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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Quynh-Trang Nguyen, Ming-Yen Lee and Yi-Chung Hu

This study aims to concentrate on a specific perspective that has mostly been ignored: employees in social enterprises (SEs). It proposes that employees in SEs should be…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to concentrate on a specific perspective that has mostly been ignored: employees in social enterprises (SEs). It proposes that employees in SEs should be treated with equal importance to outside beneficiaries within the SEs’ value-creating mission.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study approach is adopted, and semi-structured interviews are the primary means of data collection.

Findings

The results show that while economic values are fundamental for the employment relationship, social values play the leading role in employees’ motivation; thus, they can significantly affect the organization’s operation and development.

Research limitations/implications

This work contributes to Maslow’s need theory and psychological contract theory regarding their application to SEs. Practical lessons and suggestions are also provided for SEs’ development.

Originality/value

By emphasizing the value-creating mission of SEs with the new perspective of including employees in it, this work provides empirical evidence and practical lessons for SEs, especially Asian SEs, in terms of management and strategy.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Thi Quynh Trang Nguyen

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a view of gender discrimination in Vietnam via the lens of thê diên – the Vietnamese face concept.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a view of gender discrimination in Vietnam via the lens of thê diên – the Vietnamese face concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on results of a PhD exploratory study of the Vietnamese face concept thê diên. Semi-structured indepth interviews were conducted with 15 Vietnamese college teachers about the notion of thê diên in relation with several areas including gender.

Findings

There are two ways in which gender discrimination is reflected in the participants’ perceptions of thê diên. First, there is discrimination in terms of the different language used for men and women in terms of face. Second, there are different social expectations for men and women in terms of thê diên. Specifically, in order to maintain thê diên, men are expected to prove themselves as sources of the family income and social status. Meanwhile, women are only supposed to maintain their men’s face.

Originality/value

While the gender situation in Vietnam has been examined via various social, economical, and political perspectives, it has never been filtered through the lens of face, a cultural concept that deeply reflects living and behaving principles of a cultural community in a certain time.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Thi Quynh Trang Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several cultural and psychological aspects that the author experienced in the interview fieldwork with Vietnamese and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several cultural and psychological aspects that the author experienced in the interview fieldwork with Vietnamese and the strategies to deal with these methodological issues. It aims to assist non-Vietnamese researchers planning their qualitative fieldwork with Vietnamese participants.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are drawn from using an autoethnographic approach, in which the author presents and analyses the experiences of conducting individual semi-structured interviews with 15 Vietnamese college teachers in the PhD qualitative study on the Vietnamese concept of facethê diên.

Findings

The author argues that in interviews with Vietnamese participants, an interviewer should be mindful of the interviewees’ unfamiliarity with the ethics approval procedure, their reliance on relationship and trust, their self-face concern and low level of elaboration. It is important that the interviewer be seen as an “insider” by the Vietnamese interviewees, not an “objective” outsider researcher. In addition, an interviewer needs to be sensitive to detect any subtle cues that may emerge, and be flexible enough to adjust the interview questions if necessary and employ suitable techniques to adapt to these changes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings were limited to the scope of experiences within a PhD study with a small group of college teachers. Experiences with larger groups of Vietnamese participants from diverse backgrounds may be needed to confirm the findings of this paper.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the gap in the discussion of conducting qualitative research with the Vietnamese. It also discusses several issues that have not been discussed before, such as the Vietnamese unfamiliarity with the paperwork required for ethics approval and their face concerns in interviews.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Nozomi Kawarazuka and Gordon Prain

This paper aims to explore ethnic minority women’s gendered perceptions and processes of agricultural innovation in the Northern uplands of Vietnam. The key research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore ethnic minority women’s gendered perceptions and processes of agricultural innovation in the Northern uplands of Vietnam. The key research question asks how women develop innovations and learn new agricultural practices within patriarchal family structures.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews including life histories were conducted with 17 female and 10 male farmers from different socio-economic groups; participant observation and key informant interviews were also carried out.

Findings

Women’s innovation processes are deeply embedded in their positions as wives and daughters-in-law. Their innovation tends to be incremental, small-scale and less technological, and they use innovation networks of women rather than those of the formal agricultural institutions, including bringing innovation knowledge from their birth family to the patrilocal household. Unlike men’s perceived innovation, women’s innovation is strongly linked to small-scale entrepreneurship, and it is a powerful approach in the sense that it strengthens the position of women in their families while improving the household economy.

Research limitations/implications

Identifying socially constructed innovation processes helps policymakers to rethink the introduction of ready-made innovation packages, both in terms of content and delivery, and to facilitate innovation for women, as well as men, in marginalized positions.

Social implications

Understanding the gendered processes of innovation instead of measuring gender gaps in innovation outcomes sheds light on women’s interests and preferences, which can inform policies for supporting women’s innovation and thereby lead to social change, including gender equity.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of gendered innovation processes and entrepreneurship associated with agriculture in rural areas in non-Western ethnic-minority contexts, which is an area that past and current research on entrepreneurship has relatively ignored.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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