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DANIEL HAY

When we are young a year is a long time, and ten years an eternity. It is only at a later stage when someone we have loved and admired for many years accepts well‐earned…

Abstract

When we are young a year is a long time, and ten years an eternity. It is only at a later stage when someone we have loved and admired for many years accepts well‐earned retirement that we realize how quickly the years slip away.

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Library Review, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

MURIEL WEIR

“With a host of furious fancies, whereof I am commander …” Thus might R. D. Macleod announce himself in the office, charging the atmosphere with vitality. To be…

Abstract

“With a host of furious fancies, whereof I am commander …” Thus might R. D. Macleod announce himself in the office, charging the atmosphere with vitality. To be middle‐aged was very Heaven. The hardships and struggles of youth were behind him: the terrors and trials and loneliness of old age as yet unknown. But all was not sweetness and light. He had the true Celtic temperament,—up in the heights, down in the depths,—and on other mornings he might come in heavy with depression, and the atmosphere be laden with his ill‐humour. The office was that of a library department of W. & R. Holmes, to whom R. D. was consulting librarian.

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Library Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

R.D. Macleod

R. D. MACLEOD'S career can be summarized briefly. Born in Greenock, he joined the staff of the public library there in 1902. He moved to Glasgow and was a district…

Abstract

R. D. MACLEOD'S career can be summarized briefly. Born in Greenock, he joined the staff of the public library there in 1902. He moved to Glasgow and was a district librarian in Hutchesontown and Anderston before his appointment in 1915 as librarian to the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust, with responsibility for their pioneer North of Scotland scheme. In 1921 he joined Messrs W. & R. Holmes, booksellers in Glasgow, as consulting librarian, and he retired from the firm as a director in December 1963. One of the first to bring the professional skill of the librarian into the world of bookselling, to the end he considered himself a librarian.

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Library Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

J.D. Hendry

Addresses the challenge for the library and information profession ‐ in embracing the emerging global information society and the need to manage the changes that come with…

Abstract

Addresses the challenge for the library and information profession ‐ in embracing the emerging global information society and the need to manage the changes that come with this. Considers the historical background of public funded libraries of all kinds and the public service ethos which has sustained them over many generations. This ethos is now being challenged in turn by the concept of information as a marketable commodity rather than a right of citizenship. Notes that the forces of the private sector and the market economy are driving the new concept of information as such a marketable commodity, and that there is a clash of values between the earlier traditions which were led by the public sector, and the current situation, driven by the private sector. The conclusion summarises the significance of both a traditional, book‐based culture and that of information and communications technologies and draws a comparison between these and the two cultures of C.P. Snow’s paper of 1959 (The Rede Lecture).

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Library Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Stuart James

The purpose of this paper is to indicates the history and nature of Library Review over 80 years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to indicates the history and nature of Library Review over 80 years.

Design/methodology/approach

A chronological narrative highlights the main themes and personalities involved in the history of the journal.

Findings

Library Review has changed in nature and outlook since its foundation although many of its professional fundamentals remain unchanged.

Practical implications

Discusses the history of one of the longest running library journals and as such should be of practical interest to library historians and those interested in journal publishing.

Originality/value

Celebrates the 80th anniversary of Library Review, written by a former editor, the second‐longest‐serving incumbent at the journal.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

THIS issue forms the conclusion of Volume LX of THE LIBRARY WORLD, and from the editorial point of view we regard the last issue as the final stage in the completion of an…

Abstract

THIS issue forms the conclusion of Volume LX of THE LIBRARY WORLD, and from the editorial point of view we regard the last issue as the final stage in the completion of an entirely separate undertaking—in much the same way that we regard December 31st as completing an independent calendar episode—for in one moment a whole present period of time suddenly becomes a part of the past; and we incline to review this (no longer current) volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD in brief fashion, and to mention the considerable changes which it has witnessed, not only in its own make‐up, but also in the make‐up of the library world.

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New Library World, vol. 60 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

BY February most of the parties, which are a gracious feature of modern libraries, are over. They arise from Staff Guilds, which now in most libraries associate the…

Abstract

BY February most of the parties, which are a gracious feature of modern libraries, are over. They arise from Staff Guilds, which now in most libraries associate the workers, and some of them are on a large scale. We have been represented at only a few of these but there seems to be a great fund of friendliness upon which the modern librarian can draw nowadays. An interesting one was that of the National Central Library Staff which, by a neighbourly arrangement, was held at Chaucer House. A reunion has been held of old and new members of the Croydon Staff Guild and no doubt there were many others. One New Year party was a small but notable dinner at Charing Cross Hotel where the 100th issue of The Library Review was toasted eloquently by the President of the Library Association and amongst the guests were Mr. C. O. G. Douie who was secretary of the Kenyon Committee of the 1927 Library Report and well‐known librarians and journalists. To us it was notable for the assertion by Mr. R. D. Macleod that amongst the young writers were too many who wrote glibly but without that research which good professional writing demanded; but he was sure that where intelligent industry was shown any article resulting would find a place in library journals.

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 18
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

NEIL M. BRUCE

In 1979 the trustees of the R. D. MacLeod Trust divided their monies between the two Scottish library schools to further the studies in libraries and librarianship carried…

Abstract

In 1979 the trustees of the R. D. MacLeod Trust divided their monies between the two Scottish library schools to further the studies in libraries and librarianship carried on in them. The first research grant awarded by the School of Librarianship, Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology, Aberdeen from the above fund enabled the writer to study rural mobile services in Scotland both in detail and in perspective.

Details

Library Review, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Tom Kinninmont

PERIODICAL LITERATURE is notoriously afflicted by a high infant mortality rate. Literary magazines in particular seem to exhibit all the survival instincts of a…

Abstract

PERIODICAL LITERATURE is notoriously afflicted by a high infant mortality rate. Literary magazines in particular seem to exhibit all the survival instincts of a claustrophobic lemming. It is therefore a special pleasure to see an avowedly ‘bookish’ magazine—and a Scottish one at that—celebrate its fiftieth birthday. Fifty years of a Scottish literary periodical! It is rather like running up a cricket score at football. Even more extraordinary is the fact that these fifty years have been achieved under only two editors. R. D. Macleod, the founding editor, ran the magazine for 37 years, while his successor, W. R. Aitken, has been in charge for, as he puts it, ‘a mere 13’.

Details

Library Review, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

IN recognition of his services to the library movement in India, H. H. the Maharaja Gaekwar of Baroda, G.C.S.I., was the guest of honour at a dinner given at Claridge's…

Abstract

IN recognition of his services to the library movement in India, H. H. the Maharaja Gaekwar of Baroda, G.C.S.I., was the guest of honour at a dinner given at Claridge's, London, on 30th May, by the transitive circle called THE LIBRARY REVIEW AND FRIENDS. Those present included Mr. E. Salter Davies, C.B.E., President of the Library Association, Mr. L. R. McColvin, F.L.A., Hon. Secretary of the Library Association, Mr. P. S. J. Welsford, F.I.S.A., Secretary of the Library Association, Mr. W. C. Berwick Sayers, F.L.A., Chief Librarian, Croydon Public Libraries, Mr. J. H. Roberts of the New Statesman and Nation, Dr. Modak, the A.D.C. to H. H. the Maharaja Gaekwar, Mr. Newton M. Dutt, F.L.A., formerly Reader to His Highness and State Librarian of Baroda, and Mr. R. D. Macleod, F.L.A. (who presided). Apologies for absence were received from Colonel J. M. Mitchell, C.B.E., Professor C. N. Seddon, sometime Dewan of Baroda, Mr. S. K. Ratcliffe, Mr. M. H. Spielmann, F.S.A., Mr. William Will, Captain L. Cranmer‐Byng, and one on behalf of Mr. Arundell Esdaile, Secretary to the British Museum, who was at Madrid.

Details

Library Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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