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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1946

R.D. Cullum

BEFORE dealing with the specific problems which confronted the Repair Organization of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, the general system which was adopted by the Company…

Abstract

BEFORE dealing with the specific problems which confronted the Repair Organization of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, the general system which was adopted by the Company may be outlined.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1946

R.D. Cullum

TWO items which frequently appeared on the repair lists for the Beaufort and Beaufighter, were (i) the main inter‐spar ribs to which the fuselage is attached, and (ii) the…

Abstract

TWO items which frequently appeared on the repair lists for the Beaufort and Beaufighter, were (i) the main inter‐spar ribs to which the fuselage is attached, and (ii) the ribs carrying the nacelle structure (FIG. 26). The attachment ribs for the fuselage were usually known as the box ribs, a term derived from their form of construction which consisted of inner and outer alclad webs with top booms of extruded angfe section and built‐up bottom booms of box section forming the link between the longerons of the front and rear fuselages. On the Beaufighter the ribs were attached to the spars by means of extruded angles, extruded channels being employed on the Beaufort (FIG. 27). The ribs were further stiffened by inter‐web members of channel section. Each attachment rib for the nacelle structure consisted of an alclad web with a top and bottom boom of extruded angle section and secured to a bracing of square section steel tubes.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1946

R.D. Cullum

HOWEVER good the result, every designer expects, and receives, criticism—mostly adverse. But even the most adverse destructive criticism can be of some value to a designer…

Abstract

HOWEVER good the result, every designer expects, and receives, criticism—mostly adverse. But even the most adverse destructive criticism can be of some value to a designer whose interest is the furtherment and betterment of his work and who does not take criticism as a personal reflection on his ability.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1947

Roy Chad wick

THE policy and organization of the Avro Repair Group was based upon intelligent anticipation—anticipation of the many and varied types of damage that might be expectedl…

Abstract

THE policy and organization of the Avro Repair Group was based upon intelligent anticipation—anticipation of the many and varied types of damage that might be expectedl anticipation of quantities, and anticipation of facilities to deal with all contingencies. The central depot at Bracebridge Heath, Lincoln, developed from an ex‐1914–18 war hangar to an establishment employing nearly 3,000 men and forming the hub of an organization that embraced many stations and subcontractors' works, civilian out‐working parties, of A. V. Roe personnel, effected a high proportion of major repairs to Lancaster, York and Anson aircraft; such parties were stationed all over the British Isles and were supplemented by a fleet of some seventy mobile workshops.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2017

Basil P. Tucker and Matthew Leach

Purpose: The current study aims to cast light on the divide between academic research in management accounting and its applicability to practice by examining, from the…

Abstract

Purpose: The current study aims to cast light on the divide between academic research in management accounting and its applicability to practice by examining, from the standpoint of nursing, how this gap is perceived and what challenges may be involved in bridging it.

Design/Methodology/Approach: The current study compares the findings of Tucker and Parker (2014) with both quantitative as well as qualitative evidence from an international sample of nursing academics.

Findings: The findings of this study point to the differing tradition and historical development in framing and addressing the research–practice gap between management accounting and nursing contexts and the rationale for practice engagement as instrumental in explaining disciplinary differences in addressing the research–practice gap.

Research Implications Despite disciplinary differences, we suggest that a closer engagement of academic research in management accounting with practice “can work,” “will work,” and “is worth it.” Central to a closer relationship with practice, however, is the need for management accounting academics to follow their nursing counterparts and understand the incentives that exist in undertaking research of relevance.

Originality/value: The current study is one of the few that has sought to look to the experience of other disciplines in bridging the gap. Moreover, to our knowledge, it is the first study in management accounting to attempt this comparison. In so doing, our findings provide a platform for further considering how management accounting researchers, and management accounting as a discipline might, in the spirit of this study’s title, “Learn from the Experience of Others.”

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-297-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

1023

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1899

Numbers of worthy people are no doubt nursing themselves in the fond and foolish belief that when the Food Bill has received the Royal assent, and becomes law, the…

Abstract

Numbers of worthy people are no doubt nursing themselves in the fond and foolish belief that when the Food Bill has received the Royal assent, and becomes law, the manufacture and sale of adulterated and sophisticated products will, to all intents and purposes, be suppressed, and that the Public Analyst and the Inspector will be able to report the existence of almost universal purity and virtue. This optimistic feeling will not be shared by the traders and manufacturers who have suffered from the effects of unfair and dishonest competition, nor by those whose knowledge and experience of the existing law enables them to gauge the probable value of the new one with some approach to accuracy. The measure has satisfied nobody, and can satisfy nobody but those whose nefarious practices it is intended to check, and who can fully appreciate the value, to them, of patchwork and superficial legislation. We have repeatedly pointed out that repressive legislation, however stringent and however well applied, can never give the public that which the public, in theory, should receive—namely, complete protection and adequate guarantee,—nor to the honest trader the full support and encouragement to which he is entitled. But, in spite of the defects and ineffectualities necessarily attaching to legislation of this nature, a strong Government could without much difficulty have produced a far more effective, and therefore more valuable law than that which, after so long an incubation, is to be added to the statute‐book.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1933

HARROGATE will be notable as the venue of the Conference in one or two ways that distinctive. The Association Year is now to begin on January 1st and not in September as…

Abstract

HARROGATE will be notable as the venue of the Conference in one or two ways that distinctive. The Association Year is now to begin on January 1st and not in September as heretofore; and, in consequence, there will be no election of president or of new council until the end of the year. The Association's annual election is to take place in November, and the advantages of this arrangement must be apparent to everyone who considers the matter. Until now the nominations have been sent out at a time when members have been scattered to all parts of the country on holiday, and committees of the Council have been elected often without the full consideration that could be given in the more suitable winter time. In the circumstances, at Harrogate the Chair will still be occupied by Sir Henry Miers, who has won from all librarians and those interested in libraries a fuller measure of admiration, if that were possible, than he possessed before he undertook the presidency. There will be no presidential address in the ordinary sense, although Sir Henry Miers will make a speech in the nature of an address from the Chair at one of the meetings. What is usually understood by the presidential address will be an inaugural address which it is hoped will be given by Lord Irwin. The new arrangement must bring about a new state of affairs in regard to the inaugural addresses. We take it that in future there will be what will be called a presidential address at the Annual Meeting nine months after the President takes office. He will certainly then be in the position to review the facts of his year with some knowledge of events; he may chronicle as well as prophesy.

Details

New Library World, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1956

F.H. Hooke and P.S. Langford

Fatigue of aircraft structures has become a major subject for research in the past ten years and the importance of establishing safe lifetimes for operation of aircraft or…

Abstract

Fatigue of aircraft structures has become a major subject for research in the past ten years and the importance of establishing safe lifetimes for operation of aircraft or for replaceable structural components is now recognized. Some major contributions have been made to the knowledge of this subject, including methods of life assessment, determination of the fatigue resistance of several types of complete aircraft wing structure by laboratory test and some more fundamental studies of fatigue. The fatigue problem is considerably better understood than it was ten years ago and it can now be said with certainty where the most serious gaps lie. Information on two of these topics—namely, scatter, and the effect of random loading sequences—is being sought in the research programmes now proceeding at the Aeronautical Research Laboratories. Because of the vastness of the field a plea is made for greater inter‐change of information on the results of fatigue tests in all countries.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library…

Abstract

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties. Anything that Mr. Jast has to say is said with originality even if the subject is not original; his quality has always been to give an independent and novel twist to almost everything he touches. We think our readers will find this to be so when he touches the important question of “The Library and Leisure.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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