Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Paul Iles

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and…

Abstract

I begin by examining some ways in which organisations have attempted to improve their recruitment and selection procedures to minimise bias and unfair discrimination, and focus on the assessment centre as a potentially useful technique in this respect, especially for managerial selection. I go on to examine the assessment centre in more detail, including its origins, construction and uses, before discussing the strong evidence for its validity as a selection and assessment procedure. I then describe some recent British innovations in assessment centre design and practice, especially in its use for management and organisation development purposes, before discussing some of my own recent research, in collaboration with Ivan Robertson and Usha Rout, on participants' attitudes towards the use of assessment centres for selection and development purposes, including gender differences in attitudes.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Virginia R. Boehm

Development applications of assessment centres represent an emerging and exciting area for human resources practitioners interested in maximising the benefits of such…

Abstract

Development applications of assessment centres represent an emerging and exciting area for human resources practitioners interested in maximising the benefits of such centres to their organisations and the people who work in them. Five applications are emerging: the use of assessment centre feedback, in itself, as a management development tool; early identification of high potential development programmes; use of centres for diagnosing strengths/weaknesses and devising individual training and development programmes; service as an assessor and as a developmental experience; and the centre as a tool for organisational planning/development.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1990

R.P. Bourgeois, T. Wils and L. Plouffe

Based on a sample of 65 workers having undergone majorreorientation of their careers, this study indicates that Driver′sspiral category is far from being a homogeneous…

Abstract

Based on a sample of 65 workers having undergone major reorientation of their careers, this study indicates that Driver′s spiral category is far from being a homogeneous one. Thus, individuals pursuing this type of career path can be broken down into three distinct subgroups both with respect to their interests as well as to their personality dynamics. The first subgroup contains the social‐artistic (e.g. author, housekeeper); the second, the conventional‐enterprising (e.g. accountant, banker); the third, the artistic‐investigative (e.g. psychologist, sculptor). All three sub‐types conform to Holland′s theory and are characterised by different personality variables.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1949

Mr. Fullman is well known to all Aslib members, as Information Officer at British Non‐Ferrous Metals Research Association. He has for years past given generously of his…

Abstract

Mr. Fullman is well known to all Aslib members, as Information Officer at British Non‐Ferrous Metals Research Association. He has for years past given generously of his time to Aslib as a very active member of its Council, its Publication Committee, its Conference Committee, and, during the last year particularly, as Chairman of its Education Committee and of the sub‐committees, he has been largely responsible for drafting the syllabus for the Training of the Information Officer, thereby making a signal contribution to our Association.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Filip Lievens

To diffuse new management fads or to promote existing management practices slogans are often used. In this study eight slogans regarding assessment centres were retrieved…

Abstract

To diffuse new management fads or to promote existing management practices slogans are often used. In this study eight slogans regarding assessment centres were retrieved from brochures of consultancy agencies and were compared to empirical research. These slogans were that assessment centres work, are expensive, fair, have a potent influence on candidates, provide insight into candidates’ personality, and are not prone to trainability effects. Other slogans include that trained assessors speak the same language and that candidate reactions are positive. Resulting from this comparison a more fine‐grained picture of the strengths and weaknesses of assessment centres emerges. In particular, it is demonstrated that the accuracy of the slogans often depends on design factors. It is suggested that future studies combine multiple research perspectives, examine assessment centre process issues, and validate new assessment centre applications.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Lynda Margaret Stansfield and Janine C. Day

The focus of research literature has concentrated mainly on the organisational perspectives of selection techniques, particularly on issues of utility. The participant…

Abstract

The focus of research literature has concentrated mainly on the organisational perspectives of selection techniques, particularly on issues of utility. The participant experience, in contrast, has relatively little representation. This study was designed to examine the subjective experience of assessment centre participants using a case‐study approach with the intention of identifying key factors which contribute to a positive orientation towards the organisation after the event. As well as examining the mechanics of assessment centres and highlighting examples of good and bad practice, the study highlights the range and strength of emotions experienced by the participants. Conclusions are drawn and practical recommendations are made on ways to improve the “candidate experience” without detracting from the original objectives of effective selection.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1988

Tibor R. Machan

Here Marx's philosophy is dissected from the angle of bourgeois capitalism which he, Marx, sought to overcome. His social, political and economic ideas are criticised…

Abstract

Here Marx's philosophy is dissected from the angle of bourgeois capitalism which he, Marx, sought to overcome. His social, political and economic ideas are criticised. Although it is noted that Marx wanted to ameliorate human suffering, the result turned out to be Utopian, contrary to his own intentions. Contrary to Marx, it is individualism that makes the best sense and capitalism that holds out the best hope for coping with most of the problems he sought to solve. Marx's philosophy is alluring but flawed at a very basic level, namely, where it denies the individuality of each person and treats humanity as “an organic body”. Capitalism, while by no means out to guarantee a perfect society, is the best setting for the realisation of the diverse but often equally noble human goals of its membership.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 15 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Tomas Riha

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and…

Abstract

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and, conversely, innovative thought structures and attitudes have almost always forced economic institutions and modes of behaviour to adjust. We learn from the history of economic doctrines how a particular theory emerged and whether, and in which environment, it could take root. We can see how a school evolves out of a common methodological perception and similar techniques of analysis, and how it has to establish itself. The interaction between unresolved problems on the one hand, and the search for better solutions or explanations on the other, leads to a change in paradigma and to the formation of new lines of reasoning. As long as the real world is subject to progress and change scientific search for explanation must out of necessity continue.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Abu F. Dowlah

Extensions/applications/revisions of the Marxian vision ofsocialism can broadly be categorized into two polar strands: thecentralized and the decentralized strands of…

Abstract

Extensions/applications/revisions of the Marxian vision of socialism can broadly be categorized into two polar strands: the centralized and the decentralized strands of socialist economic systems. Explores the main postulates of a decentralized version of a socialist economic system as provided by Kautsky, Luxembourg, Bernstein, Bukharin and Lange. The centralized strand of socialist economic systems has been elaborated drawing mainly from the writings of Lenin, Trotsky, Dobb, Sweezy and Baran.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

John E. Elliott and Abu F. Dowlah

This article investigates the intellectual roots of perestroika. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, the architect of perestroika claims that his programmes and policies are…

Abstract

This article investigates the intellectual roots of perestroika. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, the architect of perestroika claims that his programmes and policies are aimed at a revolutionary transformation of the Soviet economy from an overly centralised command system of management to a democratic system based mainly on economic methods and on an optimal combination of centralism and self‐management. To facilitate the restructuring process, Gorbachev simultaneously initiated two sweeping political reforms: glasnost (no “radical change is possible without it”); and demokratizatsiya (”there is no present‐day socialism, nor can there be, without democracy”). Therefore, prominent features envisaged by perestroika would presumably include: an optimal combination between centralism and self‐management, that would imply decentralisation in the economic management of the country; replacement of administrative methods by economic methods, that would emphasise economic incentives and market processes more than machineries of central planning; democratisation and openness in Soviet society, aimed at guaranteeing greater democratic rights for citizens, and pluralism in governmental and political processes.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000