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Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Allain Joly

Since Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class published in 2000, our attention has been drawn towards a peculiar characteristic of the cities where such a…

Abstract

Since Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class published in 2000, our attention has been drawn towards a peculiar characteristic of the cities where such a creative class thrives, and that is tolerance. We intend to explore in this paper whether one can use Hofstede’s “Uncertainty Avoidance” dimension to ponder if societies that are “Uncertainty avoidant” can provide a nurturing soil for a creative class to emerge within their bosom. To discuss this question, we examine the case of the Province of Québec (Canada) and most specifically, that of the city of Montréal, a city that has been dubbed by many observers as a creative city. In other words, our question is can a creative class thrive in a city that is located in an “Uncertainty avoidant” cultural and political unit?

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Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2017

Sofiane Baba and Emmanuel Raufflet

Stakeholder thinking has contributed considerably to the organizational literature by demonstrating the significance of the environment in managing organizations…

Abstract

Stakeholder thinking has contributed considerably to the organizational literature by demonstrating the significance of the environment in managing organizations. Stakeholders affect and are affected by organizations’ daily operations and decisions. They have varied and often conflicting interests, making it necessary for managers and organizations to know who they are as well as their attributes. Consequently, Mitchell et al. (1997) developed the stakeholder salience theory to help managers and organizations identify the power of certain stakeholders and their salience to the organization. With a few exceptions, the mainstream stakeholder salience theory is in many ways still largely static, short-term oriented, and firm-centered. The aim of this paper is to revisit certain conformist assumptions concerning the role of marginalized stakeholders, or “dormant” stakeholders, in stakeholder thinking. Overall, this chapter is a call to a new conceptualization of stakeholders that reintroduces stakeholder dynamics at the core of stakeholder thinking to overcome its restrictive shortcomings. We argue that managing stakeholder relationships is not simply meeting stakeholder demands but also involves taking into account the long-term dynamics of stakeholder interactions.

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Marie (Aurélie) Thériault

The Printemps Érable has become a landmark event in the history of Québec’s student movement. The Printemps Érable protesters expressed demands on several fronts…

Abstract

The Printemps Érable has become a landmark event in the history of Québec’s student movement. The Printemps Érable protesters expressed demands on several fronts, including the freezing of tuition fees, free education, the preservation of a just and universal student loans and bursaries programme, the right of access to higher education for all the province’s youth and freedom of association. The 2012 movement echoed protests in the 1950s. This chapter provides an overview of the history of student protest over fees and access to higher education in Québec and considers its implications for student struggles more widely. The Printemps Érable ultimately led to the freezing of tuition fees. It also ensured the preservation of the universal student loan and bursary programme, and reaffirmed the students’ right to free association. This chapter gives an historical overview of the student protest movement in Quebec, and ponders its impact on student struggles everywhere.

Details

Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Abstract

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The Peripatetic Journey of Teacher Preparation in Canada
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-239-1

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Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2017

Jean-Pierre Dupuis

In this chapter, we will be describing the situation of minority groups in the labour market and in organizations in Québec and Canada. We will be focussing mainly on the…

Abstract

In this chapter, we will be describing the situation of minority groups in the labour market and in organizations in Québec and Canada. We will be focussing mainly on the situation of women and ethnocultural minorities. First, we will present a statistical picture of their situation. Second, we will explore in more depth the situation of two ethnocultural groups – the Maghrebians and the French – in Québec, 1 to demonstrate the complexity of the situation of minority groups that cannot be portrayed by statistics alone. Then, third, we will examine some tensions specific to Western societies that have an impact on the dynamics of culturally diverse enterprises. This assessment will show that even though much progress has been made, especially for women, there is still much to do to ensure full equality and greater fairness between minority and majority groups in Québec and Canada. Furthermore, by means of a more qualitative analysis of the situation of these two ethnocultural groups, we will see that statistics do not tell the whole story.

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Management and Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-550-8

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Louis Jacques Filion and Mircea‐Gabriel Chirita

Claude Blanchet was the first Director General of the Société de développement des coopératives du Québec (Cooperative Development Corporation), founding President of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Claude Blanchet was the first Director General of the Société de développement des coopératives du Québec (Cooperative Development Corporation), founding President of the FTQ's Fonds de solidarité (Quebec Federation of Labour Solidarity Fund) and Chief Executive Officer of the SGF (Société générale de financement du Québec, or General Investment Corporation of Québec). His lifelong passion has been to support the development of Québec, and he describes himself as being primarily a “builder of collective firms.” The purpose of this paper is to describe the life of a man who was exposed to an entrepreneurial culture from early childhood.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a case study – interview with the intrapreneur.

Findings

The paper shows that Claude Blanchet's values changed significantly as a result of his involvement in social movements. His goal became to build a modern Québec state. One of the elements characterizing his entire career is undoubtedly his courage in choosing to take unusual paths. This desire to explore and conquer new spaces is shared by most entrepreneurial actors. However, Claude Blanchet did it for reasons related to the development of Québec society.

Originality/value

One of the notable features of this case is the unusual career path taken by Claude Blanchet.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Carol-Anne Gauthier

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of obstacles to socioeconomic integration faced by highly-skilled immigrant women (HSIW) to Quebec, followed by a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of obstacles to socioeconomic integration faced by highly-skilled immigrant women (HSIW) to Quebec, followed by a discussion of Quebec’s socio-political context and interculturalism, in an effort to better situate these obstacles. With these in mind, implications for diversity management are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is largely based on a review of the immigrant integration, interculturalism and diversity management literatures pertaining to the socioeconomic integration of highly-skilled immigrants. It focusses on the socioeconomic integration of HSIW in the Quebec context.

Findings

The authors find that researchers should continue to examine aspects of the social and political contexts in which immigrant integration and diversity management take place when conducting studies in these areas. The authors also encourage continued research pertaining to specific groups, as these may bring to light-specific dynamics that can lead to exclusion.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for diversity management in organizations seeking to foster inclusive practices with regards to ethnic minorities and immigrants in general, and HSIW in particular.

Originality/value

The paper sheds new light on immigrant integration and diversity management in Quebec by bridging the gap between three areas of study that are interconnected but seldom discussed together: socioeconomic integration of immigrants, interculturalism and diversity management in organizations.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Golnaz Golnaraghi and Albert J. Mills

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between neo‐colonialist discourse and Quebec's proposed Bill 94 aimed at restricting the public activities of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between neo‐colonialist discourse and Quebec's proposed Bill 94 aimed at restricting the public activities of niqab and veil‐wearing Muslim women.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon postcolonial feminist frames, this study critically analyzes the discourses of Muslim women and Western elites that serve to construct the niqab and veil‐wearing Muslim women. Using critical discourse analysis of digital and print media articles from 1994 to 2010, the authors trace the discursive character of the Muslim woman related to Bill 94 which proposes the banning of religious face coverings when seeking public services in the Province of Quebec, Canada.

Findings

This paper develops a postcolonial understanding of the discursive conditions that constitute the social environment in which Muslim women are required to operate in Quebec and the advent of Bill 94. The authors contend that the discourses in the construction of Muslim women have mutated over time towards Western cultural hegemony and paternalism, and, in the process, Muslim women have been constructed as oppressed, in need of saving, and at the same time not to be trusted.

Research limitations/implications

The account of events in this paper offer an alternative lens in privileging some of the embedded beliefs and values behind dominant cultural accounts of Quebec in relation to Muslim women and Bill 94. Future scholars may wish to extend this study through examining discourses of secular, veil and niqab‐wearing Muslim women; newcomers, those living in Canada for a longer period and those born in Canada; as well as those from different countries of origin. Another area of research that is ripe for exploration is workplace experiences of Muslim women in Canada. Additionally, examination of overt and subtle discrimination faced by Muslim women would provide important insights into employment equity and human rights.

Originality/value

This paper presents a close look at public discourses around the niqab and Muslim women in Canada, demonstrating the persistence of colonial dynamics and mindsets influencing how issues regarding minority groups are evaluated today.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Marc Alain, Danny Dessureault, Natacha Brunelle and Chantal Crête

The purpose of this paper is to examine Loto‐Quebec's strategy as it adopts the new concept called Ludoplex.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Loto‐Quebec's strategy as it adopts the new concept called Ludoplex.

Design/methodology/approach

The stakeholders' (public health representatives and police officials) viewpoint is obtained during interviews.

Findings

This paper concludes that the next year and a half will be decisive for the survival of a marketing strategy that still has to prove its worthiness.

Practical implications

This paper describes a new type of gaming operation that is compatible with an entertainment complex attracting families and older children. The concept has a potential for application in tourism destinations that allow gaming.

Originality/value

The paper provides the viewpoint of the new strategy announced by Loto‐Quebec by interviewing the stakeholders. It offers practical viewpoint for readers.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Pierre‐Olivier Pineau and Vincent Lefebvre

This paper aims at assessing the actual use of interregional transmission lines and the opportunity cost of unused capacity. The 13 electric power lines connecting the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at assessing the actual use of interregional transmission lines and the opportunity cost of unused capacity. The 13 electric power lines connecting the province of Quebec (Canada) to its neighbours (New Brunswick, New England, New York, Ontario) are analysed for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Design/methodology/approach

Hourly electricity transmission data from the Quebec Open Access Same‐Time Information System (OASIS) are analysed and matched with hourly market prices in New Brunswick, New England, New York and Ontario, for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Findings

Capacity factors of about 50 per cent are found for these lines. Although increasing from 2006 to 2008, this finding shows that interregional lines are far from being heavily congested. Furthermore, about 25 TWh of additional profitable exports could have taken place every year, given the market conditions and the availability of transmission lines. These exports represented an opportunity cost of about $1 billion per year.

Research limitations/implications

Other network constraints and transaction costs could explain why these profitable transactions have not taken place. However, the lack of available energy most likely explains why exports were limited. The opportunity cost could also be overestimated by not taking into account the price impact of additional exports.

Practical implications

Price regulation in Quebec (with priority given to local loads) should be reviewed to maximize economic efficiency and environmental benefits in the Northeast region.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of the use of interregional electricity transmission lines. It provides a preliminary estimate of the economic cost of not further integrating different neighbouring regions.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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