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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

R.M.D. Eales‐White

This paper aims to enable the reader to understand: Herrmann's whole‐brained thinking model and its impact on language and difference; trends in development and the need

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enable the reader to understand: Herrmann's whole‐brained thinking model and its impact on language and difference; trends in development and the need for team‐based whole‐brained learning; why most culture change initiatives fail; what constitutes a core competence; and how a whole‐brained approach is required to ensure culture change, strategy development and the implementation of core competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The four thinking preferences are explained and examples provided of the use of different language for each of the four quadrants of the brain. The trends in development from left‐brained to right‐brained are set out and an example provided of how whole‐brained learning is most effective. Five generic reasons for the failure of culture change initiatives are set out. The core competence of the corporation is explained as well as how it was vital to success that each quadrant of the brain, i.e. the whole brain, is applied in an integrated way to achieve effective implementation.

Findings

There is a direct link between organisational profitability and culture. A whole‐brained approach to the implementation of strategy, culture change and people development is required.

Originality/value

Develops an understanding of the nature of our thinking preferences and how to apply an integrated whole‐brained approach to the successful development and implementation of strategy, culture change and core competences, thereby gaining a long‐term sustainable competitive edge in the market‐place.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

The paper looks at organizations who spend significant sums of money sending top people on training programs, only to find they are reluctant to put what they have learned…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper looks at organizations who spend significant sums of money sending top people on training programs, only to find they are reluctant to put what they have learned into practice when they get back to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews an article which explains “whole‐brained” thinking and the need for team‐based “whole‐brained” learning.

Findings

The paper finds that differences among people showing A, B, C or D‐brained tendencies make it essential that there is a whole‐brained approach to strategy development and culture change.

Original/value

As regards learning, not only should it be whole‐brained but also team‐based, as building effective teams is the only way to create value out of difference, given that difference, when looked at purely from an individual perspective, tends to create negative attitudes and emotions

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Rupert Eales‐White

The paper seeks to demonstrate in detail precisely how any city law firm can transform its profitability. Part 1 considers relevant concepts – change preference, paradigms

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to demonstrate in detail precisely how any city law firm can transform its profitability. Part 1 considers relevant concepts – change preference, paradigms and different approaches to creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The four change preferences are defined, and the impact of difference on language and approach to leadership is considerd. The profiles of partners in a city law firm are examined. The organisational paradigm or recipe for success is defined, and the impact of implicit beliefs or blind spots is considered. The paper seeks to provide the reader with an understanding of cognitive thinking styles – adaptive and innovative, and connect to the “cautious control” and “positive creative” change management preferences.

Findings

Partners, on average, have a left‐brain bias and prefer to have a logically detached approach to change, rather than a focus on people issues. Decision takers have an innovative approach to change management. City law firms would best manage change by setting out a long‐term strategic intent, with a series of corporate challenges, implemented sequentially and connected to the past.

Originality/value

The paper will enable the reader to understand key relevant concepts and learn how law firms can most effectively manage change.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

R.M.D. Eales‐White

Examines why so many companies are implementing fundamental changesin the way they do business, and how a gap between actual and desiredoutcomes is occurring. Postulates…

Abstract

Examines why so many companies are implementing fundamental changes in the way they do business, and how a gap between actual and desired outcomes is occurring. Postulates that lack of effective behavioural change is a key reason for the gap, and develops a model for behaviour. Considers how the existing behavioural base within a company can be established, and what direction for change is indicated by environmental forces. Concludes by considering strategy for change, and the key issues which need to be addressed.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Rupert Eales‐White

The purpose of part 3 of this paper is to demonstrate what are the individual's preferences in change management, where they are naturally located on both the creative

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of part 3 of this paper is to demonstrate what are the individual's preferences in change management, where they are naturally located on both the creative thinking and change management continua, how they can improve their creative thinking skills and how organisations can improve profitability be adopting the appropriate change management paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper determines how the Practical or Concept preference for gathering and using information impacts on how we think creatively; summarises Dr Kirton's work on adaptive and innovative thinking; demonstrates how the two models are linked and where different preferences are located on the creative thinking and change management continua; considers how individuals with different profiles approach change management in an organisational context; introduces the change preference model and consider the implications on effective change management; considers how to overcome the limitations of individuals profiles on their ability to think creatively; and finally defines the prevailing change management paradigm and how a modification to the definition of change and the resulting paradigm will enable organisations to improve their management of change and, as a result, profitability.

Findings

The paper finds that individuals have more flexibility and ability in creative thinking and change management than they might currently perceive; whereas organisations can improve their management of change significantly be adopting the appropriate change management paradigm and using a whole‐brained or holistic approach.

Originality/value

The paper enables the reader to determine what their current approach to creative thinking and change management is, and how they and organisations can become more effective.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Rupert Eales‐White

The purpose of parts I and II is to demonstrate in detail precisely how any city law firm can transform its profitability. Part II examines the business model, the “us”

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of parts I and II is to demonstrate in detail precisely how any city law firm can transform its profitability. Part II examines the business model, the “us” and “them” divide, alternative careers for lawyers, change management and culture change.

Design/methodology/approach

Sets out how the left‐brain business model limits the ability to transform profitability, pushes firms towards becoming a low cost producer and denies the ability to gain a competitive advantage; also sets out a range of strategies to reduce the “us” and “them” divide that currently exists; emphasises the need to provide a range of alternative careers for lawyers rather than continue with an “up” or “out” approach; demonstrates the dominance of the innovative change management paradigm, the negative consequences on effective change management and what could be a successful balanced change management paradigm; considers the importance of culture, why culture change initiatives fail and the damage caused by the lack of any explicit change management paradigm, and what could be a successful explicit paradigm that would transform profitability.

Findings

The left‐brain business model denies the ability to transform profitability or to gain a competitive edge in the marketplace. Profitability and motivation of graduates joining law firms would increase if a range of alternative careers was provided. Developing and implementing a balanced change management paradigm would radically improve change management and profitability. Creating a cultural competitive edge through implementing an explicit, team‐based cultural paradigm and focusing development on the core development competences of delegation and co‐ordination would transform profitability.

Originality/value

The value of part II is in enabling the reader to understand the complete range of strategies to transform city law firm profitability.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Rupert Eales‐White

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate to the reader that those organisations, which develop a complete explicit organisational paradigm and the strategy to implement

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate to the reader that those organisations, which develop a complete explicit organisational paradigm and the strategy to implement it, will guarantee themselves a competitive edge in both short and long‐term profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines a paradigm and provides an example of a “prevailing paradigm” or “recipe of success”. It provides the reader with understanding of cognitive thinking styles – adaptive and innovative. The paper considers the adaptive and innovate change management paradigms, the advantages and disadvantages, and suggests an effective explicit change management paradigm. It looks at the importance of culture, why culture change initiatives fail and suggests an effective explicit culture paradigmThe paper sets out a process that will enable any organisation to harness the power of paradigms and hence deliver a competitive edge in profitability.

Findings

If an organisation ensures that its core decision makers collectively develop explicit paradigms in all key business areas, it achieves strategic focus and increases its profitability at a faster rate than its competitors.

Originality/value

Develops an understanding of the nature and power of paradigms and how to harness that power to achieve a competitive edge in profitability.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Mark Ritter, Amrik S. Sohal and Brian D’Netto

Past research on manufacturing has not generally included research on the attributes of outstanding manufacturing managers. This information is important as the success of…

Abstract

Past research on manufacturing has not generally included research on the attributes of outstanding manufacturing managers. This information is important as the success of the manufacturing function depends to an extent on the quality of the manager. This study sought then to identify the attributes of an outstanding manufacturing manager. The methodology adopted included reviewing relevant literature, analysing job advertisements and surveying senior manufacturing managers. The profile of the outstanding manufacturing manager that emerged contained 12 specific attributes. These were classified into three groups i.e. attributes related to the position; attributes related to people management; and attributes related to the individual manager. The profile identified in this study is quite different from the traditional profile of an old‐fashioned autocrat who has risen from the ranks. Today’s manufacturing manager requires a strong academic background to understand and implement leading manufacturing and management techniques, good interpersonal skills and high levels of energy and drive.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Rupert and Eales‐White

Examines the role of leadership at managerial and senior executivelevel. Analyses research findings to show that managers want morevisionary team‐based leadership from…

Abstract

Examines the role of leadership at managerial and senior executive level. Analyses research findings to show that managers want more visionary team‐based leadership from their chief executive officers, but there is a significant gap at present. Considers the historic leadership style and role model “command and control”, how senior executives still operate in variations of this role‐model, while middle to senior managers have become much more supportive as their own experience, role‐model and training has altered. Looks at how changes in the external business environment suggest that a more empathetic, visionary style of leadership is required. Concludes by highlighting how the senior executives of today need to recognize the need for and undertake training in visionary, team leadership to enable their managers to be more effective leaders in the future.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Deseré Kokt

In a culturally diverse environment, such as that found in South Africa it is imperative that one understands the dynamic elements that make us all different. As these…

Abstract

In a culturally diverse environment, such as that found in South Africa it is imperative that one understands the dynamic elements that make us all different. As these differences influence the way individuals behave, it will influence their interaction in the workplace. The aim of this article is to reflect on the diversity issues as captured in a study conducted on operational level work teams in the security industry. One should expect to find substantial diversity problems where individuals, who traditionally do not have a history of mixing, are now working together to achieve organizational goals.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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