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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Rabi S. Bhagat, Balaji Krishnan, Terry A. Nelson, Karen Moustafa Leonard, David L. Ford and Tejinder K. Billing

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating roles of two distinct styles of coping and decision latitude on the relationship between three facets of role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating roles of two distinct styles of coping and decision latitude on the relationship between three facets of role stress and psychological strain in six national contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of the research is to examine the relative predictive efficacies of three theory specific moderators in six countries which differ on the cultural dimension of individualism‐collectivism. The data are analyzed using moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that problem‐focused coping is a better moderator in the individualistic countries and that emotion‐focused coping is a better moderator in the collectivistic contexts. None of the three moderators moderate the relationships in Germany and South Africa – the two countries which had scores in the mid‐range of the individualism‐collectivism continuum. Findings are discussed for their significance into the interplay of cultural variations and coping with work stress in predicting psychological strain or distress on the job.

Practical implications

Practical implications for managing human resources in various subsidiaries of multinational and global organizations are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper confirms existing theories and expands the authors’ understanding of role stress and psychological strain in different cultural contexts.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2007

Rabi S. Bhagat, Harry C. Triandis, B. Ram Baliga, Tejinder K. Billing and Charlotte A. Davis

The schematic diagram shown in Fig. 1 suggests that a global mindset evolves in the cultural context of industry-specific, organization-specific, and person-specific…

Abstract

The schematic diagram shown in Fig. 1 suggests that a global mindset evolves in the cultural context of industry-specific, organization-specific, and person-specific antecedents that are salient in the context of the global manager and the environment in which he or she functions. Taken clockwise, we discuss the relevance of various factors that comprise these three important domains and how these domains interact with the overarching cultural contexts salient in the domestic as well as in the international business environment. In Table 1, we present the various factors in industry-specific, organization-specific, and person-specific domains that either facilitate (provide opportunities) or hinder (act as constraints) the development of global mindset and global managers.

Details

The Global Mindset
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1402-7

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Tejinder K. Billing, Rabi S. Bhagat and Emin Babakus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of the emphasis placed by individuals on scheduling of activities on the relationship between task…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of the emphasis placed by individuals on scheduling of activities on the relationship between task structure and work outcomes (i.e. job satisfaction and job involvement).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using surveys from 387 employees working in US‐based organizations. Regression analyses were used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results of the study show that for individuals who place high emphasis on scheduling of work and non‐work activities, the negative impact of highly structured tasks was weaker than for individuals who do not emphasize scheduling of activities. The results also provide support for the hypotheses concerning the direct relationships between task structure and work outcomes.

Originality/value

Past research has largely ignored the role of individual differences in examining task structure. By providing empirical support for the moderating role of emphasis on scheduling on the task structure outcome relationships, this study not only paves the way for future studies but also emphasizes the importance of incorporating the role of time in examining task structure.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2002

Rabi S. Bhagat, David L. Ford, Coy A. Jones and Robert R. Taylor

The concept of organizational knowledge, as a major determinant for global competitiveness, has received significant attention in recent years. In this paper, we discuss…

Abstract

The concept of organizational knowledge, as a major determinant for global competitiveness, has received significant attention in recent years. In this paper, we discuss the importance of managing human resource knowledge to enhance the effectiveness of global corporations. A theoretical framework is proposed for understanding the effectiveness of knowledge management processes as a function of strategic considerations, administrative heritage, and technical systems, as embedded in the cultural context of the society. Later, we propose that individualistic vs. collectivistic cultures process the various types of knowledge differently, and prefer different modes of knowledge conversion based on their cultural values. Implications for international human resource management are discussed.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-973-3

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Ronald J. Burke

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews some previous literature on cross‐cultural understanding of occupational stress and well‐being, why such research is difficult to undertake, and summarizes the five original manuscripts that comprise this special issue.

Findings

Manuscripts in this special issue represent authors from several countries and report data collected from over a dozen countries. Some contributions attempt to replicate previous North American and European research findings in other countries while others undertake comparative studies of two or more countries.

Originality/value

It is important to undertake more cross‐cultural comparative research of the effects of occupational stress and well‐being to determine whether any boundary conditions exist for previous results based in North American and European samples. In addition, future research should include assessments of some national culture values.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Joanne Roberts and Christoph Dörrenbächer

Abstract

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2007

Abstract

Details

The Global Mindset
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1402-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Abbas Ali and Daniel F. Twomey

This article investigates personal value systems in Iraq, in a sample of managers. The results indicate that the dominant values are those that compose the…

Abstract

This article investigates personal value systems in Iraq, in a sample of managers. The results indicate that the dominant values are those that compose the outward‐directed category: tribalistic, conformist and socio‐centred. In comparison American managers score high on manipulated values and the inner‐directed category is dominant. The results are discussed in relation to changes in Iraqi society and the functions of management.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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