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Article

P. Andi Smart, Roger S. Maull, Abed Al-Fatah Karasneh, Zoe J. Radnor and Thomas J. Housel

Many organizations are embarking upon knowledge management initiatives to enhance their competitiveness. While there has been a significant amount of multidisciplinary…

Abstract

Many organizations are embarking upon knowledge management initiatives to enhance their competitiveness. While there has been a significant amount of multidisciplinary research in this area, the evidence from surveys of practitioners indicate that a large proportion of company projects focus on the implementation of technology‐based solutions without consideration of the structural and contextual issues. Many academic authors have presented a variety of different models for knowledge management but have often failed to relate these to the requirements of practitioners. This paper presents a model of knowledge management derived from a synthesis of current literature. The model emphasizes the need for knowledge evaluation within a knowledge management approach and describes, using a case study, how this might be achieved.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Frédéric Ponsignon, Phil Davies, Andi Smart and Roger Maull

The objective of this work is to empirically investigate the design of a service delivery system that supports the provision of modular service logistics offerings.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this work is to empirically investigate the design of a service delivery system that supports the provision of modular service logistics offerings.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth single-case study relying on interview data and extensive documentary evidence is carried out in the business-to-business (B2B) logistics sector. Three main analytical techniques are used to make sense of the qualitative data: thematic analysis, process mapping and the application of modular operators.

Findings

A modular service delivery system comprises three types of processes that collectively deliver modular offerings. The platform consists of core processes that enable the collection, transport and delivery of physical items for all offerings (modular and non-modular). Dedicated modular processes are mandatory and exclusive to individual modular offerings. Optional modular processes are shared across several modular offerings. Interfaces regulate physical (e.g. parcels or parts) and information (e.g. booking data) inputs provided by the customer in order to control the interdependencies within these different process types.

Practical implications

The identification of three process types and their interdependencies provides detailed insights into how managers can design modular logistics services that benefit from economies of scale and meet increasingly variable customer requirements. The importance of well-designed interfaces among the customers, the service offering and the service delivery system is highlighted.

Originality/value

This study extends previous modularity studies in service logistics. It is the first study to apply modular operators to determine the presence of modularity in the service delivery system and to establish the role of different process types in enabling modularity in the service delivery system.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article

R.S. Maull

The design of Quality Control (QC) systems is focused on, with particular attention to the integration of QC systems within Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM…

Abstract

The design of Quality Control (QC) systems is focused on, with particular attention to the integration of QC systems within Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) systems. A number of principles of good systems design are identified with each being detailed in turn and reference made to the application of these principles to the design of integrated QC systems at Du Pont. Some of the benefits and limitations of adopting such an approach are outlined.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

R.S. Maull, D.R. Tranfield and W. Maull

Addresses the implementation of business process re‐engineering (BPR) programmes in 33 public and private organisations wishing to improve performance. By reviewing the…

Abstract

Addresses the implementation of business process re‐engineering (BPR) programmes in 33 public and private organisations wishing to improve performance. By reviewing the existing literature, the research presented here began by identifying ten dimensions along which BPR projects might be measured. This research then uses these dimensions to investigate two research questions. Uses factor analysis based on quantitative data to address these questions. The factor analysis identified three independent aspects of BPR implementation: strategy, process and cost. These terms were then used in labelling three characteristic approaches, strategic BPR, process‐focused BPR and cost‐focused BPR. To investigate causality we re‐visited seven of the original organisations which had been in the early stages of implementation. Preliminary results indicate that managers might avoid the naturalistic tendency towards slow or stalled BPR maturity by intervening in a strategic sense at an earlier stage of implementation, thus bringing an organisation to a mature BPR programme more quickly.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Sarra Mamoghli, Luc Cassivi and Sylvie Trudel

The purpose of this paper is to assist organizations in the assessment of both information technology (IT) and human factors required to support their business processes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assist organizations in the assessment of both information technology (IT) and human factors required to support their business processes (BPs) by taking into account the interdependence and alignment of these factors, rather than considering them independently.

Design/methodology/approach

A design science research methodology was followed to build a maturity model (MM) enabling this assessment. The proposed design process is composed of four steps: problem identification, comparison of 19 existing MMs in business process management (BPM), iterative model development, and model evaluation. The last two steps were specifically based on three research methods: literature analysis, case studies, and expert panels.

Findings

This paper presents a MM that assigns a maturity level to an organization’s BPs in two assessment steps. The first step evaluates the level of sophistication and integration of the IT systems supporting each BP, while the second step assesses the alignment of human factors with the technological efforts.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted with SMEs, leading to results that may be specific to this type of organization.

Practical implications

Practitioners can use the proposed model throughout their journey toward process excellence. The application of this model leads to two main process improvement scenarios: upgrading the sophistication and integration of the software technologies in support of the processes, and improving the cohesion of the resources the organization already owns (human and IT resources).

Originality/value

The proposed MM constitutes a first step in the assessment of the interdependence between the factors influencing BPM.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Book part

Bart Kamp

This study explores whether machinery firms with a ‘hidden champions’ profile leverage Industry 4.0 practices to roll out smart services; whether this allows them to get a…

Abstract

This study explores whether machinery firms with a ‘hidden champions’ profile leverage Industry 4.0 practices to roll out smart services; whether this allows them to get a firm grip on their installed base; and whether it allows them to expand their international (service) business. The research is conducted based on exploratory, multiple-case study methods.

The author finds that the implementation of smart services can improve a machine tool builder’s hold on its installed base and expand the scope of its international (service) business. However, the study also finds that the ability to capitalise on this potential depends on a series of moderating variables. The study also concludes that there is a risk that smart services do not unlock a strong willingness-to-pay among potential customers.

It, therefore, calls into question several conventional wisdoms, such as the possibilities that Industry 4.0 offers for suppliers operating in business-to-business markets, and the receptiveness to smart services by buyers in such markets. Finally, it highlights the specific liabilities faced by hidden champions with regard to expanding their smart services business.

The chapter provides practical insights into the hurdles that industrial suppliers must overcome in their attempts to achieve uptake of smart services by customers, particularly within a cross-border context.

Details

International Business in the Information and Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-326-1

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Article

Gharib Hashem

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main organizational factors that contribute to the successful implementation of business process reengineering (BPR) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the main organizational factors that contribute to the successful implementation of business process reengineering (BPR) in the Egyptian banking sector. These factors include management commitment, information technology (IT) infrastructure, people management, change readiness, centralization and formalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The key organizational enablers were identified through an extensive literature review. Then, statistical analysis was carried out based on data collected, using a questionnaire instrument, from 184 managers employed in 38 banks operating in Egypt.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that management commitment, IT infrastructure, people management, change readiness and organizational structure with a low degree of formalization are critical enablers for implementing a successful BPR program within the Egyptian banking sector.

Practical implications

The results may support managers of banks in identifying and assessing the influence of integrating organizational factors that facilitate or hinder the successful implementation of BPR.

Originality/value

Since 2004, the Egyptian banking system has involved in major reform programs and many BPR efforts. Much research effort is required to investigate the BPR projects within the Egyptian banks in order to develop a concrete base of knowledge and understanding of the nature of BPR and factors that support its successful implementation. Moreover, there is an insufficiency of empirical studies regarding the implementation of BPR within the Egyptian service sector. The current study fills this gap by exploring and examining the main organizational factors affecting BPR implementation in a developing country.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Irene Ng, Glenn Parry, Laura Smith, Roger Maull and Gerard Briscoe

The purpose of this paper is to present a visualisation of the firm's offering from a service‐dominant logic (S‐DLogic) perspective. The case of Rolls‐Royce is presented…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a visualisation of the firm's offering from a service‐dominant logic (S‐DLogic) perspective. The case of Rolls‐Royce is presented as an avenue through which to explore an alternative view of the firm's value proposition, a visualisation informed by S‐DLogic that could aid organisations in their transition from goods‐dominant logic (G‐DLogic) to S‐DLogic.

Design/methodology/approach

Through integration of an operations management approach in process mapping and design and simulation with choice modelling in business‐to‐business marketing, this paper operationalises some of the key aspects of S‐DLogic, most notably focusing on the constructs of value and resources. This is explored through a single case; Rolls‐Royce which provides access to a rich source of internal and customer data.

Findings

The study finds that the S‐DLogic visualisation of the firm's value proposition in equipment‐based service consists of its contribution to 11 value‐creating activities towards value‐in‐use. The visualisation depicts both the highest possible bundle of benefits for the customer along with the resources and their costs associated with delivering those bundles. When brought together these enable the identification of the optimal bundle of value‐creating activities from both customer and firms' perspective.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence of the difference between a G‐DLogic and S‐DLogic view of the firm's value proposition. In doing so, extending existing literature on S‐DLogic by contributing to a methodological and empirical gap. Notably, it makes abstract concepts of S‐DLogic concrete, providing a pathway for future empirical work and begins the process of systematising a methodology in S‐DLogic.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article

R.R. Bales, R.S. Maull and Z. Radnor

This paper analyses the development of aerospace material supply chains. The paper begins with an overview of operations management literature, which introduces and…

Abstract

This paper analyses the development of aerospace material supply chains. The paper begins with an overview of operations management literature, which introduces and conceptualises the research area. Supply chain literature is examined, focusing on supply chain structure and the inter‐organisational links between supply chain actors. Analysis of case study material is presented to illustrate the scope, complexity and interdependent nature of the aerospace supply chain. Recurring themes from the literature are compared with the data categories emergent from the empirical case data. The results are discussed in terms of the changes that are taking place in supply chain structure to increase the overall effectiveness of the network. The paper concludes by identifying the need for, and discussing the nature of, a specialised organisation focused on managing the complex structure of the supply chain.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article

R.S. Maull, A.M. Weaver, S.J. Childe, P.A. Smar and J. Bennett

Presents the results of empirical research into issues faced by 25companies undertaking business process re‐engineering (BPR) programmes.The research team sought to…

Abstract

Presents the results of empirical research into issues faced by 25 companies undertaking business process re‐engineering (BPR) programmes. The research team sought to understand the BPR phenomenon through visits to 21 leading practitioners and four in‐depth case studies. The research indicated that six key issues affect the way in which BPR programmes are carried out, namely the nature of the change proposed (radical or incremental), the performance measures applied during the programme, the impact of information technology, the impact of human factors, the presence or absence of a process architecture and the link between BPR and strategy. The outcome of this research has implications for both practitioners and researchers. Where practitioners are concerned, the conventional, step‐by‐step BPR methodology should be amended to take into account these six issues more fully. For researchers there is a need for substantial research into good practice in BPR in each of the six areas.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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