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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Ashish Thomas

Most successful companies have adopted some type of improvement methodology to achieve optimum performance, high quality, lower costs and productivity. Some of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Most successful companies have adopted some type of improvement methodology to achieve optimum performance, high quality, lower costs and productivity. Some of the structured methodologies employed indiscriminately are total quality management, quality control, agile, lean and Six Sigma which yield varied results. The purpose of this paper is to explore how to harness the power of an integrated system of quality tools and techniques to create operational excellence. An integrated framework involves matching quality tools and techniques to the multi-phases (input, transformation and output) of lean manufacturing or service ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

Current research of lean quality systems provides a conceptual understanding of core tools employed by manufacturing and service organizations. Interviewing domain experts from a series of manufacturing and service organizations highlighted a common challenge. The challenge was lean tools and methodologies were selected and employed arbitrarily for the different operational phases, which resulted in selective synergies of tools between operational phases. This limitation resulted in rework and duplication of quality efforts through the diverse phases of the transformation system. This study is based on the hypothesis that all phases of an operational system must be linked by common tools and methodologies which enables harnessing quality benefits and synergies throughout the entire operational system. The study methodology trailed through cooperative inquiry using a case study approach to design an integrated framework of tools that facilitates a common platform for manufacturing or service ecosystems.

Findings

This study suggests that quality systems in a complex competitive environment must consider an integrated iterative approach. An iterative development of lean quality tools for multiple phases produces an integrated quality system. Such systems employ blending and extending of lean quality tools to multiple phases of the transformation system to synthesize agile and versatile quality system.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that the research of integrated framework is based on repertory grid technique only; it should be supplemented by other methods. Second, the proposed framework does not consider the complexity added by the internal and external stakeholders as they interface with the integrated system at different points with reference to phases of the system.

Practical implications

One of the advantages of this method is its generality, instead of delivering a monolithic system at the culmination of long transformation process we rely on smaller quality sprints which are implemented sequentially at each stage or phase of the transformation system. The phenomena of incremental clustering of time-series of quality sprints for different phases results in true integration from end to end for a transformation system.

Social implications

This study helps investigate the personal constructs that users and managers employ to interpret and select quality tools or methodologies for the different phases of lean transformational system.

Originality/value

This study aims to understand the impact of blending quality and business process improvement tools and methodologies to enhance outcomes. The basis of this study is “the power of multiplicity” through which a diverse collection of improvement paths is pooled into an integrated framework of quality tools for lean and efficient operations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Manjeet Kharub, Shah Limon and Rajiv Kumar Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the quality tool’s impact on the effectiveness of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)-based food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the quality tool’s impact on the effectiveness of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)-based food safety system and correlation studies between HACCP effectiveness and business performance in food and pharmaceutical industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 116 survey responses of prominent food and pharmaceutical firms are used to fulfil the aim of this study. The principal component analysis (PCA) method was applied to classify quality tools into a finite number of groups. Further, multiple regression methods are employed to investigate the correlation between HACCP effectiveness and firm’s performance indicators.

Findings

Quality tools are classified into three categories on the basis of their application by using the PCA method: quality tools for hazard identification, quality tools for hazard analysis (QTHA) and quality tools for hazard control. The regression analysis revealed that QTHA has a substantial impact on HACCP objectives (hazard identification, hazard assessment and hazard control). Additionally, the results suggest that the successful implementation of HACCP-based food safety system also delivers a direct influence on the operational and financial performance of the food and pharmaceutical industries.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing body of HACCP knowledge by providing a framework supported by an empirical case study. The case study clustered quality tools into three broad categories related to their application of a HACCP project. Study results can guide and motivate managers to use quality tools with the aim of successful implantation of the HACCP-based food safety system, especially in food and pharmaceutical industries.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

H.S. Bunney and B.G. Dale

Outlines the main findings of a longitudinal study into the use and application of quality management tools and techniques in a speciality chemicals manufacturer. Finds…

Abstract

Outlines the main findings of a longitudinal study into the use and application of quality management tools and techniques in a speciality chemicals manufacturer. Finds that the use of a particular tool or technique is related to the stage of development of the organization’s improvement process and, in the early phase of the improvement process, tools and techniques were used in a haphazard manner, which improved with operating experience. Points out that those tools and techniques which were introduced in relation to a defined need were better understood and utilized than those which were applied company‐wide and without a specific use in mind at the time of the training. Highlights the fact that soundly based training delivered by credible trainers is vital to early success in the use of tools and techniques.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Mustafa M. Rashid and Hossam Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to describe a generic method and tool for assessing the reliability and robustness of the product development process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a generic method and tool for assessing the reliability and robustness of the product development process.

Design/methodology/approach

By extending the integrated definition for function modelling (IDEF0)‐based modelling approach, the paper demonstrates how to calculate the effectiveness of the process and the quality of the process output based on the quality of inputs, the controls and the tools used within the process. To illustrate and validate the proposed approach, it is applied to a case study of a product development process incorporating incomplete, fuzzy and uncertain inputs and resources.

Findings

Demonstrates the effectiveness of the tool in providing a quantified assessment of the process as well as its ability to identify those critical areas which will yield a significant improvement in the outcome of the product development process.

Originality/value

The technique is a valuable tool to assess the robustness and sensitivity of the process to changes in the quality of inputs, controls and tools, and can be integrated into businesses processes and management systems, and used as a tool to support continuous business and manufacturing decisions at any point of time.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Ka Yin Kwok and V.M. Rao Tummala

Reviews and evaluates different quality tools that are commonly available in manufacturing and service industries and integrates them into an effective quality control and…

Abstract

Reviews and evaluates different quality tools that are commonly available in manufacturing and service industries and integrates them into an effective quality control and improvement system based on their characteristics and appropriateness when applying these tools. The study is based on the enhancement of the basic total control methodology (TCM) model which was originally developed and implemented by Motorola Semiconductors Hong Kong Ltd (MSHKL). During the implementation, several opportunities can be identified in terms of classification methods of quality tools, extent of quality tools covered, and interrelationships among the quality tools. Therefore, a study was carried out to enhance the basic model by integrating over 40 quality tools into a three‐tiered model in order to make it more comprehensive in terms of application from a practical point of view. Demonstrates the effectiveness achieved after the implementation of the TCM model.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Christos Fotopoulos and Evagelos Psomas

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of use of quality management tools and techniques as well as employees' training in ISO 9001:2000 certified companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of use of quality management tools and techniques as well as employees' training in ISO 9001:2000 certified companies.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in 370 Greek companies, using the questionnaire method. The selected companies have been implementing a quality management system in accordance with the ISO 9001:2000 standard. Independent Samples t‐tests and One‐Way ANOVA tests were used to identify significant differences between selected companies.

Findings

The level of quality tools and techniques used in the ISO 9001:2000 certified companies can be characterised as low. The majority of companies use the easiest to understand and implement quality tools. However, the more complex quality tools and techniques are barely used. As far as employees' training is concerned, it mostly addressed specialized issues, while training on quality tools and techniques was not highly performed.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on the quality manager's perceptions (subjective data) and it did not examine the reasons for not implementing and the difficulties encountered while implementing quality tools and techniques. These constitute research limitations but also future research orientations.

Practical implications

Given the increased rate of companies adopting a quality management system, continuous improvement through a Total Quality programme can be achieved through the implementation of quality tools and techniques.

Originality/value

This paper describes the implementation status of the quality tools and techniques in companies with a four‐year experience in ISO 9001:2000 standard.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Catherine Hagemeyer, John K. Gershenson and Dana M. Johnson

The complexity of problem solving requires use of quality tools to assist in the organization and analysis of information and data surrounding the concern. A proposed…

Abstract

Purpose

The complexity of problem solving requires use of quality tools to assist in the organization and analysis of information and data surrounding the concern. A proposed classification scheme for problem‐solving tools allows the user to identify the correct tool at the proper time in the problem‐solving process. This may assist the problem solver to efficiently and effectively work toward problem solution. The classification scheme, in the form of a matrix, identifies, organizes, and defines tools of the six sigma problem‐solving process as taught and implemented at a large manufacturing company.

Design/methodology/approach

Development of a problem‐solving matrix to enable more efficient and effective use of tools applied to a six sigma project in a large manufacturing company.

Findings

The application of the methodology to a case study in a large manufacturing company related to an Air Conditioning (A/C) No Fill concern. The exercise of applying the six sigma tools matrix to this project would have been improved if conducted at the beginning of the six sigma Belt training and start of the A/C No Fill project.

Research limitations/implications

Since, the matrix was not fully completed at the start of either the training or the project, the team was unable to begin using the developed matrix until midway through both. This posed some limitations in judging the efficiency and effectiveness of the matrix. Although it is believed that both were improved, the maximum benefit may not have been achieved because of timing in application. Future application of the matrix should commence at the beginning of the project to enable maximum results for more efficient and effective problem solving and identification of proposed solution.

Practical implications

Manufacturing and service organizations can improve their problem‐solving methodology by using the approach outlined in this paper. It will enable companies to better “match” the tools necessary to solve real‐life business problems.

Originality/value

Although this approach uses existing quality management and problem‐solving tools, its novel application in the development of a more thorough approach to problem solving, aided by the classification of problem‐solving tools may enable companies to more successfully and expeditiously reach proposed solutions.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Jordi Castello, Rudi De Castro and Frederic Marimon

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the use of quality management tools and techniques and their integration into the ISO 9001:2008 standard in a wind power (WP…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the use of quality management tools and techniques and their integration into the ISO 9001:2008 standard in a wind power (WP) sector supply chain (SC).

Design/methodology/approach

The research project was carried out in 119 WP sector SC companies (i.e. component suppliers, wind turbine assemblers and wind farm operation and maintenance services) using the questionnaire method. The companies selected employ quality management systems (QMSs) which conform to the ISO 9001:2008 standard.

Findings

The survey findings reveal that the degree to which quality tools and techniques are used in the WP companies can be characterised as “high”. The results show that internal audits, flowchart diagrams and cost of poor quality are the most-commonly applied tools and techniques, although they also indicate some areas for further improvement, for instance, when using advanced and complex quality techniques such as design of experiments, quality function deployment or business process management. In addition to this, the findings reveal that ISO 9001:2008 establishes a favourable environment for the use of quality tools and techniques.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on the perceptions of quality managers, quality engineers and company managers (subjective data) and did not examine the reasons for either not implementing and/or the difficulties encountered while implementing quality tools and techniques.

Practical implications

The specific findings indicate that employing quality tools and techniques is useful for managers, not only when implementing a QMS, but also when suggesting recommendations for improvement.

Originality/value

A change of developing a framework integrating the main QT&T procedures into the main ISO 9001 processes.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Majed Al‐Mashari, Mohamed Zairi and David Ginn

This paper presents the concepts and principles of quality function deployment (QFD) as they have been implemented by Ford company. The paper illustrates the essential…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the concepts and principles of quality function deployment (QFD) as they have been implemented by Ford company. The paper illustrates the essential linkages between external and internal customers to suppliers (i.e. “Voice‐Quality‐Satisfaction” Chains).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers some of the details of changes that are occurring to support the “Breakthrough in Quality”. One of the key elements of the Ford Motor Company engineering quality improvements program (EQIP) within Europe has been the linking of some seven‐quality tool techniques including QFD as the core link. For the purpose of improving QFD, it is both useful and rational to look at ways in which it can be linked to, or integrated with other quality tools. The Ford EQIP training process argues that QFD, within a customer focused engineering (CFE) process is a key tool in linking all other tools, through the QFD process itself.

Findings

The paper also looks at discussions on QFD linkages with other quality tools and processes. This sequence of QFD linkages to other single, or dual linked quality tools finishing with some engineering processes is particularly discussed. Among these are Pugh Concept Selection, Taguchi methods, experimentation, failure mode effects analysis (FMEA), value management, quality benchmark deployment (QBD) and benchmarking, process management, statistical process control (SPC), team oriented problem solving – eight disciplines (TOPS 8D), and systems engineering.

Research limitations/implications

Although the manifestation of the Ford customer satisfaction process has been reviewed as the CFE QFD process within Ford of Europe, its adoption and awareness is still limited. As a result of this, it is critical to review the research topic of customer satisfaction with a focus on how Ford Motor Company as a whole approaches this key goal through the use of various marketing, sales and marketing research office (MRO) initiatives.

Practical implications

It discusses the various arguments and proposals that link together the end user customers voice to the internal customer‐supplier chains that act on the customer input and feedback to improve product quality and ultimately deliver higher end user satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper concludes with a discussion of the use of QFD with other quality tools and processes, the role of QFD within total quality management (TQM) processes, and team working.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 105 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

K.C. Chan

The ideas expressed in this work are based on those put intopractice at the Okuma Corporation of Japan, one of the world′s leadingmachine tool manufacturers. In common…

Abstract

The ideas expressed in this work are based on those put into practice at the Okuma Corporation of Japan, one of the world′s leading machine tool manufacturers. In common with many other large organizations, Okuma Corporation has to meet the new challenges posed by globalization, keener domestic and international competition, shorter business cycles and an increasingly volatile environment. Intelligent corporate strategy (ICS), as practised at Okuma, is a unified theory of strategic corporate management based on five levels of win‐win relationships for profit/market share, namely: ,1. Loyalty from customers (value for money) – right focus., 2. Commitment from workers (meeting hierarchy of needs) – right attitude., 3. Co‐operation from suppliers (expanding and reliable business) – right connections., 4. Co‐operation from distributors (expanding and reliable business) – right channels., 5. Respect from competitors (setting standards for business excellence) – right strategies. The aim is to create values for all stakeholders. This holistic people‐oriented approach recognizes that, although the world is increasingly driven by high technology, it continues to be influenced and managed by people (customers, workers, suppliers, distributors, competitors). The philosophical core of ICS is action learning and teamwork based on principle‐centred relationships of sincerity, trust and integrity. In the real world, these are the roots of success in relationships and in the bottom‐line results of business. ICS is, in essence, relationship management for synergy. It is based on the premiss that domestic and international commerce is a positive sum game: in the long run everyone wins. Finally, ICS is a paradigm for manufacturing companies coping with change and uncertainty in their search for profit/market share. Time‐honoured values give definition to corporate character; circumstances change, values remain. Poor business operations generally result from human frailty. ICS is predicated on the belief that the quality of human relationships determines the bottom‐line results. ICS attempts to make manifest and explicit the intangible psychological factors for value‐added partnerships. ICS is a dynamic, living, and heuristic‐learning model. There is intelligence in the corporate strategy because it applies commonsense, wisdom, creative systems thinking and synergy to ensure longevity in its corporate life for sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 93 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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