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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1992

R.A. Proctor

Suggests a novel approach to generating marketing strategies andevaluating them. Identifies that the process often involves severalpeople and that the different people may…

Abstract

Suggests a novel approach to generating marketing strategies and evaluating them. Identifies that the process often involves several people and that the different people may have different viewpoints. The approach is based on a computer‐assisted structured approach to identifying possible strategies and the use of the computer to enable decision makers to evaluate the strategic ideas generated.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Philip J. Kitchen and R. Anthony Proctor

The response or non‐response of small businesses to change is an important area of study. Environmental analysis is a crucial corollary to business development and growth…

Abstract

The response or non‐response of small businesses to change is an important area of study. Environmental analysis is a crucial corollary to business development and growth. However, experience of small firms has indicated that the managers of such enterprises may become myopic in relation to changes in the business environment, or may not respond to or notice slow change. This myopia or lethargy exhibited by small firms needs to be avoided if such firms are to survive and grow. Four crucial questions (where is the firm now; where is it heading if it takes no action to change things; where do we want the firm to be; and how might we take it there?) must be answered if small firms wish to survive and grow. It is recommended that environmental analysis coupled with the use of a creativity consultant may help small firms to develop strategies for adjusting to change and avoiding marketing myopia.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

R.A. Proctor

Development in micro‐computer software packages is examined as theyimpinge on the area of creative problem solving in business. It isargued that skills in creative problem…

Abstract

Development in micro‐computer software packages is examined as they impinge on the area of creative problem solving in business. It is argued that skills in creative problem solving can do much to further organisational efficiency and effectiveness and that interactive computer systems have an important role to play. A review is provided of different computer aids to creative problem solving and an overview is given of the different approaches to management games. Many of the different kinds of management game are amenable to computerisation.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

R.A. Proctor

Argues the case for formalized creativity decision support systems.Technology, both in terms of hardware and software, now supports thepossibility of a decision support…

Abstract

Argues the case for formalized creativity decision support systems. Technology, both in terms of hardware and software, now supports the possibility of a decision support system which can benefit from creative problem‐solving mechanisms. Given the need for creative thinking in business and the availability of technology for this purpose, it is not surprising to find considerable progress being made in this area.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

R.A. Proctor

Discusses the phenomena of strategic windows and entrapment.Develops Abell′s (1983) notion of strategic windows in arguing thatwhere an enterprise has overlapping…

Abstract

Discusses the phenomena of strategic windows and entrapment. Develops Abell′s (1983) notion of strategic windows in arguing that where an enterprise has overlapping strategic windows it can shift its attention to a different window when one window starts to close. This makes it easier for the firm to stay in business. Moreover, strategic windows which have closed can be reopened (viz. the watch industry and the rebirth of clockwork movements in the 1990s). Strategic windows present opportunities for decision makers but they also contain traps. Combines for the first time the concepts of strategic windows and entrapment.

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Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Tony Proctor

We live in a world that is undergoing continuous and rapid change. Situations are regularly encountered that have not previously arisen. Technology, competition, changes…

Abstract

We live in a world that is undergoing continuous and rapid change. Situations are regularly encountered that have not previously arisen. Technology, competition, changes in social values, new expectations of customers, economic upheaval and all the other kinds of changes that can occur in the business environment produce new problems for management. Often solutions to such problems requires insight that traditional, well used problem solving techniques are unable to provide. Under such circumstances the need for creative problem solving assumes a greater importance than ever before. Developments in world markets, shorter production cycles, the requirement to find new ways to resource the exploitation of opportunities, and the scarcity and cost of basic resources are just a few of the new challenges to the modern day executive. In order to respond to such challenges there is a need to think creatively.

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Management Research News, vol. 16 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

R.A. Proctor and P.J. Kitchen

In any type of business it is almost inevitable that some productsor services will be more financially attractive to market than others.Ways are introduced in which…

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Abstract

In any type of business it is almost inevitable that some products or services will be more financially attractive to market than others. Ways are introduced in which strategic business units can evaluate the kinds of products and services they are offering. The suggestion is made that it may be in the interests of some units to drop certain kinds of products or services because they are unable to be operated profitably. Other products or services, however, may benefit from investment. Various product portfolio models exist which help in the task of classifying products or services. The various approaches are discussed, and how to develop the GEC‐McKinsey type of model with the aid of a spreadsheet is shown.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

R.A. Proctor

Not only is the computer and its associated software a powerful research tool but it has been argued also that the utilisation of Information Technology makes an important…

Abstract

Not only is the computer and its associated software a powerful research tool but it has been argued also that the utilisation of Information Technology makes an important contribution to competitive advantage (e.g., Keen 1986; Remenyi 1988; Earl 1989). In particular it is important to note the impact, in this respect, of end‐user computing — the capability of users to have direct, hands on control over their computing needs — the rapid growth of which has been fuelled by the advent of personal computers and fourth generation languages (Gerrity and Rockart 1986; Alavi, Nelson and Weiss 1988). End user computing presents three kinds of competitive benefit to the individual, group or organisation: efficiency benefits, effectiveness benefits; and transformation benefits (Arkush and Stanton 1988; Porter and Gogan 1988).

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Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

R. A. Proctor

One of the fastest growing areas of microcomputerapplications is that of expert systems. Within thedomain of expert systems neural networkingtechnology is also making a

Abstract

One of the fastest growing areas of microcomputer applications is that of expert systems. Within the domain of expert systems neural networking technology is also making a strong contribution. Personnel officers have to give advice to management and this is usually based on a good deal of experience. Expert systems represent a way of passing on this knowledge to less experienced colleagues so that they too can make suitable decisions if the more experienced staff are not available. Sometimes expert systems can surprise the experts who provided information to help build the systems. This article looks at a neural networking shell that can be trained to emulate an expert system. Its simplicity of operation and user friendliness is a striking feature.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Tony Proctor and Paul Ruocco

Suggests a structured approach to decision making in the context ofgenerating appropriate marketing strategies. The method includes the useof a creative problem‐solving…

Abstract

Suggests a structured approach to decision making in the context of generating appropriate marketing strategies. The method includes the use of a creative problem‐solving method, brainstorming. Decisions often involve several people and different people may have different viewpoints on the suitability of various strategies which can be pursued. The approach facilitates the sharing of different viewpoints and the bringing together of disparate ideas in the formulation of specific marketing strategies. The approach employs a structured approach to identifying possible strategies using a combination of the “TOWS matrix” and brainstorming. The method has applicability to other areas, where strategy is being formulated.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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