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Case study
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Ranjitha G.P., Rai Siddhant Sinha, Augustin Paul and R. Sai Shiva Jayanth

After completion of this case, students would be able to understand the challenges faced by social entrepreneurship in a time of pandemic, as well as gain a perspective of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After completion of this case, students would be able to understand the challenges faced by social entrepreneurship in a time of pandemic, as well as gain a perspective of the background, history, evolution and the setup of such organizations; appreciate the role of marketing methods in tackling the challenges faced and how the management of such enterprises could use them on the ground; evaluate possible future options/pathways that could be taken in the backdrop of a pandemic and, more importantly, in a developing country context; and apply the elements of social entrepreneurship theory and suggest a way ahead for ThankUfoods (TUF).

Case overview/synopsis

TUF is a social enterprise that empowers visually and physically challenged people by using while profitably selling food products. Few years of existence, it was facing a major dilemma regarding strategies to continue its existing business and the way forward. Because of the pandemic, the traditional offline business models became redundant on which TUF was heavily dependent. At the same time, TUF had to balance providing support to its employees, staying financially afloat and upholding its parent organization’s core objectives, the India Association for Blind (IAB). IAB was founded to rescue and provide livelihood for specially abled people. TUF was formed as a sister concern that combined charitable work and profit earning to make visually challenged people self-sufficient. At this juncture, the protagonist of the case Mr Abdul Raheem, chief executive officer of TUF and vice president of IAB, approached consultants to chart the way forward. He was forced to explore novel options ranging from conceptual ones, such as setting the right objectives and revisiting mission and vision, to more operational ones, such as venturing into online space, increasing advertisements and achieving breakeven sales. This case study highlights the overall journey of TUF, the underlying constraints, the new challenges faced and the dilemma ahead. Further, it covers the context and challenges peculiar to an emerging market setting. More importantly, it provides a setting for the students to be in the protagonist’s position and ponder – how should a social enterprise functioning in an emerging market function in times of pandemic crises? If it decides to explore novel options, what should be those, how can it proceed, and what to be cautious about.

Complexity academic level

The target audience for the case study are students from MBA and BBA courses, management trainees who are interested to learn about the challenges social entrepreneurship face at the time of crisis. This case study could be used to explain concepts about social entrepreneurship, brand positioning, e-commerce marketing and decision-making in the time of pandemics/crises. The case is also suitable for senior management personnel who participate in executive education programs.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

The subject areas are family-owned business, entrepreneurship and strategic management.

Study level/applicability

The target audiences for the case study are BBA and MBA students and management trainees who are interested in learning about family-owned business and the problems faced by them when generations change. This case can be used to teach concepts in family-owned business and strategic management courses in the context of emerging markets. The case also introduces the problems faced by a traditionally operating organization which has to change to survive in the market. The case can be used to teach senior management teams participating in executive education programs on how problems arise in family-owned business. To successfully work with this case study, students need to have the basic theoretical understanding of family-owned business.

Case overview

Sree Subramania Ayurvedic Nursing home (SSANH), one of the most reputed Ayurvedic treatment centers in Kozhikode, Kerala in India, was converted into its present form in 1974 from Thekkayil Vaidyasala by Thekkayil Rajaratnam Vydiar. The latest addition to this family run nursing home is Dr Sananad Ratnam, who in continuity of his family tradition studied Ayurveda. Dr Sanand wanted to rethink the positioning of the 400-year-old family business system with an objective to increase the number of people served by SSANH. He is armed with ambitious plans to expand SSANH and increase the volume of patients served. Dr Sanand’s father, the second partner of SSANH, was not quite supportive of this idea. His father felt that the increase in scale without compromise in quality was impossible in Ayurveda. Dr Sanand felt handicapped with problems such as lack of marketing strategies, lack of standard managerial procedures, lack of innovation in processes and, more importantly, conflicting ideologies between father and son in the family-owned business. To address these problems, Dr Sanand has recently hired the services of a consulting firm. This case highlights how SSANH, in spite of being in an advantageous position, is unable to exploit its full potential. Further explaining the different ways in which different generations perceive business, this case invites the attention to the dilemma: Should the business proceed with its expansion plan? If it decides to expand, how it should convince the previous generation of the family that the expansion plan accommodates their concerns.

Expected learning outcomes

After completion of this case, students would be able to: gain a perspective on the problems faced by a family-owned business which has successfully survived for decades; understand how a family-owned business functions differently from other business models; evaluate different ways in which the organization can look to solve the dilemma by considering the different stakeholders in question; and apply the result of the literature on family-owned businesses to understand the dynamics of business of this specific setting, i.e. one that has a rich heritage, is in an emerging economy and is a family-owned business.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Reddy Sai Shiva Jayanth, Balaji G. and Gopalakrishnan Narayanamurthy

The learning objectives have been prepared in accordance with the Blooms Taxonomy (Engelhart et al., 1984). After completion of this case, students would be able to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning objectives have been prepared in accordance with the Blooms Taxonomy (Engelhart et al., 1984). After completion of this case, students would be able to examine and expand the concept of institutions (i.e. a sport as an institution in this case) and understand how important it is to incorporate them in the policy level decision-making (Knowledge); understand a different form of the social institution (i.e. Jallikattu) and capture its relevance for all the involved stakeholders by taking into consideration the challenges that could stem from their interplay (Application); analyze the interests of various stakeholders and their concerns that add to the complexity of a socially relevant issue (Analysis); and integrate the developments of an event (i.e. Jallikattu) over its timeline and develop an action plan for being prepared or for resolving such exigencies, especially for public policy decision making (Synthesis).

Case overview/synopsis

The case is centred on Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation whose primary aim is conservation and breeding of native breeds of cattle. The protagonist of the case, Karthikeya Sivasenapathy, managing trustee of this foundation, has invested significant efforts to create awareness on the importance of Jallikattu. Jallikattu is an ancient Indian sport played in the rural regions of Tamil Nadu state in India and has been in existence for over 5,000 years. This issue has come into limelight due to its initial ban by the Supreme Court of India in 2014 and its subsequent stay on the ban in 2016. While there are several arguments surrounding this controversy, the arguments can be broadly classified under those who support the ban (i.e. oppose Jallikattu) and those who oppose the ban (i.e. support Jallikattu). Due to the involvement of various stakeholders (government supreme court, animal welfare boards and breed saviour groups) with conflicting objectives, the dynamics of decision-making to settle this issue became very complicated, confusing and time-consuming for Karthikeya. By using the lens of institutions and stakeholder theory, the authors explain the issue around Jallikattu in this teaching note. Teaching note also documents the unfolding of events that happened after 12 January 2017 which succeeded in lifting the ban on Jallikattu.

Complexity academic level

The case is written for undergraduate and graduate-level students pursuing business programmes and for senior management professionals participating in the executive education programmes. The case is suitable for those who are expected to work in an environment where there is a multitude of complex, formal as well as informal institutions. This case can be used to teach the concepts of institutions, the dynamics involved and to give the flavour of the interactions between these different institutions in solving a social issue. It will fit well into courses on strategic management, social movement and institutional theory.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Srinath Rengarajan, Roger Moser, Louis Tillessen, Gopalakrishnan Narayanamurthy and Sai Shiva Jayanth Reddy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of decision model innovation (DMI), set on the decision-making support for the customers, on customer satisfaction and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of decision model innovation (DMI), set on the decision-making support for the customers, on customer satisfaction and the firm’s competitive productivity (FCP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study operationalizes the concept of DMI by developing a decision support journey (DSJ) model for the airport industry, using the case of Zurich Airport and its ecosystem. This paper then explores how this DSJ impacts the FCP of Zurich Airport.

Findings

This study finds that applying DMI shows potential to improve talent management, resource management and corporate culture, leading to a higher FCP. By centralizing the decision-making process of its customer and decision support, executives gain essential insights into the actual needs of their customers. This enables firms to adapt their products and services to the actual needs of the customer, which leads to higher performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores the complementarity between DMI and FCP, exploring how operationalizing the concept through DSJ impacts FCP elements, including talent management, resource management and overall corporate culture. This extends extant work on improving non-aeronautical revenues in dynamic environments within airport ecosystems as a converging industry setting.

Practical implications

Existing airport digital applications providing minimal support should be expanded to provide an interaction and exchange platform for airport ecosystem players and customers. This paper finds that the firm adopting DMI in the airport/airline industry can set up a win-win situation to achieve competitive productivity by providing decision-making support and valuable insights to its customers.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to apply DMI toward improving FCP in the airport industry. It treats airports as an ecosystem of converging industries that can benefit by incorporating customer-focused digitally-enabled solutions to improve decision-making and customer satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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