changing contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Women have a wide range of responses to their own retirement. The stereotype that they will easily replace the work role with family and/or household roles does not hold for all.

Practical implications

By truly understanding the particulars of each employee's situation, managers can assist employees in the transition into retirement such that it is a smooth one. Managers might also be able to more immediately identify employees, who would be willing to return to the organization in a consulting or short‐term capacity following retirement.

Originality/value

The longitudinal data offers a unique vantage point, such that meanings can be traced over time in a way that has not yet been documented in empirical work.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Tracy L. Tuten and Rachel A. August

Among the most consistent predictors of work‐family conflict for working parents are the number of hours worked, job role autonomy, and degree of support managers offer parents…

1984

Abstract

Purpose

Among the most consistent predictors of work‐family conflict for working parents are the number of hours worked, job role autonomy, and degree of support managers offer parents. Yet, little is known about the unique work experiences of lesbian women in terms of work‐family conflict. This paper seeks to identify correlates of work‐family conflict, specifically work interference with family (WIF), among lesbian mothers and identifies the role that being “out” at work plays in their experience of WIF.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 58 working lesbian mothers engaged in long‐term, same‐sex relationships that they categorized as a family was used to collect data on constructs related to work‐family conflict and related variables. The vast majority of the sample were managers or professionals.

Findings

Analyses indicate that increased job role autonomy, fewer hours worked, and increased managerial support are associated with less overall WIF. Additionally, the extent to which participants are “out” at work is associated with reduced WIF, and explains variance beyond the other constructs examined.

Practical implications

Managers can play an essential role in helping reduce WIF among lesbian women via formal steps including offering written support for non‐discrimination policies and benefits for domestic partners. Managers can also take more informal steps such as role modeling acceptance. Finally, managers can modify features of the work environment and jobs themselves.

Originality/value

Being “out” at work can be advantageous for lesbian workers as a strategy for ameliorating WIF. Managers are in a position to make this kind of disclosure possible.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

877

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2023

Jeremy R. Franks, Jessica Hepburn and Rachel S.E. Peden

This study aims to explore the impacts of long-term trends in the closure of abattoir businesses in the UK on the robustness of the network of abattoirs which provides private…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the impacts of long-term trends in the closure of abattoir businesses in the UK on the robustness of the network of abattoirs which provides private kill services.

Design/methodology/approach

This proof-of-concept study uses responses from a farmer and an abattoir survey in a spatial analysis to help visualise the private kill network. Monte Carlo simulation is used to estimate the impacts of possible further closures of private kill abattoirs on the robustness of the private kill network.

Findings

In August 2020, 18% of the area of the UK was more than 45 km from a private kill abattoir, 21% was serviced by one, 14% by two and 47% by three or more abattoirs. After randomly removing 9 and 18% of private kill abattoirs, to reflect the current trend in the closure of private kill abattoirs, the area of the UK more than 45 km from a private kill service and the areas with one and two providers increased, whilst the area with three or more providers decreased for each scenario. This approach, therefore, can be used to quantify the network's resilience to further closures.

Research limitations/implications

The additional information that would be needed to allow this approach to help policymakers identify strategically valuable abattoir businesses is discussed.

Originality/value

No other national or international study has attempted to quantify the robustness of the network of private kill abattoirs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Rachel Wakefield, Noel McGrath and Terence Holliday

Standard one of the national service framework for mental health (DH, 1999) requires health and social services to promote social inclusion for all. Users of secure services are…

Abstract

Standard one of the national service framework for mental health (DH, 1999) requires health and social services to promote social inclusion for all. Users of secure services are, arguably, the most excluded of all those in the care of mental health services and thus the most in need of active social inclusion. Yet they are the least able to participate in the community‐based programmes that would help them re‐engage with ordinary living following discharge. In this article Rachel Wakefield and colleagues describe the obstacles they had to overcome to introduce a socially inclusive resettlement programme for service users in the low secure unit where they work.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Lawrence Hazelrigg

Ridley Scott’s 1982 cinematic production of Blade Runner, based loosely on a 1968 story by Philip Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), is read within a general context of…

Abstract

Ridley Scott’s 1982 cinematic production of Blade Runner, based loosely on a 1968 story by Philip Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), is read within a general context of critical theory, the purpose being twofold: first, to highlight the film’s fit with, and within, several issues that have been important to critical theory and, second, to explore some questions, criticisms, and extensions of those issues – the dialectic of identity/difference most crucially – by speculations within and on the film’s text. The exploration is similar in approach to studies of specific films within the context of issues of social, cultural, and political theory conducted by the late Stanley Cavell. Interrogations of dimensions of scenarios and sequences of plotline, conceptual pursuit of some implications, and assessments of the realism at work in cinematic format are combined with mainly descriptive evaluations of character portrayals and dynamics as these relate to specified thematics of the identity/difference dialectic. The film puts in relief evolving meanings of prosthetics – which is to say changes in the practical as well as conceptual-semantic boundaries of “human being”: what counts as “same” versus “other”? “domestic” versus “foreign”? “integrity” versus “dissolution”? “safety” versus “danger”? And how do those polarities, understood within a unity-of-opposites dialectic, change, as human beings are confronted more and more stressfully by their own reproductions of “environment” – that is, the perspectival device of “what is ‘text’ and what is context’?” – and variations of that device by direct and indirect effects of human actions, as those actions have unfolded within recursive sequences of prior versions of perspectival device, a device repeatedly engaged, albeit primarily and mainly implicitly, as a “prosthetic that could not be a prosthetic.”

Article
Publication date: 15 April 2021

Katherine McKee and Jackie Bruce

The Oaks Leadership Scholars engage in a year-long program grounded in transformative leadership and framed by Project Based Learning to develop identities as advocates and…

Abstract

The Oaks Leadership Scholars engage in a year-long program grounded in transformative leadership and framed by Project Based Learning to develop identities as advocates and activists. Analysis of Scholars’ reflections throughout the year indicate increased representation of their selves as advocates and activists over time and identifies significant events – such as a museum tour and engagement in their year-long project – in the program year. The findings of the study indicate that The Student Leader Activist Identity Continuum is an effective way to conceptualize the year and when paired with intentional teaching of transformative leadership, and can impact Scholars’ concept of self in relation to justice and equity work. The findings of this study indicate areas for future study and could inform curriculum revisions.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2013

Jennifer Thomson

This chapter examines the historical development of different conceptions of health among environmental activists in the postwar United States.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the historical development of different conceptions of health among environmental activists in the postwar United States.

Methodology/approach

The historical analysis combines archival research with oral history interviews.

Findings

This study argues that applications of “health” to describe the environment are more diverse than generally acknowledged, and that environmental activists were at the forefront of connecting the two terms within broader public discourse.

Originality/value of chapter

This study provides a historical context for understanding the contemporary diversity of perspectives on the links between ecology and health. It illustrates the cross-fertilization between scientists, philosophers, and environmental activists in the 1970s that led to this contemporary diversity.

Details

Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-323-0

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corbynism: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-372-0

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