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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Anuradha Pandya, Wayne van Zijl and Warren Maroun

The objective of this research is to explore the challenges being encountered when applying and implementing fair value accounting requirements, focusing specifically on…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to explore the challenges being encountered when applying and implementing fair value accounting requirements, focusing specifically on the determination of fair value per International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 13: Fair value measurement (IFRS 13) in the South African capital market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 20 detailed interviews, primarily with preparers and interpretively analysed to identify how individuals internalise the requirements of IFRS 13 and the challenges associated with its application. The researchers focus specifically on South Africa because of its status as a developing economy and, at the same time, its extensive experience in applying IFRS.

Findings

South African preparers appear reluctant to change from a conventional cost-based measurement approach to one grounded in fair value. Primary concerns include the perceived usefulness of fair value accounting and its conceptual appropriateness, given its perceived de-emphasis of the traditional stewardship role of financial reporting. Related challenges to the application of IFRS 13 include concerns about the cost of determining fair value; the inherent subjectivity of fair value measures and the practical difficulty of calculating fair values when markets are not efficient or where business environments are complex and dynamic where Level 1 inputs are not widely available for all assets and liabilities. These challenges encourage preparers to choose accounting policies, which minimise the use of fair value or apply the provisions of IFRS 13 legalistically.

Research limitations/implications

Data are collected from a group of respondents from a single developing economy. Additional research on the application of IFRS 13 in other developing markets will be required to conclude on the relevance of economic, cultural and social factors for the understanding and implementation of new accounting standards by practitioners.

Practical implications

Standard setters and regulators cannot assume that new accounting standards will be interpreted and applied as intended. Even when compliance with IFRS is mandatory, preparers have considerable discretion when it comes to operationalising accounting prescriptions. Unless the challenges raised by preparers are addressed, misapplication of IFRS is likely to continue.

Originality/value

The research makes an important empirical and practical contribution by providing primary evidence on the operationalisation of IFRS 13 in a novel setting. It complements earlier research which has focused primarily on the conceptual/theoretical dimension and on American and European perspectives.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

R.P. Mohanty and Jerry C.C. Koay

Increases in industrialisation in developing countries bring bout increases in the levels of industrial waste which have to be disposed of. Increasing the efficiency of…

Abstract

Increases in industrialisation in developing countries bring bout increases in the levels of industrial waste which have to be disposed of. Increasing the efficiency of such waste disposal processes can be achieved by effective quality control systems. The objectives of waste control systems are multiple but can broadly be considered to be environmental and economic. This article shows how goal programming can be successfully applied to the type of quality control problem in which the levels of inputs and process variables are fixed in order to meet a required specification of output which is expressed by multiple characteristics. The authors conclude that the success of the approach depends crucially on the efficiency of the necessary regression analysis.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Michael J. Crean

Offers an analytical tool that measures reinvestment rate risk.Expands the knowledge of the concept of reinvestment vis‐...‐vis theinternal rate of return via the external…

Abstract

Offers an analytical tool that measures reinvestment rate risk. Expands the knowledge of the concept of reinvestment vis‐...‐vis the internal rate of return via the external rate of return. Concludes that investors should prefer investments that are less sensitive to reinvestment rate assumption than vice versa.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Tom Overmans

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the right type of organizational slack for innovation. It examines how city managers conceive slack, and how they create slack to…

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2008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the right type of organizational slack for innovation. It examines how city managers conceive slack, and how they create slack to facilitate innovation while dealing with fiscal stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is built around a comparative case study approach to uncover contrasts, similarities and patterns of slack-building for innovation in austere times. It relies on the experiences of 12 experienced city managers. Data are sought from elite interviews and one focus group.

Findings

The main finding is that innovation in the public sector does not benefit from slack in general, but from a specific type of slack. The evidence shows that useful slack for innovation is not so much about financial slack or HR slack, but about psychological slack.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the literature that the key questions of slack research should not only focus on identifying the “right amount” of slack but also on identifying of the “right type” of slack.

Practical implications

Public managers who want to deal with (fiscal) crises more innovatively might reconsider their perceptions of slack and its value. Rather than operating on a pure cost effectiveness paradigm, they should balance the costs of slack and its innovative abilities.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the social/psychological side of austerity management. It concludes that increasing the ability of public organizations to innovatively cope with fiscal stress is not so much about increasing predictive capacity or financial buffers, but about increasing the mental leeway of coworkers.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Jonathan Robin Crusoe and Karin Ahlin

This paper aims to develop a user process framework with activities and their variations for the use of open government data (OGD) based on empirical material and previous…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a user process framework with activities and their variations for the use of open government data (OGD) based on empirical material and previous research. OGD is interoperable data that is shared by public organisations (publishers) for anyone (users) to reuse without restrictions to create new digital products and services. The user process was roughly identified in previous research but lacks an in-depth description. This lack can hamper the ability to encourage the use and the development of related theories.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage research approach was used. First, a tentative framework was created from previous research and empirical material. This stage involved three different literature reviews, data mapping and seven interviews with OGD experts. The empirical material was analysed with inductive analysis, and previous research was integrated into the framework through concept mapping. Second, the tentative framework was reviewed by informed OGD experts. Third, the framework was finalised with additional literature reviews, eight interviews with OGD users, and a member check, including all the respondents. The framework was used to guide the data collection and as a tool in the analysis.

Findings

The user process framework covers activities and related variations, where the included phases are: start, identify, acquire, enrich and deploy. The start varies relating to the intended use of the OGD. In the identify phase, the user is exploring the accessible data to decide if the data are relevant. In the acquire phase, the user is preparing for the delivery of the data from the publisher and receiving it. In the enrich phase, the user is concocting and making something. In the final deploy phase, the user has a product or service that can be provided to end-users.

Research limitations/implications

The framework development has some limitations: the framework needs testing and development in different contexts and further verification. The implications are that the framework can help guide researchers towards relevant and essential data of the user process, be used as a point of comparison in analysis, and be used as a skeleton for more precious theories.

Practical implications

The framework has some practical implications for users, publishers and portals. It can introduce users to the user process and help them plan for the execution of it. The framework can help publishers understand how the users can work with their data and what can be expected of them. The framework can help portal owners to understand the portal’s role between users and publishers and what functionality and features they can provide to support to the user.

Originality/value

In previous research, no user process with an in-depth description was identified. However, several studies have given a rough recall. Thus, this research provides an in-depth description of the user process with its variations. The framework can support practice and leads to new research avenues.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

P. J. Hassall and S. Ganesh

This paper provides a further investigation into the application of Correspondence Analysis (CA) as outlined by Greenacre (1984, 1993), which is one technique for…

Abstract

This paper provides a further investigation into the application of Correspondence Analysis (CA) as outlined by Greenacre (1984, 1993), which is one technique for “quantifying qualitative data” in research on learning and teaching. It also builds on the utilisation of CA in the development of the emerging discipline of English as an International Language provided by Hassall and Ganesh (1996, 1999). This is accomplished by considering its application to the analysis of attitudinal data that positions the developing pedagogy of Teaching English as an International Language (TEIL) (see Hassall, 1996a & ff.) within the more established discipline of World Englishes (cf. Kachru, 1985, 1990). The multidimensional statistical technique Correspondence Analysis is used to provide an assessment of the interdependence of the rows and columns of a data matrix (primarily, a two-way contingency table). In this case, attitudinal data, produced at a number of international workshops which focused on the development of a justifiable pedagogy for Teaching English as an International Language (TEIL), are examined to provide a more complete picture of how these venues differed from each other with respect to the collective responses of the respondents. CA facilitates dimensionality reduction and provides graphical displays in low-dimensional spaces. In other words, it converts the rows and columns of a data matrix or contingency table into a series of points on a graph. The current study presents analyses of two different interpretations of this data.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Dilani Perera-Diltz and Jill Duba Sauerheber

Counselor educators graduating from accredited doctoral programs complete training in counseling, supervision, teaching, research, scholarship, leadership, and advocacy…

Abstract

Purpose

Counselor educators graduating from accredited doctoral programs complete training in counseling, supervision, teaching, research, scholarship, leadership, and advocacy. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the valued components of doctoral degree training in counselor education among new graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent graduates in full-time counselor education positions were surveyed using the Delphi method to determine which aspects of their doctoral training best prepared them for their current positions.

Findings

The participants valued or desired training in teaching, research, supervision, and potential mentorship.

Research limitations/implications

A serendipitous finding of the research was that mentorship, which was not a deliberate training feature, was highly valued by new counselor educators. Further research on which mentorship styles are best suited for counselor educator training is necessary. Continued training in teaching, research, and supervision is also necessary.

Practical implications

Some form of mentoring is desirable in counselor educator training programs to facilitate transition from year to year of doctoral study, as well as to assist transition from the role of student to faculty.

Originality/value

A desire to be mentored by faculty, specifically for students in counselor education doctoral programs, is revealed.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

Ian Fenwick and Peter Doyle

Introduction In recent years decision analysis has become an integral part of marketing and management courses. The benefits claimed for the technique are that it provides:

Abstract

Introduction In recent years decision analysis has become an integral part of marketing and management courses. The benefits claimed for the technique are that it provides:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

H. MYOKEN

This paper offers various state‐space representations in the context of applications of the system control theory to dynamic economic systems and examines…

Abstract

This paper offers various state‐space representations in the context of applications of the system control theory to dynamic economic systems and examines interrelationships between the alternative representations in both economics literature and system control engineering literature. In particular, some characteristics of various state‐space forms are assessed with respect to the structural properties of each form, thereby demonstrating the relative advantages and disadvantages of different realization methods presented in this paper.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Abstract

Details

Megaproject Risk Analysis and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-830-1

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