Search results

1 – 10 of 72
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1933

R. Giacomelli

ON April 10 Warrant‐Officer Francesco Agello of the Italian Air Force set up a new speed record of 682–403 k.p.h. (424 m.p.h.) over a 3‐kilometre course at Lake Garda in a…

Abstract

ON April 10 Warrant‐Officer Francesco Agello of the Italian Air Force set up a new speed record of 682–403 k.p.h. (424 m.p.h.) over a 3‐kilometre course at Lake Garda in a Macchi Castoldi 72 seaplane with a 2,500‐h.p. Fiat A.S.6 engine.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1929

R. Giacomelli

THE Società Anonima Officine Meccaniche Fuscaldo of Brescia has recently produced a series of four aero‐engines, and will soon be starting a second series.

Abstract

THE Società Anonima Officine Meccaniche Fuscaldo of Brescia has recently produced a series of four aero‐engines, and will soon be starting a second series.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 1 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1933

R. Giacomelli

SIGNOR L. STIPA, of the Italian Air Ministry, started in 1927 an examination of a Venturi tube fuselage with an air‐screw placed at the mouth of the tube, which was so…

Abstract

SIGNOR L. STIPA, of the Italian Air Ministry, started in 1927 an examination of a Venturi tube fuselage with an air‐screw placed at the mouth of the tube, which was so shaped internally as to conform exactly to the slipstream of the airscrew (Fig. 1). The slipstream, issuing from the rear part of the Venturi tube, should, according to his theory, supply an additional thrust (reaction) along the tube, thus increasing the airscrew thrust.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1932

R. Giacomelli

ALTHOUGH built in 1929, the Caproni 90 P.B. bombing machine still remains the largest landplane in the world, and holds all the world's records for load carrying, the…

Abstract

ALTHOUGH built in 1929, the Caproni 90 P.B. bombing machine still remains the largest landplane in the world, and holds all the world's records for load carrying, the maximum useful load carried being 15,000 kg. (approximately 15 tons).

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1931

R. Giacomelli

A METAL version of the famous Savoia S.55 twin‐hull seaplane has been constructed to the designs of Signor G. Gabrielle by the Societa Anonima Piaggio, of Pisa, and as a…

Abstract

A METAL version of the famous Savoia S.55 twin‐hull seaplane has been constructed to the designs of Signor G. Gabrielle by the Societa Anonima Piaggio, of Pisa, and as a result an interesting comparison between wood and metal construction has been obtained. The metal seaplane, precisely the same in all respects, including equipment, as its wooden prototype, has effected a saving in weight of 535 kgs. (1,177 lb.), with a “factor of safety” of 9 as against 7.4.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

James T. Luxhoj and Gene A. Giacomelli

The development of labour standards for the single truss tomatoproduction system is examined. Both time study and predetermined timesystems, such as the Element Times for…

Abstract

The development of labour standards for the single truss tomato production system is examined. Both time study and predetermined time systems, such as the Element Times for Agriculture (ETA) tables and the Maynard Operation Sequence Technique (MOST) tables, are used to determine labour standards for the operations of pruning and harvesting in a single truss tomato production system. The hypothesis is that a predetermined time system could be used to establish greenhouse labour standards, and thus replace the tedious and costly process of direct time study. Such a work measurement system would enable the setting of job standards quickly and accurately. Standardised work models will facilitate cost control of labour operations, and provide data for evaluation of labour costs within future greenhouse system designs. The data indicate that, although the pre‐determined time values varied from measured time study by around 6 per cent to over 23 per cent for pruning, the variation for harvesting ranged approximately from 3 per cent to 7 per cent. The combined results suggest that predetermined time systems can be used effectively to establish greenhouse labour standards for short cycle tasks without the loss of significant accuracy when using an absolute scale.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1929

R. Giacomelli

IN the development of Italian Aeronautics four periods can be distinguished: A first period, covering the fifteenth, sixteenth and seven‐teenth centuries, in which the…

Abstract

IN the development of Italian Aeronautics four periods can be distinguished: A first period, covering the fifteenth, sixteenth and seven‐teenth centuries, in which the first idea of the technical possibility of human flight, both on the heavier and on lighter than air principles, was conceived in Italy, and the physico‐mechanical conditions of animal flight explained. In this period are to bo met the names of Leonardo da Vinci, Francesco Lana, Alfonso Borelli working on independent lines. A second period, in which Italy produced a number of distinguished aeronauts, among whom Vincenzo Lunardi and Francesco Zambeccari became well known in England for having carried out in London the first balloon ascents in 1784–85. In this period, which starting with the discovery of the Brothers Montgolfier, docs not go farther than the first decades of the nineteenth century, Italy did not combine with an interest in practical air navigation any actual scientific contribution to its development. A third period, in which Italy entered the scientific field. In this period, which covers the time from the last twenty‐five years of the nineteenth century to the end of the Great War, we find two principal names: Enrico Forlanini and Arturo Crocco. Finally the present period, subsequent to the war. On the work of Leonardo da Vinci on human flight a definite opinion can now be expressed. He arrived, after a long evolution of ideas, at the same solution which humanity actually realised towards the end of the past century with Otto Lilienthal in Germany, and his successors in several countries: Pilcher in England, Ferbcr in France, Chanute and the Brothers Wright in America. In fact Leonardo da Vinci, having started, like Lilientlial, from the imitation of the flapping flight of birds, came, at the end, like the latter, to soaring flight. The difference between the two lies in this: Lilienthal was compelled from flapping to soaring, or rather gliding flight, through practical experiments; Leonardo da Vinci, who never attained to actual construction and tests, through mental experiments.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 1 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1936

N.A. de Bruyne and J.N. Maas

SYNTHETIC resins reinforced with fahric have proved in actual service to be not only resistant to disintegration from shocks and vibration but also to have remarkable…

Abstract

SYNTHETIC resins reinforced with fahric have proved in actual service to be not only resistant to disintegration from shocks and vibration but also to have remarkable freedom from “notch sensitivity.” In order to investigate this property measurements were made of the energy absorbed by such materials under torsional oscillation; it was found that the energy absorbed was greater than that of any other comparable materials (such as wood or metal).

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 8 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1939

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and publications of other similar research bodies as issued

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1930

R.J. De Marolles

CONSTRUCTORS of metal aeroplanes since 1910, Messrs. Breguet have recently turned out a new machine which represents a complete breakaway from accepted practice. After…

Abstract

CONSTRUCTORS of metal aeroplanes since 1910, Messrs. Breguet have recently turned out a new machine which represents a complete breakaway from accepted practice. After acquiring a thorough experience of light alloy construction in the past ten years with their world‐known Breguet 19, they have been led to reconsider the problem of design from the very beginning and to introduce an entirely new conception.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of 72