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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

K.B. Sridevi

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of

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Abstract

Purpose

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management education is the really challenging part, and this is where the management educational institutions build their uniqueness. The present management education needs a paradigm shift in order to fulfill the growing futuristic demands of the industry. The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies. The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India to analyze the perception of the management faculty and management students toward filling the quality gaps for a futuristic management education. The study has included 125 management faculties and 1200 management students through simple random sampling, and the data are collected through survey method.

Findings

The independent “t” test has been applied. The management faculties exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as research gaps, online platforms and industry and institution linkages since the mean scores are 4.22, 4.20 and 4.14 respectively. The management students exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as online platforms, updated pedagogies and soft skills development since the respective mean scores are 3.87, 3.85 and 3.82.

Research limitations/implications

The research area chosen for the study is reflecting the scenario of management education in developing countries such as India. The scenario may differ to developed countries.

Practical implications

When the quality of the management education is enriched, it will create global management professionals who will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments.

Social implications

The present study is enriching the existing literature review, by comparing the perception of both the counterparts, the management faculty and students, about the teaching and learning process. Thus, it can be concluded that the outcome of this study is relevant for the management educational institutions, and the need of the hour for the management education is definitely to fill the quality gaps, and all the management educational institutions have to be prepared enough to overcome the gaps with the support of their well-planned strategies. The futuristic demands are ever growing, even then the gap between the present and future expectations of the industry need to be well considered and bridged. As a result of the paradigm shift, the quality of the management education will be enriched, and it will create global management professionals. As a result of this quality-conscious education, a reputed brand image and set of loyal customers may also be developed (Akareem and Hossain, 2016). The learners of quality management education will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments. Further research is needed to measure the post impact of filling the quality gaps in the arena of management education.

Originality/value

The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Raine Isaksson, Jonas Hansson and Rickard Garvare

The application of a process view, as complement to the traditional functional division, is often a way to highlight organisational improvement potential. This paper…

Abstract

The application of a process view, as complement to the traditional functional division, is often a way to highlight organisational improvement potential. This paper examines the process of providing university level education in quality management, using Sweden as an example. The purpose is to assess the performance of university education as part of the supply chain of providing quality management to a society. This has been done by studying the actual offering compared to a notional benchmark of best performance. Preliminary results indicate that there could be a significant improvement potential in both providing more education of the right type and in the right way. A lot of similar basic courses are given but with varying names, possibly reflecting difficulties in defining the area of quality management and its constituents. An important reason for the detected improvement potential seems to be the lack of ownership of the studied supply chain of providing university level quality education to the Swedish society.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

R. Jagadeesh

The increasing demand for postgraduate education in management in India has resulted in a steep rise in the number of institutes offering such education. However, the…

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2080

Abstract

The increasing demand for postgraduate education in management in India has resulted in a steep rise in the number of institutes offering such education. However, the quality of education offered in many institutes is seriously being debated by students and prospective employers. The efforts to improve quality appear minimal, resulting in little or no improvement in quality. Provides a summary of status of quality in management education and critically analyses the issue of quality with the backdrop of problems, constraints, and conflicts. Further, the paper describes the structure and pattern of post‐graduate management education as offered in India, along with a description of regulatory agencies existing in the country to monitor the standards of management education. Towards the end, suggests appropriate solutions with several alternatives, to improve quality, discussing also their feasibility. The general objective is to provide help to develop strategies for improving quality of postgraduate education in management.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

G. Srikanthan and John Dalrymple

Suggests the quality in higher education (HE) debate is currently narrowly focussed, essentially around adapting industrial quality systems. Traditionally, the notion of

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5556

Abstract

Suggests the quality in higher education (HE) debate is currently narrowly focussed, essentially around adapting industrial quality systems. Traditionally, the notion of academic freedom was seen as the requirement of excellence in education. In more recent times (pre 1990) measures of quality control were imposed on HE, but their adoption was superficial compared to industry. The post 1990 period saw the need for a considerable increase in the quality systems activity in HE, in view of the dynamism in the sector. The adoption of quality management (QM) was preferred, because of its extensive practice in industry. Presently, its practice in HE is deteriorating into managerialism in institutions, because of lack of development of a shared vision and lack of a match between QM techniques and educational processes. Proposes a new approach to quality systems in HE. QM can still be the broad management methodology but should be adapted to educational processes and be made to preserve the traditional values of academic freedom and collegial modes of operation.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Swati Yeravdekar and Abhishek Behl

Management education has assumed phenomenal prominence in India in recent years, with branding being a prime factor used as a yardstick, rather a benchmark or point of

Abstract

Purpose

Management education has assumed phenomenal prominence in India in recent years, with branding being a prime factor used as a yardstick, rather a benchmark or point of reference, for one institution having an edge over the other. The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors leading to branding of management education in India. It proposes two frameworks using Total Interpretive Structural Model (TISM) for public and private sector management colleges. For this purpose, variables are extracted using systematic literature review, which play a crucial role in changing the dynamics of college rankings. The inquiry distinctly examines the nature of relationship between them for public and private colleges offering higher education. The study further proposes strategies for improvement of rankings by discussing the hierarchy and interrelationship among the enablers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses Interpretive Structural Model (ISM) to ascertain the linkages between the variables, and employs TISM to validate the reasons of association. The model was fabricated by consulting the experts from various spheres closely allied to branding and higher education, including the private agencies and decision makers in the selected colleges. The variables were furthermore structured for classification using Matrice d’Impacts Croises-Multiplication Appliqué an Classment Analysis.

Findings

It was observed that the variables behave differently when studied from the perspective of private sector colleges and public sector colleges; the former have seven levels of arrangement while it is only four for the latter. Quality of Faculty and Research were the key areas of concern for private sector colleges while infrastructure featured as a focal point for those in public sector. It was also evident that the placement of variables and their flow were different. Rankings should thus be premeditated differently for both the sectors and different weights should be assigned to rank the colleges.

Research limitations/implications

The study is confined to branding of management education institutes in India, without considering other important disciplines for generalizing the framework. It is based on literature review followed by ISM, while other approaches such as ethnographic research methods and appreciative inquiry could have been possible alternatives as well.

Practical implications

The paper helps in developing different frameworks for private and public sector institutes, which would assist them to have a homogenous completion within their respective sectors. The study can be used to measure the performance of colleges on various parameters and gives them linking variables to enhance their productivity.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the need for developing a different barometer to measure the performance of private sector and public sector colleges offering higher education.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Ritu Narang

Keeping in mind the urgent need to deliver quality education in higher education institutes, the current paper seeks to measure the quality perception of management

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1966

Abstract

Purpose

Keeping in mind the urgent need to deliver quality education in higher education institutes, the current paper seeks to measure the quality perception of management students in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an exploratory study a modified version of SERVQUAL was employed as the research instrument. Data were collected from young students between the ages of 21‐25 years.

Findings

The research instrument, EduQUAL, comprising 28 items tested well for both reliability and validity. Five dimensions of the scale, namely learning outcomes, responsiveness, physical facilities, personality development and academics, were identified. The results obtained pointed at the negative quality gaps in all the five dimensions of EduQUAL. The highest negative gap was visible in the physical facilities dimension and lowest negative score in case of academics dimension. There were significant differences between perceptions and expectations of students with respect to all the five dimensions of the scale (p<0.001).

Research limitations/implications

The study was confined to three public educational institutes so the generalizations for the entire nation have to be used cautiously. Therefore, the researchers are encouraged to extend this research to private and foreign universities as well.

Practical implications

The current study provides valuable insights into the quality of higher education perceived by students in India.

Originality/value

The study points out the seriousness required of the policy makers in ensuring the quality of higher education rather than being concerned with only quantitative increase of higher education institutes. It seeks to draw the attention of the administration towards areas of performance where improvements are required or more resources need to be diverted.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ritika Mahajan, Rajat Agrawal, Vinay Sharma and Vinay Nangia

The purpose and value of management education was always under the critics’ scanner but the proliferation of institutes impelled a serious debate on its quality. The…

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1790

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose and value of management education was always under the critics’ scanner but the proliferation of institutes impelled a serious debate on its quality. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors affecting quality of management education in India and explains their nature, significance and mutual influences using interpretive structural modelling (ISM).

Design/methodology/approach

The factors were listed through literature review. They were then validated by empirical research conducted through questionnaires administered electronically and personally to 220 master of business administration students and alumni. On 13 such factors finalised, a qualitative and interpretive tool, ISM was applied.

Findings

Leadership emerged as the most important factor followed by organisational structure and practices. Interrelations otherwise not easily observable established their prominence. An important fact that evolved is that almost all the factors have strong interdependence and have to be seen in coherence when analysing their impact on students.

Originality/value

The literature until now has been highlighting the factors and their association with management education largely in isolation. This paper contributes to the existing literature by proposing a framework of the interrelationships of the factors which have a role in improving the quality of management education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-808-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Sanjeev Verma and Ram Komal Prasad

The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically validated scale to measure the students’ perception of service quality in management education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically validated scale to measure the students’ perception of service quality in management education.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a three-stage systematic procedure of scale development has been adopted. Initially, extant literature review delineated the construct. Exploratory study techniques like focus group study and expert opinion helped in purifying the scale. In the second stage, principal component analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization (exploratory factor analysis) was used to refine the scale. Finally, multi-trait-multimethod matrix analysis was done to test the reliability and validity of the scale.

Findings

A 25-item multi-dimensional construct with six factors (academic aspect, professional assurance, behavioral responses and supports, industry institute interaction, non-academic aspects and physical support) was derived scientifically for measuring service quality in management education. Psychometrically, the scale exhibits internal consistency and remains consistent across the samples. The scale passes the requisite reliability and validity tests (construct, convergent, discriminant, nomological, predictive) with all values within limits.

Practical implications

Scientific and structured multi-dimensional construct for service quality in management education will help academicians, administrators and regulators in designing a process-oriented system for enhanced student satisfaction and performance.

Originality/value

This study is an incremental attempt to develop an empirically validated scale for measuring the service quality level and resultant satisfaction in management education.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Cláudia S. Sarrico and Margarida M. Pinheiro

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate on the quality and accreditation of management education by examining the fit between the characteristics of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate on the quality and accreditation of management education by examining the fit between the characteristics of current management academics in Portugal and recognised accreditation standards. For purposes of comparison, the authors use both general Portuguese teaching accreditation standards and specific international standards for management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyse indicators of staff career positioning, tenure status, full time vs part-time, age, degree qualifications, field of training, level of academic inbreeding, internationalisation, research activity, professional activity, and the number of hours taught per week. The authors also examine the relationship between them, in light of accreditation standards, for all academic staff teaching in management degrees submitted for compulsory accreditation by the Portuguese accreditation agency.

Findings

The reality found in this study shows gaps between the actual attributes of management academics and what can be considered appropriate attributes, according to the general consensus found in the literature and which is duly mirrored in common “qualified faculties” accreditation standards by Portuguese and international standards (AACSB, AMBA and EQUIS).

Research limitations/implications

The findings relate to the Portuguese situation and the analysis developed should be extended to other contexts. Also, while the data, which were collected through a census, has a wide national scope, it only covers one academic year.

Practical implications

This work has policy setting implications for degree accreditation and for developing capacity during the transitional periods when universities implement the mandatory minimum standards. It can also help universities to benchmark themselves against their peers as a diagnostic tool for elaborating improvement plans.

Social implications

The massification of higher education has led to legitimate concerns about the quality of the services provided, and consequently accreditation procedures were devised to restore trust. However, policy makers must be aware of the impacts of their actions, namely the effects of degree accreditation, as their goals need to be achieved with the minimum negative impact on academic work.

Originality/value

The authors work sheds light on the characteristics of those who teach management and how they align with the current accreditation policies that affect academia globally and, in the process, presents empirical evidence from Portugal, which is at a relatively early stage in the accreditation process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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