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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

R.B. Lambert and A. Simon

This paper presents an integrated regulatory model to protect depositors in the event of a retail financial institution run or failure. In Australia, many of the factors…

Abstract

This paper presents an integrated regulatory model to protect depositors in the event of a retail financial institution run or failure. In Australia, many of the factors included in this model are either not in existence, or if in existence have not been fully implemented. A review of regulatory arrangements for retail financial institutions in Australia is warranted in the light of these deficiencies.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Catherine McGlynn and Shaun McDaid

Abstract

Details

Radicalisation and Counter-Radicalisation in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-005-5

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Chien-Yuan Hou

The purpose of this paper is to complete fatigue analysis of welded joints considering both the crack initiation sites and crack coalescence, and to generate virtual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complete fatigue analysis of welded joints considering both the crack initiation sites and crack coalescence, and to generate virtual welded specimens for computer simulation of fatigue life on a specimen-by-specimen basis; knowledge regarding the weld toe stress concentration factor (SCF) sequence is essential. In this study, attempts were made to analyze the sequence and to find a simple method to generate the sequence using computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Laser scanning technique was used to acquire the real three-dimensional weld toe geometry of welded specimens. The scanned geometry was digitally sectioned, and three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the scanned specimens were constructed and the weld toe SCF sequence was calculated. The numbers in the sequence were analyzed using a simple autoregression model and the statistical properties of the sequence were acquired.

Findings

The autoregression analysis showed the value of a weld toe SCF is linearly related to its neighboring factor with a high correlation. When a factor value at a toe location is known, the neighboring factor can be simulated by a simple linear equation with a random residual. The weld toe factor sequence can thus be formed by repeatedly using the linear equation with a residual. The generated sequence exhibits close statistical properties to those of the real sequence obtained from FE results.

Practical implications

When the weld toe SCF sequence is known, it is possible to foresee potential crack locations and the subsequent crack coalescence. The results of the current study will be the foundation for the future work on fatigue analysis of welded joints considering the effects of crack initiation site and crack coalescence.

Originality/value

The weld toe SCF sequence was rarely discussed previously because of a lack of the available data. The current study is the first work to investigate the statistical properties of the sequence and found that a simple autoregression equation can be used to perform the analysis. This study is also the first work that successfully generates a weld toe SCF sequence, which can be used to simulate virtual welded specimens.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Ury M. Gluskinos and Micha Popper

The implications of disabilities, whether already existing at thetime of appointment or incurred during the working career, are examinedat the macro‐organisational levels…

Abstract

The implications of disabilities, whether already existing at the time of appointment or incurred during the working career, are examined at the macro‐organisational levels – productivity and human resources strategy. It is argued that the extent of physical disability of an individual may be quite independent of his/her contribution to the organisation. Consequently, a diagnostic model was developed which assesses an individual’s Total Productivity Capacity (TPC). The TPC index proposed is a multiplicative function of a disabled worker’s Productivity Potential (PP) at work, assessed by the direct supervisor, and individual Sickness Absence (SA) rate compared with the organisation’s average (SA\sb\(x)): TPC = [1 ‐ (SA\sb\(n) – SA\sb\(x))] x PP. A 2 x 2 matrix, measuring extent of physical handicap and TPC allows grouping of handicapped into four categories: mildly handicapped with low TPC scores, mildly handicapped with high TPC scores; highly handicapped with high TPC scores; highly handicapped with low TPC scores. The utility of this classification scheme is demonstrated through an exploratory study conducted at a production plant for military vehicles where 12 per cent (n= 310) of the workforce were medically defined as disabled. TPC indices were derived for each disabled employee, and for the different plants/shops. Comparison of average TPC scores with incidence of disabilities indicated the independence of these measures, partially validating the proposed diagnostic model. Implications for production planning and differential personnel policies appropriate for disabled employees within the categorisations suggested are elaborated upon.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Teodiano Freire Bastos, L. Calderón, J.M. Martín and R. Ceres

Evaluates the applicability of ultrasonic sensors in a welding environment and reports on experimental measurements carried out with a sensory head containing ultrasonic…

Abstract

Evaluates the applicability of ultrasonic sensors in a welding environment and reports on experimental measurements carried out with a sensory head containing ultrasonic transducers with different frequencies. Analyses the effects on the sensors of factors such as noise, temperature and shielding gas flow and concludes by suggesting appropriate protective measures for the sensors for them to operate effectively in a welding environment.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

David A. Reid, Richard E. Plank, Robert M. Peterson and Gregory A. Rich

The purpose of this paper is to understand what sales management practices (SMPs) are being used by managers in the current market place, changes over time, insights that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what sales management practices (SMPs) are being used by managers in the current market place, changes over time, insights that can be gained and future research needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this paper were collected via a cross-sectional internet-based survey using a sampling frame provided by a professional sales publication. ANOVA was used to analyze 159 sales manager respondents.

Findings

Empirical results indicate that several differences are evident across the 68 SMPs items gathered, especially in terms of the size of the sales force and establish some data on using technology in sales management. However, in spite of significant changes in the sales environment, many SMPs have had limited change.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this paper include a sample frame drawn from a single source and via the internet and, thus, may have excluded some possible respondents from participation and somewhat limit generalizability.

Practical implications

The results of this paper raise a number of important issues for sales managers to consider. First, which SMPs should they be using? Managers need to give serious thought as to which practices they choose to use. Second, why are so many of them not making more extensive use of sales force technology? Third, is it wise for sales managers to be relying on executive opinion as their most extensively used forecasting method or should they be emphasizing another approach? A fourth issue is the continued heavy emphasis on generating sales volume as opposed to profits.

Originality/value

The data provide a rare and updated understanding of the use of SMPs by sales managers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Imran Awan

Al‐Qaeda poses a major challenge to western democracies with its international networks and suicide attacks; it has been involved in some of the most horrific terrorist…

Abstract

Purpose

Al‐Qaeda poses a major challenge to western democracies with its international networks and suicide attacks; it has been involved in some of the most horrific terrorist attacks across the world. As a result the UK, similar to many other countries, has enacted hard‐line counter‐terrorism legislation that has had an impact upon Muslim community relations with law enforcement agencies. This paper aims to examine the glorification offence under the Terrorism Act and its implications for free speech.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed to examine counter‐terrorism legislation in Britain and in particular the offence of glorification and the impact it has had upon Muslim communities using empirical case studies and theoretical evidence.

Findings

It is found that Muslim communities feel that their freedom of speech, thought and expression have been seriously curtailed as a result of the glorification offence and has led them to feel a sense of alienation and stigma which has manifested itself in the community by not trusting law enforcement agencies and counter‐terrorism policies.

Practical implications

In order to build trust with the Muslim community law enforcement agencies such as the police need to ensure that they do not disproportionately use their power of arrest under the guise of combating terrorism. Therefore, there is a need for law enforcement agencies to improve their internal and external structures through a process of engagement and understanding Muslim communities which would help rebuild trust and confidence.

Originality/value

The paper examines counter‐terrorism legislation and provides a theoretical framework for how policy should be shaped in the area of counter‐terrorism. Currently the literature available concerning the new government reforms and the glorification offence under the Terrorism Act is limited and thus this paper provides a unique contribution towards understanding this offence in more detail and the impact it may have upon Muslim communities and civil liberties.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Imran Awan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current UK Prevent Agenda 2011 and the possible threat to local communities from such policies which may actually fuel further…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current UK Prevent Agenda 2011 and the possible threat to local communities from such policies which may actually fuel further resentment and make communities less safe and more susceptible to radicalisation and extremism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a short qualitative study that involved members of the Alum Rock community in Birmingham (UK) that had experience of Prevent strategies. The study involved semi‐structured interviews which were conducted with Muslim community members who were involved either directly or indirectly with Prevent programmes in the area of Alum Rock.

Findings

The study found that overall Muslim communities within Alum Rock were suspicious of the role of law enforcement agencies and counter‐terrorism policies such as Prevent.

Research limitations/implications

In a short qualitative study and with a small sample size there is clearly a need to do further research and deal with a larger sample size that would demonstrate a more representative view of the community.

Practical implications

This study can help inform and improve the counter‐terrorism policy framework which includes Prevent. For example, more emphasis is needed on getting views from Muslim communities through focus groups and interviews which could in turn help build trust between Muslim communities and law enforcement agencies.

Originality/value

There is currently little research on the Prevent Agenda 2011 and the present paper provides an important contribution in understanding the views of Muslim communities in an area which has been the subject of a number of high profile counter‐terrorism operations (for example, Operation Gamble involved a number of police raids aimed at foiling a plot to behead a Muslim soldier), Project Champion (where West Midlands police used overt and covert surveillance (CCTV) cameras in predominantly Muslim areas). The data collected could be used as a template for gaining a better understanding of how Muslims feel about Prevent and as such can improve relations between Muslim communities and the police.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Rolando Quintana

An analysis of the US border manufacturing industry revealed that, while a plentiful supply of inexpensive labor is available, there are high levels of absenteeism and…

Abstract

An analysis of the US border manufacturing industry revealed that, while a plentiful supply of inexpensive labor is available, there are high levels of absenteeism and turnover. This in turn has affected this industry’s ability to implement lean and agile manufacturing production environments. It was argued that lower inventory levels and quicker response time to market fluctuations are required for these manufacturers to stay competitive. Yet, without careful consideration of the idiosyncrasies of the infrastructure, the change to leaner and more agile manufacturing could destroy some of these plants. The high levels of absenteeism and turnover, which have a direct bearing on the low and variable product yield rates, could cause an agile and lean production system to fail. Yet this research has shown that a recursive, pull‐type production control system that will meet the required daily quota and minimize inventory while accounting for high levels of absenteeism and turnover that directly affect workstation yield rates would be advantageous. That is, a US border manufacturer can become leaner and more agile in spite of the drawbacks that are germane to the US border manufacturing industry.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2002

Clevo Wilson

In this chapter the contingent valuation method is used to estimate the yearly value to an average farmer in Sri Lanka of avoiding direct exposure to pesticides and the…

Abstract

In this chapter the contingent valuation method is used to estimate the yearly value to an average farmer in Sri Lanka of avoiding direct exposure to pesticides and the resulting illnesses. The costs are shown to be high. The pesticide cost scenarios calculated from the contingent valuation bids for the entire country show that the costs run into millions of Sri Lankan rupees each year. The last section of the paper identifies the factors that influence the willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid direct exposure to pesticides and the resulting illnesses. The health policy implications stemming from the regression analysis are also discussed.

Details

Economics of Pesticides, Sustainable Food Production, and Organic Food Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-850-7

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