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1 – 10 of 330
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Hossein Derakhshanfar, J. Jorge Ochoa, Konstantinos Kirytopoulos, Wolfgang Mayer and Vivian W.Y. Tam

The purpose of this paper is to systematically develop a delay risk terminology and taxonomy. This research also explores two external and internal dimensions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically develop a delay risk terminology and taxonomy. This research also explores two external and internal dimensions of the taxonomy to determine how much the taxonomy as a whole or combinations of its elements are generalisable.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed methods research, this systematic literature review incorporated data from 46 articles to establish delay risk terminology and taxonomy. Qualitative data of the top 10 delay risks identified in each article were coded based on the grounded theory and constant comparative analysis using a three-stage coding approach. Word frequency analysis and cross-tabulation were used to develop the terminology and taxonomy. Association rules within the taxonomy were also explored to define risk paths and to unmask associations among the risks.

Findings

In total, 26 delay risks were identified and grouped into ten categories to form the risk breakdown structure. The universal delay risks and other delay risks that are more or less depending on the project location were determined. Also, it is realized that delays connected to equipment, sub-contractors and design drawings are highly connected to project planning, finance and owner slow decision making, respectively.

Originality/value

The established terminology and taxonomy may be used in manual or automated risk management systems as a baseline for delay risk identification, management and communication. In addition, the association rules assist the risk management process by enabling mitigation of a combination of risks together.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Miljenka Perovic, Vaughan Coffey, Stephen Kajewski and Ashok Madan

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the diverse issues that affect heritage projects during their lifecycle and in particular, why heritage-listed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the diverse issues that affect heritage projects during their lifecycle and in particular, why heritage-listed projects often fail to meet the delivery goals of time, budget, quality and scope.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was undertaken on a qualitative basis by conducting series of semi-structured interviews drawn from three case studies in SE Queensland. Qualitative research involves the evaluation of people’s experiences, feelings, social interactions, and the data gathered from this type of methodology is often varied and rich. A case study allows a researcher to test and generate theories based on real-world practice.

Findings

This paper presents the findings from a data collection exercise accomplished by conducting a series of qualitative case studies. Using a cross-case analysis approach, this paper highlights critical heritage project delivery issues and their causes.

Practical implications

The lessons learned from the study cases could be used in helping to prevent potential heritage project failures in the future.

Originality/value

The paper aims to bring greater awareness to practitioners and academics of the repeating issues that every heritage project is likely to face and offers some insight in how these may be mitigated.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Anuradha Pandya, Wayne van Zijl and Warren Maroun

The objective of this research is to explore the challenges being encountered when applying and implementing fair value accounting requirements, focusing specifically on…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to explore the challenges being encountered when applying and implementing fair value accounting requirements, focusing specifically on the determination of fair value per International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 13: Fair value measurement (IFRS 13) in the South African capital market.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 20 detailed interviews, primarily with preparers and interpretively analysed to identify how individuals internalise the requirements of IFRS 13 and the challenges associated with its application. The researchers focus specifically on South Africa because of its status as a developing economy and, at the same time, its extensive experience in applying IFRS.

Findings

South African preparers appear reluctant to change from a conventional cost-based measurement approach to one grounded in fair value. Primary concerns include the perceived usefulness of fair value accounting and its conceptual appropriateness, given its perceived de-emphasis of the traditional stewardship role of financial reporting. Related challenges to the application of IFRS 13 include concerns about the cost of determining fair value; the inherent subjectivity of fair value measures and the practical difficulty of calculating fair values when markets are not efficient or where business environments are complex and dynamic where Level 1 inputs are not widely available for all assets and liabilities. These challenges encourage preparers to choose accounting policies, which minimise the use of fair value or apply the provisions of IFRS 13 legalistically.

Research limitations/implications

Data are collected from a group of respondents from a single developing economy. Additional research on the application of IFRS 13 in other developing markets will be required to conclude on the relevance of economic, cultural and social factors for the understanding and implementation of new accounting standards by practitioners.

Practical implications

Standard setters and regulators cannot assume that new accounting standards will be interpreted and applied as intended. Even when compliance with IFRS is mandatory, preparers have considerable discretion when it comes to operationalising accounting prescriptions. Unless the challenges raised by preparers are addressed, misapplication of IFRS is likely to continue.

Originality/value

The research makes an important empirical and practical contribution by providing primary evidence on the operationalisation of IFRS 13 in a novel setting. It complements earlier research which has focused primarily on the conceptual/theoretical dimension and on American and European perspectives.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Mina Moeinedini, Sadigh Raissi and Kaveh Khalili-Damghani

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is assumed as a commonly used solution in order to provide an integrated view of core business processes, including product planning…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is assumed as a commonly used solution in order to provide an integrated view of core business processes, including product planning, manufacturing cost, delivery, marketing, sales, inventory management, shipping and payment. Selection and implementation of a suitable ERP solution are not assumed a trivial project because of the challenging nature of it, high costs, long-duration of installation and customization, as well as lack of successful benchmarking experiences. During the ERP projects, several risk factors threat the successful implementation of the project. These risk factors usually refer to different phases of the ERP projects including purchasing, pilot implementation, teaching, install, synchronizing, and movement from old systems toward new ones, initiation and utilization. These risk factors have dominant effects on each other. The purpose of this paper is to explore the hybrid reliability-based method is proposed to assess the risk factors of ERP solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this regard, the most important risk factors of ERP solutions are first determined. Then, the interactive relations of these factors are recognized using a graph based method, called interpretive structural modeling. The resultant network of relations between these factors initiates a new viewpoint toward the cause and effect relations among risk factors. Afterwards, a fuzzy fault tree analysis is proposed to calculate Failure Fuzzy Possibility (FFP) for the basic events of the fault tree leading to a quantitative evaluation of risk factors.

Findings

The whole proposed method is applied in a well-known Iranian foodservice distributor as a case study. The most impressive risk factors are identified, classified and prioritized. Moreover, the cause and effect diagram between the risk factors are identified. So, the ERP leader can plan a low-risk project and increase the chance of success.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ best knowledge, such approach was not reported before in the literature of ERP risk assessments.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Kris Rutten, Helena Calleeuw, Griet Roets and Angelo Van Gorp

In Flanders, the subventions in the cultural sector are mainly divided and decided upon within the framework of the Arts Decree. Within this policy framework, art…

Abstract

Purpose

In Flanders, the subventions in the cultural sector are mainly divided and decided upon within the framework of the Arts Decree. Within this policy framework, art organizations may choose in their funding applications for “participation” as one of the five possible functions to describe their artistic and cultural practices. However, questions need to be raised about the different interpretations of the notion of participation within this policy framework. The growing trend of evidence-based policy-making implies that participation risks to become a “target” that needs to be achieved instrumentally, which paradoxically ignores the fact that participatory practices within culture and the arts are very often diverse, multi-layered and context-specific practices. Starting from this paradox, the purpose of this paper is to explore how the current policy framework is translated into different “participatory” art practices by art organizations and specifically how cultural practitioners themselves conceptualize it.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a qualitative research based on semi-structured interviews with cultural practitioners about how they grapple with the notion of participation within their organizations and practices.

Findings

The results clearly show that practitioners use micro-politics of resistance to deal with different, and often conflicting, conceptualizations of participation in relation to this cultural policy framework.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the findings are vital for the discussion about cultural policy. These micro-politics of resistance do not only have an impact on the development of individual participatory art practices but also on the broader participatory arts landscape and on how the function of participation is perceived within the renewed policy framework.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is to explore the perspective of practitioners in cultural organizations about the function of participation in the Arts Decree in Flanders and specifically how the notion of participation is operationalized in their practices in relation to this cultural policy framework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Sachin Kumar Mangla, Sunil Luthra and Suresh Jakhar

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate green supply chain (GSC) managers and planners to model and access GSC risks and probable failures. This paper proposes to use…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate green supply chain (GSC) managers and planners to model and access GSC risks and probable failures. This paper proposes to use the fuzzy failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach for assessing the risks associated with GSC for benchmarking the performance in terms of effective GSC management adoption and sustainable production.

Design/methodology/approach

Initially, different failure modes are defined using FMEA analysis, and in order to decide the risk priority, the risk priority number (RPN) is determined. Such priority numbers are typically acquired from the judgment decisions of experts that could contain the element of vagueness and imperfection due to human biases, and it may lead to inaccuracy in the process of risk assessment in GSC. In this study, fuzzy logic is applied to conventional FMEA to overcome the issues in assigning RPNs. A plastic manufacturer GSC case exemplar of the proposed model is illustrated to present the authenticity of this method of risk assessment.

Findings

Results indicate that the failure modes, given as improper green operating procedure, i.e. process, operations, etc. (R6), and green issues while closing the loop of GSC (R14) hold the highest RPN and FRPN scores in classical as well as fuzzy FMEA analysis.

Originality/value

The present research work attempts to propose an evaluation framework for risk assessment in GSC. This paper explores both sustainable developments and risks related to efficient management of GSC initiatives in a plastic industry supply chain context. From a managerial perspective, suggestions are also provided with respect to each failure mode.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Development of the Maltese Insurance Industry: A Comprehensive Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-978-2

Abstract

Details

The Development of the Maltese Insurance Industry: A Comprehensive Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-978-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Mohammad Khalilzadeh, Peiman Ghasemi, Ahmadreza Afrasiabi and Hedieh Shakeri

The purpose of this study is to present a new failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach based on fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present a new failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach based on fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods and multi-objective programming model for risk assessment in the planning phase of the oil and gas construction projects (OGCP) in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This research contains multiple steps. First, 19 major potential health and safety executive (HSE) risks in OGCP were classified into six categories with the Delphi method. These factors were distinguished by the review of project documentation, checklist analysis and consulting with experts. Then, using the fuzzy SWARA method, the authors calculated the weights of major HSE risks. Subsequently, FMEA and PROMETHEE approaches were used to identify the priority of main risk factors. Eventually, a binary multi-objective linear programming approach was developed to select the risk response strategies, and an augmented e-constraint method (AECM) was used.

Findings

Regarding the project triple well-known constraints of time, cost and quality, which organizations usually confront, the HSE risks of OGCP were identified and prioritized. Also, the appropriate risk response strategies were also suggested to the managers to be adopted regarding the situations.

Originality/value

The present research points at the HSE risks’ assessment integrating the fuzzy FMEA, step-wise weight assessment ratio analysis and PROMETHEE techniques with the AECM. Further to the authors’ knowledge, the quantitative assessment of the HSE risks of OGCP has not been done using the combination of the fuzzy FMEA, MCDM and AECMs.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Hossein Derakhshanfar, J. Jorge Ochoa, Konstantinos Kirytopoulos, Wolfgang Mayer and Craig Langston

The purpose of this research is to identify the most impactful delay risks in Australian construction projects, including the associations amongst those risks as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify the most impactful delay risks in Australian construction projects, including the associations amongst those risks as well as the project phases in which they are most likely present. The correlation between project and organisational characteristics with the impact of delay risks was also studied.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from 118 delayed construction projects in Australia. Data were analysed to rank the most impactful delay risks, their correlation to project and organisational characteristics and project phases where those risks are likely to emerge. Association rule learning was used to capture associations between the delay risks.

Findings

The top five most impactful delay risks in Australia were changes by the owner, slow decisions by the owner, preparation and approval of design drawings, underestimation of project complexity and unrealistic duration imposed to the project, respectively. There is a set of delay risks that are mutually associated with project complexity. In addition, while delay risks associated with resources most likely arise in the execution phase, stakeholder and process-related risks are more smoothly distributed along all the project phases.

Originality/value

This research for the first time investigated the impact of delay risks, associations amongst them and project phases in which they are likely to happen in the Australian context. Also, this research for the first time sheds light on the project phases for the individual project delay risks which aids the project managers to understand where to focus on during each phase of the project.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

1 – 10 of 330