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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Tang Xiaofen

Shanghai is a Chinese city with a history of more than 700 years, which has played a very important role over 30 years of rapid economic growth in China. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Shanghai is a Chinese city with a history of more than 700 years, which has played a very important role over 30 years of rapid economic growth in China. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality management maturity system and schemes of Shanghai enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation on quality management maturity of Shanghai enterprises was conducted by Shanghai Association for Quality (SAQ), to study the environmental impact of increasing globalization of industries.

Findings

SAQ made a systematic investigation and evaluation on the maturity of enterprise product, services and overall management quality, to comprehensively understand and assess the current status and levels of Shanghai enterprise quality management and to obtain important information for preparing a strategy for the Shanghai enterprise quality development plan and countermeasures to stay competitive in the new era.

Originality/value

The paper shows that, in order to further improve market competitiveness and capability of sustainable operation and growth, Shanghai enterprises must enhance their overall quality management level guided by the performance excellence criterion, implementing and putting forward mega efforts on enterprises taking primary responsibility for striving to promote CSR based on “operation with integrity and responsibility”, investing in “soft skills strength development” and utilizing quality improvement tools and techniques to promote the overall quality management level to a new high in the next decade.

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Christopher J. Willis and Jeffrey H. Rankin

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an alternative approach of measuring construction industry performance using maturity modeling. The focus is on introducing a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an alternative approach of measuring construction industry performance using maturity modeling. The focus is on introducing a newly developed maturity model referred to as the construction industry macro maturity model (CIM3) and highlighting its use by assessing the maturity of the construction industry of the Province of New Brunswick, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Current methods of construction industry performance measurement such as labor productivity and competitiveness are briefly reviewed, highlighting their weaknesses. The theoretical underpinnings of the CIM3 are discussed and the implementation of the CIM3 to measure the cost and quality management maturity of the New Brunswick construction industry is presented.

Findings

An assessment of the construction industry's maturity using the CIM3 provides a leading indication of performance. This is based on the industry being structured according to key practices areas that contain key practices. The industry's key practices are linked to objectives that lead to the achievement of performance goals. The maturity of the construction industry with respect to its key practices is a function of the relative importance of the key practices and the capabilities of the industry in implementing the key practices. Based on this, the implementation of the CIM3 in New Brunswick found that the NB construction industry is more mature in cost management than in quality management.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing body of knowledge on industry performance measurement, and more particularly, construction industry performance measurement. The concept of maturity modeling applied here promotes and demonstrates the use of leading indicators of performance, as recommended in most performance measurement literature.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Odysseas Moschidis, Evrikleia Chatzipetrou and George Tsiotras

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sophistication of a quality costing system depends on the quality management maturity (QMM) level in Food and Beverage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sophistication of a quality costing system depends on the quality management maturity (QMM) level in Food and Beverage (F&B) enterprises. Since no previous research has taken place in this area, the paper aims at analyzing the relationships between quality costing and the specific variables that define the various maturity stages.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was used to survey 457 F&B companies. This produced 104 usable responses (23 percent response rate). Multidimensional correspondence analysis (MCA) with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were used to detect and represent underlying structures in the categorical data set and to detect possible clusters between variables.

Findings

The more mature a company’s QMM, the more emphasis they placed on appraisal quality costs and effective use of quality costs information. Prevention costs have no statistically significant connection with the level of maturity. A generalized “expensive” use of quality costing, with no focus on problematic areas and possible solutions, does not always lead to the resolution of problems.

Research limitations/implications

A complicated – and some think unfair – tax system, combined with limited cash liquidity constitutes an unstable environment for Greek companies, in which they have to survive and develop. This environment does not support quality costing, thus resulting in limited interest by company management in participating in the authors’ research. Furthermore, the Greek Uniform Chart of Accounts and the Greek Accounting Standards do not include specific quality-related accounts, making it difficult for companies to measure quality costs and for researchers to investigate the quality costing field.

Originality/value

It is the first time that QMM levels of Greek F&B companies have been reported. The research explores the characteristics that a quality costing system of Greek F&B organizations develop at the various maturity levels. The analysis uses an exploratory method – MCA – which can highlight intense correspondences of characteristics and clusters, which cannot be predicted in advance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Scott A. Dellana and John F. Kros

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences among industry classes and supply chain positions in order to gain insight into quality management program maturity

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine differences among industry classes and supply chain positions in order to gain insight into quality management program maturity across industries and within supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for comparison in this study comes from an e-mail survey of professionals across the USA, employed primarily in sourcing or logistics (i.e. Institute for Supply Management (ISM) and Council for Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP)).

Findings

This study found that quality maturity varies by industry class. While prior studies have found differences by industry class, they have been limited to at most three classes, while this study examined 17 classes. This study also examines quality maturity by supply chain position, with the finding that quality maturity differed by supply chain position depending on how position is defined. Questions are raised regarding the proper characterization of supply chain position.

Research limitations/implications

The sample group represents members in only two professional groups, ISM and CSCMP. Not all industry groups or supply chain positions were well-represented due to some small sub-group sizes.

Practical implications

Quality program maturity is generally not uniform and there are potentially many opportunities for substantial improvement across various sectors by specific industry. Partnering with suppliers is a recommended approach for sectors lagging in quality maturity.

Originality/value

This research extends the examination of quality management practice in the supply chain by studying a large number of industry classes and supply chain positions and assesses differences in quality maturity across these classes and positions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Gwo Yang Tsai, Tsuang Kuo and Li-Chen Lin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the satisfaction level of government employees toward the e-government information platform system in Taiwan to better understand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the satisfaction level of government employees toward the e-government information platform system in Taiwan to better understand the effectiveness of such systems. Furthermore, this paper aimed to investigate the moderating effects of management maturity on quality management and user satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the questionnaire via a pretest, and then 174 formal questionnaires were obtained from people who had used the focal information platform system.

Findings

The results show that management maturity has a high, positive moderating effect on service quality (SQ), a medium moderating effect on system quality (SysQ), and a low, negative moderating effect on information quality (IQ).

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this study is that the survey was conducted at one public agency in Taiwan. Therefore, a suggestion for further research is to focus on both public and private corporations, as well as government agencies.

Practical implications

This study built a moderating model for 3Q and management maturity, in order to provide quality management directions, especially with regard to information management, system establishment, and service management.

Originality/value

Management maturity is a vital, albeit long neglected, determinant for the success of the adoption of e-government information systems (ISs). Such ISs serve only as a tool, and it is those who operate the systems that put their functions into full play. Given this, management maturity is likely to be the key to the successful operation of ISs.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Ângela Regina Souza Santos, Renata Maciel de Melo, Thárcylla Rebecca Negreiros Clemente and Simone Machado Santos

A model to evaluate the maturity of the integration of three management systems in food industries, under the aspects of environment, quality and food safety is proposed.

Abstract

Purpose

A model to evaluate the maturity of the integration of three management systems in food industries, under the aspects of environment, quality and food safety is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is composed of maturity levels, allowing the understanding of the integration of the systems mentioned and their stage of evolution. The work was based on a bibliographic review of the topics: ISO standards, Integrated Management Systems (IMS) and already existing methods for maturity assessment. The referred model is composed of elements related to (1) audit dynamics, (2) changes in behavior, (3) the organizational structure, (4) the participation of senior management and (5) the interface with the cycle of continuous improvement.

Findings

The model is easily applicable and composed of five maturity levels, allowing the understanding of the stage of system evolution: (1) absence of maturity, (2) introductory level, (3) intermediate level, (4) toward excellence and (5) excellence.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the model may help managers in the development of actions for the improvement of their integrated management (drivers for IMS) aiming at process control, the focus on the client and the integration of people and processes. Based on the drivers, the managers will be able to make plans characterized by orientations, techniques and tools applied in the several organizational processes. Using the proposed model, managers can enhance the desired results with efficiency and effectiveness.

Originality/value

The existing literature presents limited results on the integration of certified systems for the analysis of the maturity stages in manufacturing industries. Therefore, this study extends results from other studies on IMS, associating them to an organizational maturity analysis in food industries, resulting in a proposal of maturity model. This study also proposes the integration of ISO 14001, ISO 9001 and ISO 22000 to indicate the maturity stage of manufacturing industries in the food sector, supporting the strategic management process of organizations of any size. The model adopts several aspects of management and control to provide a holistic view on the integrated management of organizations. Finally, the proposed model considers several aspects of management and control for the food industries in the developing countries, providing a holistic view of integrated management.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Halima Egberongbe, Barbara Sen and Peter Willett

Organizations constantly evaluate their activities to ensure that they are attaining their management goals. Maturity assessment enables organizations to examine their…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations constantly evaluate their activities to ensure that they are attaining their management goals. Maturity assessment enables organizations to examine their capabilities, support innovation and evaluate development. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the maturity statuses of a selection of Nigerian university libraries in a study to investigate their quality management (QM) approaches. The study provides recommendations for means to attain the required statuses in academic library development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a multisite case study in which interviews were conducted with 15 university librarians (or their representatives) and ten focus groups were conducted with non-management library staff. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using an aspect of framework analysis – charting, while a maturity model from the field of project management (Prince 2 Maturity Model, P2MM) was used to assess maturity in QM of the libraries.

Findings

The results of the maturity assessment indicate a basic knowledge of the concept of QM implementation among the libraries. The scores obtained on the P2MM capability scale placed the libraries studied mainly on Level 1 (awareness level) of the model.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates that the culture of QM in academic libraries in Nigeria is at a low level with considerable potential for development. It is suggested that future adoption of quality maturity models to assess performance and organizational effectiveness would aid improvements for value-added services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to attempt the assessment of quality maturity levels in Nigerian academic libraries for identification of the organization’s positioning in QM and strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Scott Dellana and John Kros

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of ISO 9001 certification and diffusion in the USA in relation to organizational supply chain position, quality maturity

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of ISO 9001 certification and diffusion in the USA in relation to organizational supply chain position, quality maturity, and supplier quality maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for comparison in this study comes from an e-mail survey questionnaire of supply chain professionals across the USA. A pilot survey was initially e-mailed to 100 supply chain professionals and preliminary data from 27 respondents were used to revise the questionnaire. Respondents to the revised questionnaire returned 565 e-mailed questionnaires out of 2,924 active e-mail addresses.

Findings

The results suggest that companies adopting ISO 9001 are likely doing so as part of an overall quality management program more so than from direct market pressure. It appears that ISO 9001 certification rates differ by organizational position in the supply chain. ISO 9001 certified organizations are more likely to have quality programs of greater maturity and suppliers with greater quality maturity than organizations that are not ISO 9001 certified. Certified organizations are also more likely to use suppliers that are ISO 9001 capable or certified than non-ISO 9001 organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Not all industry groups or supply chain positions were well-represented due to some small sub-group sizes.

Practical implications

The study of ISO 9001 certification in US organizations has been lacking in the literature. Given the weak adoption rate of ISO 9001 in the USA, this study helps characterize ISO 9001 certification from a supply chain perspective and explores possible reasons for low certification rates.

Originality/value

This research extends the knowledge of quality management in the supply chain by studying ISO 9001 certification in relation to supply chain position and differences in quality maturity between certified and non-certified organizations in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Marcelo Albuquerque Oliveira and Isabel Lopes

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new maturity model to identify the current state of maintenance area of organizations and drives actions to increase efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new maturity model to identify the current state of maintenance area of organizations and drives actions to increase efficiency and effectiveness toward the concept known as world-class.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed based on an extensive literature review on maintenance management and maturity assessment, which allowed identifying the relevant factors in maintenance management and the world-class behaviors for each factor. The progressive maturity levels for each of the identified ten factors form the model. To test its effectiveness, it was applied to the maintenance area of three companies.

Findings

The model application showed that, in addition to being a self-assessment tool, it provides knowledge, to those who use it, on behaviors or practices that enable world-class results. For each factor, potential gaps and the desired state were defined focusing on behaviors rather than on indicators values or adopted methodologies, which facilitates the identification of improvement actions that lead to better performance.

Research limitations/implications

Through its use, maturity levels can be identified for all considered maintenance management factors, however, the overall maturity of the maintenance area is not determined. Although this overall evaluation can be done assigning a weight to each factor, it was not considered an added value for the set purpose.

Originality/value

The proposed maturity model contributes to the understanding of the maintenance management process and how to stand out nowadays in an area that has an increasingly important impact on productivity and quality.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Åsa Rönnbäck and Henrik Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the maturity of quality management and digital innovation in an organisation. Furthermore, the purpose is to analyse the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the maturity of quality management and digital innovation in an organisation. Furthermore, the purpose is to analyse the relationship between and learning opportunities of the two concepts based on that maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative case study was carried out by conducting in‐depth interviews with both quality management and IT professionals, complemented with a document study.

Findings

The findings of this research show the maturity of quality management and digital innovation in an organization using a set of principles. The analysis shows that, on an overall level, the majority of the principles studied concerning quality management and digital innovation are categorized as “uncommitted” or “initiators”. The study shows that there is an interrelationship between quality management and digital innovation and they are dependent on each other.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study and focuses on one context where the interrelationship between quality management and digital innovation is studied.

Practical implications

The results can provide insights on the importance of working cross‐functionally when developing the organisation. The maturity of quality management in an organisation can either inhibit or facilitate digital innovation, and similarly, digital innovation can improve or deteriorate service quality for both internal and external customers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the service quality literature by empirically investigating the maturity of quality management and digital innovation, and discussing how they can relate and what they can learn from each other.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000