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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Rachael Lindsay, Thomas W. Jackson and Louise Cooke

In light of a growing trend towards mobile information management and a UK governmental drive for police forces to implement mobile technologies and realise significant…

Abstract

Purpose

In light of a growing trend towards mobile information management and a UK governmental drive for police forces to implement mobile technologies and realise significant benefits, it is important to examine the factors affecting officer acceptance. There appears to be little understanding of the key factors, yet this is critical to the success of the initiative. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main factors that influence the usage of mobile technologies amongst police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, partially ethnographic design was followed to allow an in‐depth exploration of this issue. The study was based on a mixed‐methods longitudinal evaluation study of the implementation of mobile technologies within a UK police force over a nine‐month period. The technology acceptance model (TAM) and the subsequent TAM2 and TAM3, were then reengineered to provide a suitable theoretical model for a mobile policing context.

Findings

In total, four main categories of officer acceptance factors were identified: officer performance, security/reliability, management style and cognitive acceptance. Evidence from the study showed a key shortfall in all three versions of the TAM in that they focus on the user perspective and did not confirm the broader organisational factors within the implementation and social contexts of mobile policing.

Originality/value

Consequently, an adapted mobile‐TAM (m‐TAM) was produced that incorporated these factors into the existing TAM elements. The high‐level nature of the adapted model for mobile policing means it could be applied by other police forces and potentially other organisations, regardless of the type of mobile device implemented, to address the barriers to acceptance. The m‐TAM addresses the need for a more relevant and robust model to the mobile policing paradigm, which goes beyond the static technology environment in which the TAM2 and TAM3 were built.

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Rachel Louise Geesa, Kat R. McConnell, Nicholas Patrick Elam and Ellie Clark

Education doctoral (EdD) students (mentees) typically hold full-time leadership positions in education-related fields while completing their degree. The types of support…

Abstract

Purpose

Education doctoral (EdD) students (mentees) typically hold full-time leadership positions in education-related fields while completing their degree. The types of support these scholar-practitioners need is unique because of their focus on balancing full-time work, academic, and personal needs. This study aims to explore mentor support systems for mentees in their first and second year of the EdD program through a group mentoring program, which is designed to provide resources and access to mentors to promote successful degree completion in five years or less.

Design/methodology/approach

Mentors participated in monthly presentations and discussions with mentees throughout the 2018–2019 academic year, which were video recorded. At the end of the academic year, mentors partook in an interview or focus group meeting.

Findings

Themes emerged related to mentors’ focus on the dissertation process; emphasis on outreach for support; discussions and work/life balance; selection of presentation topics; perceptions of networking opportunities with mentees; desire to build stronger connections with mentees; and concerns/opinions about the mentoring format.

Research limitations/implications

The design of a mentoring program for EdD mentees varies throughout the doctorate degree pathway. Mentors support mentees in their doctoral journey through presentations and discussions about relevant topics during their first two years in the doctoral program. Additional studies are needed regarding EdD mentoring programs for students in the third year to the completion of the degree.

Originality/value

Few studies exist related to mentoring programs for scholar-practitioners in EdD programs. Results from this research provide EdD faculty and advisors insights to group mentoring and discussion topics for first and second year EdD students, based on the mentors’ perspectives.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Lorna Saunder

The purpose of this paper is to explore a method of incorporating on-line role play in mental health nursing education. Recreation of meaningful and realistic simulations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a method of incorporating on-line role play in mental health nursing education. Recreation of meaningful and realistic simulations for mental health nurses is challenging. Examination of the literature reveals there is a gap in the provision of simulations that replicate practice, encourage the development of skills and promote responsibility. Those that exist may require significant investment in complex technologies or a high degree of planning and time commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluation of a pedagogical design that used an on-line survey to gather responses and thematic analysis was undertaken.

Findings

The findings identified that students engaged with the case leading to a realistic experience of case management and development of professional communication skills.

Research limitations/implications

This evaluation could be expanded further to a more formal study examining the students’ emotional responses and learning as they progress through the activity.

Practical implications

The activity outlined in this paper demonstrates that a relatively simple approach can result in deep learning whereby the student can fully experience the role of a qualified practitioner. This model could easily be adopted by other higher education institutions or as a part of continuing professional development.

Originality/value

This paper combines previously researched methods of providing role play to mental health nursing students. It has addressed the critiques of other methodologies such as being time consuming, expensive or lacking in realism. The end product, is low cost, manageable from the lecturers perspective and delivers important learning outcomes to the students.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Rachel Craven and Lyn Shelton

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are known to experience increased emotional and behavioural concerns. The study aims to assess whether detained ID patients…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are known to experience increased emotional and behavioural concerns. The study aims to assess whether detained ID patients with a forensic history (IDPF) have increased difficulty managing their impulse control in comparison to detained ID patients without a forensic history (IDP). Using the externalising behaviour problems (EBP) subscale of the EPS, the study aims to compare the differences between the IDFP and IDP groups.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 60 patients with ID detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 (Revised 2007) were assessed using the behaviour rating scale of the EPS. The outcome scores of the EBP were used to examine any observed differences between the scores of forensically involved patients [n = 34] and those without a forensic history [n = 26]. It was hypothesised that patients with a forensic history would display higher scoring on externalised behavioural problems (EBP) than patients without such a history.

Findings

Non-parametric testing revealed that there were no significant differences in EBP scoring between the two sample groups. These findings indicate that, for patients in the present study, no differences were detected in the presentation of these two distinct groups. In fact, with the exception of the verbal aggression subscale of the EBP, the other three subscales (physical aggression, non-compliance and hyperactivity) show that actually the IDP group displayed the higher ranked means in these subscales when compared with the forensically involved group.

Originality/value

These results indicate possible increased treatment needs within the IDP group and question whether offending history is necessarily a reliable predictor of ongoing hostility and behavioural concerns within similar inpatient services.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Abstract

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Lindsay McCunn and Cara Frey

Trending in modern interior design frameworks is an integration of real and simulated (i.e. photographs, murals) elements of nature into buildings, and a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

Trending in modern interior design frameworks is an integration of real and simulated (i.e. photographs, murals) elements of nature into buildings, and a number of interdisciplinary studies concern the effects of nature on various aspects of human functioning. The purpose of this paper is to measure employees’ self-reported levels of affective organizational commitment (AOC), perceived productivity, well-being, attention restoration and satisfaction at work to explore how each mural is conceptualized and to make recommendations to hospital administrators and facilities managers as they make decisions concerning mural design and placement. One hospital had a biophilic mural and the other had a bold abstract mural.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out using post-occupancy evaluation and mixed-methods survey design.

Findings

Employees in both hospitals disagreed that their organizational commitment (OC), perceived productivity or well-being at work had improved since the new murals had been installed. Responses from both hospitals were also low concerning perceptions of attention restoration. Indeed, no significant differences between hospitals were found. Correlations among scales were found within hospitals that support published studies. More correlations occurred at the hospital where employees viewed the biophilic mural (e.g. between OC and perceived productivity, and between satisfaction with the physical environment and perceived productivity). At both sites, satisfaction with the physical environment correlated with OC.

Originality/value

The authors expected that those working within view of the biophilic mural would report stronger ratings of AOC, perceived productivity, well-being, attention restoration and satisfaction with the workplace than employees with a view of the abstract scene. No differences between groups were found; responses to psychosocial scale items asking about whether attitudes had improved after the retrofit were low or neutral for employees in either hospital. However, more correlations between scales that support existing literature were revealed for those working near the biophilic mural. Thus, the authors recommend architectural programming before a design change to gather insight on occupants’ preferences at work.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Rachael Clawson, Anne Patterson, Rachel Fyson and Michelle McCarthy

The purpose of this study is to compare the UK demographics of forced marriage of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities to inform…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare the UK demographics of forced marriage of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities to inform effective safeguarding practice.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of all cases of forced marriage reported to the UK Government’s Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) between 2009 and 2015.

Findings

People with learning disabilities are at five times greater risk of forced marriage than people without learning disabilities. Men and women with learning disabilities are equally likely to be forced to marry, whereas amongst the general population, women are more likely than men to be forced to marry. Patterns of ethnicity, geographic location within the UK and reporters are the same for people with and without learning disabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is based on cases reported to the FMU, and for some cases, data held was incomplete. More importantly, many cases go unreported and so the FMU data does not necessarily reflect all cases of forced marriage in the UK.

Practical implications

Forced marriage of people with learning disabilities is a safeguarding issue. Practitioners across health, education, criminal justice and social care need to better understand the risk of forced marriage for people with learning disabilities. Links to practice resources developed as part of the wider project are provided.

Originality/value

This is the first time that researchers have been given access to FMU data and the first time that a statistical analysis of cases of forced marriage involving someone with a learning disability have been analysed.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Shaw Tearle, Sam S. and Rachel R. Holt

There is a need to evaluate an adapted Equipping Youth to help One Another (EQUIP) programme for people with intellectual disabilities and forensic needs. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to evaluate an adapted Equipping Youth to help One Another (EQUIP) programme for people with intellectual disabilities and forensic needs. The purpose of this paper is to explore a service user’s experience of completing the intervention as part of their transition into the community.

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative case report was used. Following hospital discharge and completion of the adapted EQUIP programme, one service user with mild intellectual disability was supported to share their treatment experiences using participatory action research.

Findings

Findings suggest that while the adapted community EQUIP group can support skills acquisition (e.g. problem-solving), discharge processes and community reintegration, professionals need to maintain a person-centred approach mindful of participants’ complex emotional journeys.

Research limitations/implications

The design allows for tentative conclusions to be made about the service user’s journey and is not necessarily generalisable.

Practical implications

There is a pressing need to develop the evidence base for interventions offered in the community to people with intellectual disabilities and a history of offending. This report provides some evidence that EQUIP can be adapted to support this population.

Originality/value

This is the first coproduced publication exploring the experience of a service user with intellectual disability who completed an adapted EQUIP programme.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Interview by Rachel Brown

The aim of this paper is to determine the views of Jim Kouzes, the chairman emeritus of the Tom Peters Company, a leadership development firm.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the views of Jim Kouzes, the chairman emeritus of the Tom Peters Company, a leadership development firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an interview with Jim Kouzes..

Findings

Jim Kouzes has been cited by the Wall Street Journal as one of the 12 most requested “non university executive‐educated providers” to US companies. The interview covers his opinions on a range of issues.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into the thinking of a prominent individual.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Rachel Worthington and Sarah Rossetti

Public attitudes are considered influential in the successful reintegration of offenders into society after release, however research into attitudes towards offenders with…

Abstract

Purpose

Public attitudes are considered influential in the successful reintegration of offenders into society after release, however research into attitudes towards offenders with intellectual disability (ID) has received little attention. The purpose of this study is firstly to see if people hold differing attitudes towards the reintegration of offenders with ID compared to those without ID and secondly, to investigate whether this difference in attitude is because of differing implicit theories of intelligence (TOI). The effects of familiarity with ID were also measured.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 200 participants read crime vignettes depicting crimes committed by offenders with and without ID and completed Dweck’s “TOI” scale.

Findings

Participants were found to have greater entity views of intelligence towards ID yet displayed more positive attitudes towards their reintegration than offenders without ID. The influence of demographics was mixed. It would appear attitudes towards offenders with ID are not as negative as initially thought.

Research limitations/implications

Implications of these findings are discussed in terms of desistance and community integration.

Practical implications

While some care must be taken when interpreting the results, this study demonstrates positive results regarding the reintegration of offenders with ID. Attitudes may be changing for the better towards those with disabilities, which is positive in terms of the government and National Health Service (NHS) objectives to reintegrate people with ID successfully back into the community. Although limited in number, it is noted that community forensic mental health teams have been effective in managing offender risk and providing good quality care (Dinani,et al.,2010; Benton and Roy, 2008). They can provide more person-centred and specialist treatments options and have links with other community services, probation and the police (Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2014).

Social implications

Community care is thought to lead to more timely treatments with more accessible support teams and services that those with ID would struggle to access in prison (Bradley, 2009). It can also lead to greater well-being and support as individuals are in a less restrictive environment and are closer to their social networks, acting as a protective factor against further reoffending (Benton & Roy, 2008; Bradley, 2009). Furthermore, it has been indicated significant financial savings would be achieved for the criminal justice system by reducing inpatient care and increasing community services and sentences, in addition to reducing the demand on prison spaces (Bradley, 2009; Benton & Roy, 2008).

Originality/value

To date, very few studies have used TOI to examine attitudes towards offenders, with none examining attitudes towards offenders with ID.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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