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Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

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Article

R. WEATHERALL

A NOVEL and interesting method of lubrication has been developed by Menrow Pumps Limited of Essex Street, London, W.C.2.

Abstract

A NOVEL and interesting method of lubrication has been developed by Menrow Pumps Limited of Essex Street, London, W.C.2.

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Book part

Maria Grafström and Anna Jonsson

In this chapter, we explore genre-blurring writing, where fiction meets theory, following the argument that texts in management and organisation studies suffer from the…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore genre-blurring writing, where fiction meets theory, following the argument that texts in management and organisation studies suffer from the ‘textbook syndrome’. The stories that we tell through textbooks not only influence, but also set boundaries for, the way understandings are developed through the eyes of the reader. Often textbooks are written in a way that lead the reader into an idealised linear understanding of an organisation – far from the problems, dilemmas and messy everyday life that managers experience. Our discussion builds on previous literature on writing differently and our own experiences of writing a textbook by involving a professional novelist. Engaging in genre-blurring writing opens up how we think not only about writing, fiction and facts but also in our role as scientists. By situating ourselves, as researchers, at the intersection of fiction and the scientific work, not only new ways of writing, but also of thinking emerge. We discuss three aspects through which fiction challenge and develop our writing and thinking, namely to write with voice, resonance and an open end. Through genre-blurring writing, we create opportunities both to learn and to engage students in learning.

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Writing Differently
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-337-6

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Article

IT is very appropriate that this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD should be devoted to the subject of cataloguing. This has become current in a special degree owing to the…

Abstract

IT is very appropriate that this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD should be devoted to the subject of cataloguing. This has become current in a special degree owing to the activity of the A.L.A. and the L.A. committees on both sides of the Atlantic, who are engaged in reviewing the Anglo‐American Code of Cataloguing Rules. Cataloguing is a subject that figures more in the minds of candidates for examinations than it does in the average conversations of librarians, but there is no more important subject in the librarian's life and no more significant activity. Our readers may not accept the implications of the somewhat vigorous “Letters on Our Affairs” which appear in this number, but it could be urged that there are many things to consider in cataloguing which have immediate importance. The matter was a simple one in former days. Forty years ago every library in this country of any size found it possible to issue a printed catalogue of some sort or other. The objections to these printed catalogues are commonplace to‐day; they were expensive, their cost was not recovered by sales, and they were incomplete from the beginning. The point is that libraries somehow managed to publish them, and those libraries were, as our correspondent suggests, of as good service to literature in its best sense as are present libraries.

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New Library World, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

OUR readers need no apology from us for the attention given to Library Training in these pages. The amount of dissatisfaction with the present state of affairs, if it may…

Abstract

OUR readers need no apology from us for the attention given to Library Training in these pages. The amount of dissatisfaction with the present state of affairs, if it may be judged from the gossip and letters that reach us, is of some proportions. It is not to be supposed that complaints are necessarily justified. They may be made in the natural chagrin of disappointment by candidates who have failed. Alternatively, there may be reasons which have a disinterested origin. The record of passes and failures shows that in December there was a dêbacle in candidates in the subject of cataloguing, which at least merits thought. In earlier issues it has been suggested by our writers that examinations twice yearly encourage experiments in sitting. There has also been the suggestion that librarians place too much stress on qualifications for their juniors and urge them to struggle with subjects for which they cannot be ready. To pass in cataloguing a student must be able to catalogue anything from a novel to an academic thesis in Anglo‐Norman French on Phlogiston, supposing that to be possible!

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New Library World, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Carolyn Wiley

Changes in the capabilities and composition of the Americanworkforce which will occur within the next ten years will create some ofthe most encompassing challenges ever…

Abstract

Changes in the capabilities and composition of the American workforce which will occur within the next ten years will create some of the most encompassing challenges ever faced by the United States. The main challenge for companies is to rethink and restructure their recruiting activities in order to attract competent employees vis‐à‐vis decreasing educational credentials and dramatic demographic changes in the workforce entrants. Such a challenge broadens the scope of recruiting and requires multifaceted recruitment strategies. Aims to reveal how nontraditional (corporate involvement in public education) and improved traditional recruiting strategies can enable businesses to continue to attract and retain capable employees from different genders, marital statuses and ethnic backgrounds. Strategies which proved effective in the past will continue to work in the future as long as companies are willing to adapt their messages and their workplaces to meet the needs and demands of this changing workforce.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Michael Dennis

Suicide is a tragic cause of death and causes considerable distress for families, carers and healthcare professionals. Thankfully, suicide rates in older people in the UK…

Abstract

Suicide is a tragic cause of death and causes considerable distress for families, carers and healthcare professionals. Thankfully, suicide rates in older people in the UK have steadily declined for both men and women since the mid‐1980s. An understanding of the clinical and demographic characteristics of both completed suicide and non‐fatal self‐harm in older people is important in informing the development of preventative strategies to sustain this decline. Non‐fatal self‐harm in older people is relatively uncommon compared with younger age groups, but research indicates that self‐harm among older people is frequently a failed attempt at suicide. Thus, the important factors associated with self‐harm in this age group are similar to those linked with completed suicide, particularly high rates of clinical depression, poor physical health and social isolation. Unfortunately, there is also a high rate of subsequent completed suicide. For this reason, self‐harm in later life needs to be taken very seriously and a careful assessment of risk and need by a specialist in older people's mental health should be conducted. The identification and appropriate management of older people with depression in the community and general hospitals is a key area for the prevention of self‐harm and suicide in this age group and requires further attention, particularly with targeted support programmes for those at high risk.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part

Melissa Pearrow and Peter Whelley

Public schools possess a unique constellation of opportunities and challenges for mental health service provision. Schools, as settings within a larger ecological context…

Abstract

Public schools possess a unique constellation of opportunities and challenges for mental health service provision. Schools, as settings within a larger ecological context, can be a community institution that supports a child as s/he develops assets for resilient development while providing opportunities for a range of life choices. School is the setting where children can learn and practice peer relations and social norms, and it can be a refuge where children who have many environmental risks can find structure and effective methods of success (Doll, 1999). When Willie Horton, the infamous bank robber, was asked why he robbed banks, he responded, “Because that's where the money is.” At a most basic level, schools are where the children are. Every day more than 52 million students attend over 1,14,000 schools in the United States, and including the 6 million adult staff, this amounts to almost one-fifth of the population passing through the Nation's schools on any given weekday (New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003).

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Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

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Article

Lakshmi Balachandran Nair

Many management scholars view templates as rigid rulebooks suffocating qualitative research. This viewpoint article recommends that, instead, templates should be viewed…

Abstract

Purpose

Many management scholars view templates as rigid rulebooks suffocating qualitative research. This viewpoint article recommends that, instead, templates should be viewed through the lens of organizational routines.

Design/methodology/approach

To facilitate this viewpoint, this article first clarifies the confusions surrounding templates. It points out that how using templates, like following routines in an organization, constitutes three parts - the artifact, the ostensive and the performative; the latter two being often neglected by template critics. The use of templates is encouraged by discussing the learning advantages for novice researchers, through an autoethnographic note narrating the author’s own research and teaching experiences.

Findings

This article deliberates upon the criticisms against templates. It then discusses templates using a perspective offered by organizational routines. Thereafter, the use of templates in qualitative management research is discussed, with the help of examples from published reports. Finally, the article explains a way of reflexively using templates through an autoethnographic note detailing the author’s own research and teaching experiences.

Originality/value

In its entirety, the article submits that the artifacts offered by the templates and the ostensive and performative engagements of the template-users must co-exist for co-creating excellent qualitative research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Content available
Article

Kristin S. Williams

Ficto-feminism is offered here as a creative method for feminist historical inquiry in management and organizational studies (MOSs).

Abstract

Purpose

Ficto-feminism is offered here as a creative method for feminist historical inquiry in management and organizational studies (MOSs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces a new method called ficto-feminism. Using feminist polemics as a starting point, ficto-feminism fuses aspects of collective biography with the emic potential of autoethnography and rhizomatic capacity of fictocriticism to advance not only a new account of history in subject but also in style of writing.

Findings

The aim of ficto-feminism is to create a plausible, powerful and persuasive account of an overlooked female figure which not only challenges convention but also surfaces her lost lessons and accomplishments to benefit today's development of theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

The paper reviews the methodological components of ficto-feminism and speaks to the merit of writing differently and incorporating fictional techniques.

Originality/value

To illustrate the method in action, the paper features a non-fiction, fictitious conversation with Hallie Flanagan (1890–1969) and investigates her role as national director of the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) (1935–1939). The FTP was part of the most elaborate relief programs ever conceived as part of the New Deal (a series of public works projects and financial reforms enacted in the 1930s in the USA).

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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