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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Rebecca G. W. Mueller

Social studies research has long advocated inquiry as a desired instructional practice, but the increasing emphasis on the role students’ questions should play in inquiry…

Abstract

Social studies research has long advocated inquiry as a desired instructional practice, but the increasing emphasis on the role students’ questions should play in inquiry requires research into what social studies teachers can do to elevate the place of student questioning in classrooms. This study examined the attitudes and actions of two secondary social studies teachers who self-identified as advocates of student questioning and who desired to incorporate more student questioning into their instruction. This study used qualitative research methods and generated data through multiple interviews and classroom observations with each participant along with content analysis of classroom materials. Findings suggest that even though the participants approached student questioning in unique ways, they shared a need for curricular control, often triggered by the pressures of standardized assessments, which influenced how they incorporated student questioning into their classrooms. This study provides valuable insight into the promise of student questioning and factors that must be addressed if teachers are to incorporate student questioning in ways that foster meaningful inquiry.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Wilson Ozuem and Geoff Lancaster

The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections between questioning, learning, achievement and conscious knowledge and beliefs held by tutors and how these are…

2736

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections between questioning, learning, achievement and conscious knowledge and beliefs held by tutors and how these are applied in a teaching/learning situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this study involved the authors listening to, but not participating in, classroom teaching sessions followed by individual in-depth discussions with tutors and students to ascertain how best to advance learning and achievement.

Findings

Responses generated from questioning and dialogue helps tutors realign their teaching in response to the needs of learners including comprehending life issues and solving problems. Tutors should consider “think-pair share strategy” in their delivery.

Research limitations/implications

Research was limited to one specific location, the sample was self-selected and limited to tutors who volunteered to take part in the investigation. A greater number of experimental locations with 100 per cent participation would have enhanced the validity of the findings.

Practical implications

Learners need to be motivated to ask questions and be encouraged to become involved in discussions. Questioning and dialogue provide a framework for sharing educational objectives with students and charting their progress and this can lead to a better framework for delivery and understanding.

Social implications

If tutors can better realign their teaching in response to the needs of learners including comprehending life issues and solving problems then this can lead to a more focused learning experience.

Originality/value

The work was based on empirical investigations of tutors and learners in group and individual situations and the findings have been reported.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Mark E. Hill, John McGinnis and Jane Cromartie

This paper seeks to examine the pivotal guiding role of “marketing thinking” in an organization, to identify the obstacles to marketing thinking, explaining how they…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the pivotal guiding role of “marketing thinking” in an organization, to identify the obstacles to marketing thinking, explaining how they hinder its implementation, and offering strategies to minimize those negative effects, and thereby, to enable improved marketing thinking and enhanced performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature is synthesized, to derive a definition of marketing thinking before a conceptual framework is developed, on the basis of which to discuss the potential obstacles.

Findings

In viewing marketing thinking as type of questioning, potential obstacles are found to be: what is “familiar” typical questioning practices, and a “static” orientation. Identification and examination of the source and impact of each obstacle can in turn allow for enhanced understanding of both the detrimental effects and the potential benefits of effective counter‐action.

Research limitations/implications

Three types of obstacles to marketing thinking are identified and discussed, but there is no intended implication that only those three exist. If marketing planners will treat marketing thinking as a type of questioning behavior, the identification of additional obstacles is not only possible but likely. Future research can move the agenda in that direction.

Practical implications

Understanding marketing thinking as a special type of questioning is key to developing strategies and plans which allow for maintaining a meaningfully differentiated position in a constantly changing environment of continuously differentiated products and services. Confronting the obstacles to marketing thinking will facilitate that objective.

Originality/value

New strategies are offered to enable practitioners to work around the obstacles to marketing thinking, thereby improving its value as a tool in marketing intelligence and planning.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Tim Gorichanaz

A good scholarly publication sparks new questions for future research. In the same way, many kinds of information experiences drive questioning. This is a novel…

Abstract

A good scholarly publication sparks new questions for future research. In the same way, many kinds of information experiences drive questioning. This is a novel counterpoint to the traditional view that information and documents simply provide answers to queries. Research suggests that questioning is a crucial component in the building of understanding. Questioning is often defined linguistically, as a certain kind of utterance, but more deeply it can be understood as an openness to what the world can offer – the beginning of thought, and the medium by which information informs. In this chapter, I consider questioning through the lens of document work, which entails the myriad behaviors and activities related to documents in a given setting, including both the creation of new documents and dealing with existing documents (using, sharing, copying, destroying, etc.). If a document provides an answer, then document work can be conceptualized as the building of understanding, and questioning is the mechanism by which understanding is built. These concepts offer a framework for investigating document use as an experience.

Details

Information Experience in Theory and Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-368-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Kouider Mokhtari, Carine Strebel, Florin Mihai and Edwidge Crevecoeur-Bryant

In this chapter, the authors provide an introspective account of how teachers in mainstream classrooms can use questioning to more effectively differentiate literacy…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors provide an introspective account of how teachers in mainstream classrooms can use questioning to more effectively differentiate literacy instruction for English learners across subject areas. The authors offer a rationale for constructively responsive questioning and share tools and strategies for adapting levels of questioning to students’ English proficiency and grade levels with the goal of strengthening instruction and promoting student engagement in learning.

Details

What’s Hot in Literacy: Exemplar Models of Effective Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-874-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Youngho Park and Dae Hee Kwak

The current study aims to provide a systematic approach to detecting and identifying social desirability bias (SDB) in survey data using controversial sponsorship as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to provide a systematic approach to detecting and identifying social desirability bias (SDB) in survey data using controversial sponsorship as a research context.

Design/methodology/approach

We used an experimental approach to manipulate sponsorship situations (e.g. Beer sponsor vs Sports drink sponsor) that could potentially motivate respondents to under-report their perceptions toward the sponsor. By employing both procedural and statistical approaches, our evidence shows that responses toward the controversial sponsor were in fact contaminated by SDB.

Findings

The findings of the study provide methodological and practical implications for how sport marketing scholars and practitioners can identify, detect and control SDB in self-report data.

Originality/value

We argue that some survey research in sport marketing may be prone to SDB, but SDB has not received sufficient attention in sport marketing research. We emphasize the importance of detecting (and avoiding/controlling) SDB in sport management research.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Kimberlee S. Burrows, Martine B. Powell and Mairi Benson

Interviewing victims of child sex abuse requires considerable care in order to minimise error. Due to children’s heightened suggestibility any question asked of a child…

Abstract

Purpose

Interviewing victims of child sex abuse requires considerable care in order to minimise error. Due to children’s heightened suggestibility any question asked of a child could potentially incite error that could undermine the witness’s credibility. A focus group was conducted in order to facilitate the development of guidance for interviewers around the circumstances in which it is necessary to ask children follow-up questions in an interview. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven Crown prosecutors representing every Australian state and territory (with the exception of one small state) were issued with 25 hypothetical narrative accounts of child abuse and asked to indicate what information, if any, required follow-up in the child’s narrative. Their responses and rationale for requiring following up in some cases and not others were discussed.

Findings

Thematic analysis revealed three recommendations to guide questioning: whether the case involved identification or recognition evidence; the presence of contextual features that may influence the witness’s memory, or that should trigger a particular line of questioning; and whether the information can or should be sought at a later stage by the trial prosecutor, rather than by the interviewer.

Practical implications

The recommendations are discussed within the context of their implications for interviewing, that is, how each recommendation could be implemented in practice.

Originality/value

The present study extends prior literature by elucidating principles to guide decision making across interview topic areas. The need for such guidance is highlighted by research suggesting that topics such as offender identity, offence time and place, and witnesses are a source of overzealous questioning in interviews.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2015

Lynn Allyson Kelley and Lee Freeman

Although there is a lack of research on instruction that aims at facilitating students’ use of questioning with peers, many early childhood social studies textbooks and…

Abstract

Although there is a lack of research on instruction that aims at facilitating students’ use of questioning with peers, many early childhood social studies textbooks and resources, include activities and lessons recommending students conduct interviews with an explicit assumption that young students are capable of formulating and using questions in the context of an interview. In these instances, no suggestions or ideas are given to teachers regarding instruction that will encourage and facilitate students’ questioning. The purpose of this study was to determine if the levels of social studies interview questions second graders formulate and use can be increased with questioning instruction in terms of quality, which is defined as depth of response, and in terms of quantity. This study generated research hypotheses that could be investigated in future research on instruction aimed at increasing young children’s questioning abilities as demonstrated in social studies.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Utpal M. Dholakia

This chapter reviews research on the question–behavior effect, the phenomenon that asking questions influences respondents’ behavior. Two distinct research streams, the…

Abstract

This chapter reviews research on the question–behavior effect, the phenomenon that asking questions influences respondents’ behavior. Two distinct research streams, the self-prophecy effect, concerned with socially normative behaviors, and the mere measurement effect, dealing with purchase behaviors without socially normative significance, are identified. Despite the recent attempt at integration, it is argued that there are fundamental differences between the two effects. Distinctions are also drawn between lab-based and field-based mere measurement effects, and between normatively consistent and implicit attitude-driven, normatively inconsistent self-prophecy effects. Key studies, theoretical explanations, and moderators of each effect are discussed, potential unanswered questions and research opportunities are identified, and significant managerial and policy implications are highlighted.

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-475-8

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Kenneth David Strang

A quasi‐experiment compared two instructional approaches for an existing MBA online business strategy course at an accredited university to answer the question: how can…

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Abstract

Purpose

A quasi‐experiment compared two instructional approaches for an existing MBA online business strategy course at an accredited university to answer the question: how can discussion questions become more effective in online MBA courses? The treatment was an instructional approach that integrated Socratic questioning and conversation theory in a discussion forum. This paper aims to document the research.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlation and ANOVA were utilized to test the hypothesis that more online experiential knowledge interactions would increase grade. Quasi‐experimental controls included prior ability and demographic factors (gender, age, ethnic race). The test group used Socratic questions and conversation theory while the control group used the traditional peer interaction. A statistically significant ANOVA model was created, using teaching method as a factor, to measure effect on grade.

Findings

The online interactions of the test group were higher and so was the mean grade. The MANCOVA model was able to pinpoint why. Prior ability was ruled out as a moderating factor.

Research limitations/implications

The implications were cited as an increasing need to use high quality instructional methods for online courses, which requires student interaction. Experienced faculty are difficult (and expensive) to hire, and thus this represents an important requirement to identify for faculty development and selection during recruiting. The teaching method could work with other online e‐learning courses disciplines.

Originality/value

A solid scientific methodology was applied using advanced statistical techniques yet the explanations are very basic and clear. Socratic questioning and conversation theory were integrated as an instructional strategy to improve online MBA course interactions and grades.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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