Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1929

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil…

Abstract

THE PRESIDENT of the Library Association for 1929–30 will be Lord Balneil, the son of the Earl of Crawford, and it is difficult to think of a better choice. Lord Balneil has an admirable bibliographical ancestry—if we may so put it—seeing that his grandfather, the 26th Earl of Crawford, was President in 1898; and the Haigh Hall Library at the family seat is one of the noble private libraries of England. Lord Balneil is the Chairman of the Appeal Committee for the endowment of the School of Librarianship and so has already identified himself in a practical manner with the cause of libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Robert M. Blackburn

Looks at the historical positioning of housework as unpaid and questions the correctness of this idea. States that there is a fundamental theoretical error in defining…

Abstract

Looks at the historical positioning of housework as unpaid and questions the correctness of this idea. States that there is a fundamental theoretical error in defining housework as unpaid as market concepts are being applied to non‐market work. Continues to distinguish between the two markets considering the features of both, outlining the gender differences and the recent changes in the twentieth century.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1940

THIS issue opens the new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD and it is natural that we should pause to glance at the long road we have travelled. For over forty years our pages…

Abstract

THIS issue opens the new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD and it is natural that we should pause to glance at the long road we have travelled. For over forty years our pages have been open to the most progressive and practical facts, theories and methods of librarianship; our contributors have included almost every librarian who has held an important office; and we have always welcomed the work of younger, untried men who seemed to have promise— many of whom have indeed fulfilled it. In the strain and stress of the First World War we maintained interest and forwarded the revisions in library methods which adapted them to the after‐war order. Today we have similar, even severer, problems before us, and we hope to repeat the service we were then able to give. In this we trust that librarians, who have always regarded THE LIBRARY WORLD with affection, will continue to support us and be not tempted because of temporary stringency, to make a victim of a journal which has given so long and so independent a service.

Details

New Library World, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1928

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so…

Abstract

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so, rising from the greater value placed upon the recreations of the people in recent decades. It has the name of the pleasure city of the north, a huge caravansary into which the large industrial cities empty themselves at the holiday seasons. But Blackpool is more than that; it is a town with a vibrating local life of its own; it has its intellectual side even if the casual visitor does not always see it as readily as he does the attractions of the front. A week can be spent profitably there even by the mere intellectualist.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Ruth Braunstein

A growing interdisciplinary literature explores how people can simultaneously hold strong convictions and remain open to the possibility of learning from others with whom…

Abstract

A growing interdisciplinary literature explores how people can simultaneously hold strong convictions and remain open to the possibility of learning from others with whom they disagree. This tension impacts not only knowledge development but also public discourse within a diverse and disagreeing democracy. This volume of Political Power and Social Theory considers the specific question of how religious convictions inform how people engage in democratic life, particularly across deep political divides. In this introduction, I begin by discussing how a narrow vision of religious citizens as dogmatic believers has led observers to frame religion as a concerning source of democratic distortion – encouraging too much arrogance and not enough humility. Yet this dogmatic believer narrative captures only one aspect of American religion. Juxtaposing a snapshot of dogmatic believers alongside two other snapshots of religious groups engaging in political life raises complex questions about the relationship between religious conviction, humility, and democracy in a time of deep political polarization. I argue that answering these questions requires a sociological approach that is attuned to power, context, culture, institutions, and history. At the same time, I show how attention to the tension between conviction and humility has the potential to enrich the sociological study of religion and democracy, and particularly ethnographic research across the moral/political divide.

Details

Religion, Humility, and Democracy in a Divided America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-949-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1953

P.R. Payne

Based fundamentally on the ‘Energy Method’ approach to helicopter performance calculation, a method is presented for calculating performance of a design in the project…

Abstract

Based fundamentally on the ‘Energy Method’ approach to helicopter performance calculation, a method is presented for calculating performance of a design in the project stage. In another form, less suitable for project work, the equations have been used for performance estimation by the writer for several years. They were found to give better agreement with flight test and rotor tower results than any other method tried. It is believed that the method gives quicker and more accurate results for project work than any so far developed.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Alan Poulter

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on an editorial from an earlier issue, entitled “The librarian and the art of reading”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on an editorial from an earlier issue, entitled “The librarian and the art of reading”.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical review of the argument presented in the original editorial.

Findings

The concept of the “art of reading” (essentially critical thinking about text) proposed in the original editorial has held up well, especially when its historical context (World War Two) is appreciated.

Practical implications

This article would be of interest to anyone working in libraries who is interested in the promotion of reading and why we read.

Originality/value

Analyses a challenging concept – the “art of reading” (essentially critical thinking about text).

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1941

STAFF problems in libraries are likely to become very severe within the next few months. That “best seller” among publications, the official schedule of reserved…

Abstract

STAFF problems in libraries are likely to become very severe within the next few months. That “best seller” among publications, the official schedule of reserved occupations, permits no reservation of librarians over the age of 35 after the middle of July, 1941. The effect of this will be that many libraries will be left almost entirely without male staffs. A number of libraries come to mind immediately where the chief librarian himself is under 35, and it is very unlikely that he will have assistants older than himself. It is true that we have never seen an emergency so severe, and perhaps there is nothing that can be done about it. It has been suggested in one quarter that librarians of neighbouring districts should undertake the supervision of any library which is to be deprived of its chief. We are quite sure that such work would gladly be undertaken in spite of the difficulties which the older librarians will experience and are already experiencing seeing that many of them are involved in Food or Civil Defence services. Each librarian must consider very carefully how his system may be preserved and be made to function during his absence: it will require much ingenuity not to lose ground. On the other hand, the use of libraries by the public, even in blitzed areas, is still so great that they are obviously an integral part of the life of our people.

Details

New Library World, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1944

R.H. BLACKBURN

Librarians are, on the whole, dangerously modest concerning the actual and potential influence their work exercises on society. I say “dangerously modest,” because in…

Abstract

Librarians are, on the whole, dangerously modest concerning the actual and potential influence their work exercises on society. I say “dangerously modest,” because in these days it is certainly not wise to ignore the great influence which libraries, as centres of learning, can have on a community. It is something which is likely to increase greatly during the next generation if the new educational plans are brought to full maturity. If these statements are accepted as facts, then it is necessary to try and assess the librarian's responsibilities in the scheme of things now and as it might be in the future, and perhaps also attempt to define his sphere of influence.

Details

Library Review, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

R.H. Blackburn

Written in 1944, the purpose of this paper is to assess the librarian's increasing responsibilities and influences in the light of new educational plans.

Abstract

Purpose

Written in 1944, the purpose of this paper is to assess the librarian's increasing responsibilities and influences in the light of new educational plans.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a personal viewpoint on the subject of “the librarian and the art of reading”.

Findings

It is vital that librarians should stress more and more the creative art of reading and point to the dangers of both superficial reading and of over‐indulgence.

Originality/value

The paper emphasises the great influence that libraries, as centres of learning, can have on a community.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000