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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

R. Vittal Rao and M. Yaseen

Organic Coatings are used for protection of metallic structures from corrosion. However they fail to isolate the substrate from corrosive materials present in the…

Abstract

Organic Coatings are used for protection of metallic structures from corrosion. However they fail to isolate the substrate from corrosive materials present in the surroundings because the amount of water absorbed in coatings facilitates the movement of corrosive ions and gases through them, which in turn corrode the metal. The present studies illustrate the relative degree of permeation of chloride ions and water vapour through a variety of alkyd coating formulations.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Organic Coatings are used for protection of metallic structures from corrosion. However they fail to isolate the substrate from corrosive materials present in the…

Abstract

Organic Coatings are used for protection of metallic structures from corrosion. However they fail to isolate the substrate from corrosive materials present in the surroundings because the amount of water absorbed in coatings facilitates the movement of corrosive ions and gases through them, which in turn corrode the metal. The present studies illustrate the relative degree of permeation of chloride ions and water vapour through a variety of alkyd coating formulations.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

B.V. Kumar

In about 1990, India and a few developing countries attempted to restructure their economics to achieve accelerated economic growth, for generation of optimum levels of…

Abstract

In about 1990, India and a few developing countries attempted to restructure their economics to achieve accelerated economic growth, for generation of optimum levels of production, employment and poverty alleviation. The economic and fiscal policies took a turn towards liberalisation, deregulation, de‐control and de‐licensing, so that the economy opens up and unnecessary legal and bureaucratic impediments are removed to reduce delays and costs. During the last five years, industrial, trade and tax reforms have created demonstrable buoyancy in industrial production, investment and exports.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2014

Stuart Locke and Geeta Duppati

This paper empirically examines the impact of corporate governance reforms on the financial performance of Indian state-owned enterprises (SOEs) for the period 2003–2011.

Abstract

Research question

This paper empirically examines the impact of corporate governance reforms on the financial performance of Indian state-owned enterprises (SOEs) for the period 2003–2011.

Research findings/insights

The findings indicate that the various corporate governance reforms collectively exhibited a statistically significant positive impact on performance when a difference in difference estimation process is used. However, the performance of SOEs is less than that of publicly listed companies, which is consistent with prior research. When the SOEs are compared with a matched pairing of publicly listed companies of similar size and same industry, their performance was comparable and in many instances superior. This is indicative of the regulatory constraints on competitors and preferential access to resources and markets given to the SOEs. As SOEs move towards a more mixed ownership model with more of them listed on the stock exchange and greater public ownership of shares the corporate governance issues will increase in importance.

Theoretical/academic implications

The controlled sell down of shares in SOEs presents a need for continuing governance reforms and ongoing research to track progress.

Practitioner/policy implications

The most striking observation from the study is that changes that were introduced as a corporate governance reform, such greater professionalism in boards, did not gain traction and enhance performance, rather the process of director selection and the concentrated bureaucratic and political interference stymied what was asserted to be conceptually sound reforms.

Details

Mechanisms, Roles and Consequences of Governance: Emerging Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-706-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Krishna K. Tummala

One cannot mandate honesty.– Veerappa Moily, Chair,Second Administrative Reforms Commission, 2007India did not invent corruption, but it seems to excel in it. Transparency…

Abstract

One cannot mandate honesty.– Veerappa Moily, Chair,Second Administrative Reforms Commission, 2007India did not invent corruption, but it seems to excel in it. Transparency International, (TI) in its September 2007 Corruption Perception Index, placed India 72nd (tying with China and Brazil) with its neighbors Sri Lanka at 94th, Pakistan 138th, and Bangladesh 162nd as among the most corrupt of the 180 nations it surveyed. Denmark, Finland, and New Zealand stood at the top as the least corrupt, while Mynamar and Somalia are ranked at the bottom as the most corrupt. In 2008, India was ranked at 74th (Transparency International, 2007, 2008). In its 2005 study, TI found that as many as 62% of Indians believe corruption is real and in fact had first hand experience of paying bribes (Transparency International, 2005). Three-fourths in the survey also believe that the level of corruption in public services has only increased during 2004–2005. It is estimated that a total of about $5 billion are paid annually as bribes. The police are ranked as the most corrupt, followed by lower judiciary and Land Administration. Yet Suresh Pachauri, the Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs, Government of India, declared: “Government is fully committed to implement its policy of zero tolerance against corruption. It is moving progressively to eradicate corruption by improving transparency and accountability” (Pachauri, 2008). This is a rather sorry state for a country known as the largest working democracy.

Details

The Many Faces of Public Management Reform in the Asia-Pacific Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-640-3

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Abstract

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

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Case study
Publication date: 26 June 2018

Neeraj Pandey and Anish Kumar

Marketing, Pricing, Strategic marketing.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, Pricing, Strategic marketing.

Study level/applicability

The case is developed for an MBA-level program.

Case overview

In May 2017, the telecom industry in India witnessed an intense price war over 4G (fourth generation) data prices. Gopal Vittal, CEO of Bharti Airtel was exploring various options on how best to respond to the situation. He had to take a final call regarding Bharti Airtel’s marketing team’s counter move to tackle this price war by Jio – should Bharti Airtel ignore it, accommodate it or retaliate with even lower prices? Bharti Airtel strongly believed that Jio pricing structure had violated “fair pricing” norms, and its pricing was anti-competitive. It had filed a case with the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) and the Competition Commission of India (CCI) to restrain Jio from further giving “free” promotional offers and penalize it for it. Could the legal recourse by Bharti Airtel dampen Jio’s consistent subscriber growth rate?

Expected learning outcomes

The case provides the students with an insight into how the competition focused on pricing happens in the telecom industry. The pricing war affects the profit margin of all competing companies. It changes the customer reference point for evaluating the competing products and services. The students would also learn practical applications of positive-sum pricing, pricing war, fair pricing and legal aspects of pricing. This case provides the students with an opportunity to understand the pricing war and how to respond to it in a particular situation; understand positive-sum pricing and negative-sum pricing in telecom industry context; understand legal aspects of pricing; and how to leverage data for gaining newer customer insights.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

During a press conference at the Imperial Hotel in Delhi on 13 March 2001, the Internet news site, Tehelka.com, showed secret video footage of senior politicians…

Abstract

During a press conference at the Imperial Hotel in Delhi on 13 March 2001, the Internet news site, Tehelka.com, showed secret video footage of senior politicians, bureaucrats, and army officers accepting money in a fake defense deal. Two journalists from Tehelka, Anirudha Bahal and Mathew Samuel, posed as arms dealers from a fictitious arms company called West End International to sell nonexistent handheld thermal cameras to senior officials of the Ministry of Defense (MOD) in India. Bahal and Samuel paid bribes to politicians, civil servants, and army officers to procure government contracts. The journalists used three hidden cameras to videotape the corrupt politicians and officials accepting the bribes, with the most dramatic video clip showing the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) President, Bangaru Laxman, accepting a wad of currency notes from them. Laxman later claimed that he was not guilty of wrongdoing for accepting Rs. 100,000 (US$2,170) as a donation for the BJP. Describing the episode as “concocted,” he added that he had given the donation to the BJP's treasurer (BBC News, 2001a).

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Hasitha Dinithi Rupasinghe and Chaminda Wijethilake

An alignment between financial and operational measures is an essential element to capture the lean productivity improvements enabling supply chain sustainability. With…

Abstract

Purpose

An alignment between financial and operational measures is an essential element to capture the lean productivity improvements enabling supply chain sustainability. With the aim of supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in addressing corporate sustainability challenges, this study aims to examine the impact of leanness on supply chain sustainability, and the moderating role of sustainability control systems (SCS) on the relationship between leanness and supply chain sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on lean manufacturing and the levers of control framework, survey data was collected from 106 manufacturing SMEs in Sri Lanka. Moderated multiple regression analysis was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The study finds that lean manufacturing practices, such as just-in-time deliveries, quality management, environmental management and employee involvement show a significant positive impact on supply chain sustainability. As proposed, the interactive use of SCS shows a significant, positive moderating impact on the relationship between employee involvement and social supply chain sustainability. The diagnostic use of SCS negatively moderates the relationships between just-in-time deliveries and economic supply chain sustainability, and environmental management and economic supply chain sustainability. However, both interactive and diagnostic uses of SCS do not show any significant moderating impact between lean manufacturing and environmental supply chain sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The following limitations should be taken into account in interpreting the results and implications of this study. Firstly, the study refers to supply chain sustainability as environmental, social and economic sustainability. As these concepts represent broader perspectives of sustainability, and no consensus on how to measure has yet been agreed, future studies may focus on other variables that might capture different perspectives of supply chain sustainability. Secondy, future researchers may further extend the role of SCS (including all four control systems – belief, boundary, interactive and diagnostic) in examining the impact of leanness on supply chain sustainability. Thirdly, this study has considered a sample of manufacturing SMEs in the Western province in Sri Lanka. The results should be carefully generalised to other manufacturing organisations in Sri Lanka and beyond. Finally, future studies may also investigate the impact of leanness on supply chain sustainability by using alternative methodologies, such as multiple case studies.

Originality/value

SMEs are more likely to focus on diagnostic control systems with the aim of promoting economic supply chain sustainability. However, the findings reveal that manufacturing SMEs in the developing country context lack strong SCS to enable supply chain sustainability.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ewan Sutherland

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study drawing on a side range of official documents, including inquiry reports, policies, licences and court judgements.

Findings

Liberalisation of the sector introduced opportunities for lobbying and corruption that lead to very unusual market structures, with many operators and too little spectrum.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with the principals were impossible.

Practical implications

It is now necessary for the government to adopt good governance processes, especially in respect of 4G and th inevitable consolidation of operators in a fair and equitable manner.

Social implications

The governance systems are incapable of controlling the corruption in the telecommunications sector and require substantial redesign.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to relate corporate political activity and corruption to outcomes in the telecommunications sector in India.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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