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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

K.B. Sridevi

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of…

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802

Abstract

Purpose

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management education is the really challenging part, and this is where the management educational institutions build their uniqueness. The present management education needs a paradigm shift in order to fulfill the growing futuristic demands of the industry. The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies. The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India to analyze the perception of the management faculty and management students toward filling the quality gaps for a futuristic management education. The study has included 125 management faculties and 1200 management students through simple random sampling, and the data are collected through survey method.

Findings

The independent “t” test has been applied. The management faculties exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as research gaps, online platforms and industry and institution linkages since the mean scores are 4.22, 4.20 and 4.14 respectively. The management students exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as online platforms, updated pedagogies and soft skills development since the respective mean scores are 3.87, 3.85 and 3.82.

Research limitations/implications

The research area chosen for the study is reflecting the scenario of management education in developing countries such as India. The scenario may differ to developed countries.

Practical implications

When the quality of the management education is enriched, it will create global management professionals who will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments.

Social implications

The present study is enriching the existing literature review, by comparing the perception of both the counterparts, the management faculty and students, about the teaching and learning process. Thus, it can be concluded that the outcome of this study is relevant for the management educational institutions, and the need of the hour for the management education is definitely to fill the quality gaps, and all the management educational institutions have to be prepared enough to overcome the gaps with the support of their well-planned strategies. The futuristic demands are ever growing, even then the gap between the present and future expectations of the industry need to be well considered and bridged. As a result of the paradigm shift, the quality of the management education will be enriched, and it will create global management professionals. As a result of this quality-conscious education, a reputed brand image and set of loyal customers may also be developed (Akareem and Hossain, 2016). The learners of quality management education will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments. Further research is needed to measure the post impact of filling the quality gaps in the arena of management education.

Originality/value

The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Wai Ming Tam and Yin Cheong Cheng

Believes that an urgent need for in‐depth understanding of the relationship of staff development to education quality exists in current educational reforms, policy making…

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3188

Abstract

Believes that an urgent need for in‐depth understanding of the relationship of staff development to education quality exists in current educational reforms, policy making, and teacher education. Based on the existing knowledge of education quality, quality management and effective schools, aims to propose a framework to show how staff development can be designed and managed to contribute to the assurance and enhancement of school education quality from the perspective of seven multimodels of school education quality. Different models emphasize different aspects of school education quality and propose different strategies to enhance it. For ensuring long‐term school education quality in a changing educational environment, staff development can be organized and managed according to the major concerns of multimodels. Proposes some practical considerations for designing and implementing school‐based staff development.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Kim Watty

To provide a view of quality in accounting education from the perspective of a critical stakeholder group – academic accountants. The identification of this view adds to…

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5127

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a view of quality in accounting education from the perspective of a critical stakeholder group – academic accountants. The identification of this view adds to the growing discussions around quality, and how it is assured in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a framework for defining quality in higher education to an accounting context, a postal survey questionnaire was sent to academic accountants at 39 Australian universities to gather data about their views of quality in accounting education.

Findings

Academic accountants view quality, as currently defined and promoted in their immediate working environment, differently to their views about how quality should be defined and promoted. As a consequence, quality assurance and improvement systems may be currently designed to assure quality that is promoted in accounting education, rather than quality that ought to be promoted.

Research limitations/implications

Using a postal survey to gather data on the complex issue of “quality” might not always provide the richness of data that may be collected during face‐to‐face survey interviews.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide valuable input into the discussion around the design of quality assurance and improvement systems in higher education generally, and for accounting education specifically.

Originality/value

In the absence of any previous empirical research that has sought to identify these perceptions, the findings fill the gap in the literature by clearly identifying the views of quality in accounting education from a key stakeholder group – academic accountants.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Alison Felce

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management, organisation, inspection and funding have little in common with those familiar to higher education. Higher level and degree apprenticeships have brought together different cultures and methods of designing, delivering and assessing knowledge, skills and behaviours, funding learners and learning providers, data reporting, quality management and its review or inspection. The purpose of this paper is to establish the primary concerns about managing quality in degree apprenticeships, the challenges the variances bring, how the challenges are being resolved and future work that may be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of a range of guidance and organisations involved in managing the quality of higher education in apprenticeships was undertaken. The primary focus is on the advice and guidance provided through the Quality Code and associated documentation, which are key to managing and assuring standards and quality in UK higher education. In addition, requirements and guidance provided through other bodies is considered along with the cross-sector groups charged with developing quality assurance processes for apprenticeships at all levels.

Findings

The paper shows a range of detailed guidance available to those entering the higher and degree apprenticeships arena and how the organisations involved in quality assurance of apprenticeships are working together to remove or mitigate concerns to ensure that quality is embedded and successfully managed.

Originality/value

Designing and delivering higher level and degree apprenticeships is a relatively new addition to UK higher education providers. There are long established practices to assure the quality and standards of UK higher education wherever and, however, it is delivered, in the UK, overseas and through online models. Apprenticeships across the UK have changed significantly over recent years, and new models, organisations and methods of working and funding have been introduced. This paper brings together key activity by the Quality Assurance Agency and other stakeholders to show how standards and quality can be managed and assured.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Naidi Faisal, Nurhafni, Putri Murdiana and Zulhilmi

Purpose – This research analyzes and describes the implementation of the North Aceh Regency education budget policy for improving the quality of education in relationship…

Abstract

Purpose – This research analyzes and describes the implementation of the North Aceh Regency education budget policy for improving the quality of education in relationship to the impact of the special autonomy budget.

Design/Methodology/Approach – This research uses qualitative research, descriptive-qualitative analysis methods, and qualitative explorative methods.

Findings – The results show that the implementation of the special autonomy education budget policy of North Aceh Regency to improve the education quality has not run optimally. The main obstacle is the inadequate human resource issue, including the leadership problems of regional heads who should prioritize the development. Based on field data of the actors involved in the formulation of the education quality improvement program in Aceh Utara District, especially the legislative branch (namely BAPPEDA), the education office and members of the Aceh legislative team, the post-conflict Aceh representation of the legislature at the provincial level, the DPRA and DPRK at the district level / in the field of political will produced. The resulting program does not focus on the pattern of improving the quality of education, the policy is more rhetorical, and the program implementation is often adapted to the wishes of political actors.

Research Limitations/Implications – Given the fundamental differences in the root causes of primary and secondary education in Aceh, further research is needed to determine whether similar results will be obtained in other parts of Aceh.

Originality/Value – Identifies factors that lead to the low quality of educators and the unequal distribution of teachers in the Aceh Regency.

Paper Type – Research paper

Details

Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Yusuf Sayed

Quality has always been a central concern in education. Theexistent debate of educational quality has, however, shifted. Thecurrent discourse about educational quality is…

Abstract

Quality has always been a central concern in education. The existent debate of educational quality has, however, shifted. The current discourse about educational quality is replete with slogans like “standards”, “quality control”, “total quality management”, “consumer rights” and “appraisal”. Furthermore, the present debate about educational quality leaves many of the assumptions that underpin the utilization of the concept, quality, unexamined. In addition, recent discussions about educational quality presume, implicitly or explicitly, certain understandings of the practice of education. More importantly, the current discourse of educational quality is largely technicist. Argues that the current debate concerning educational quality is underpinned by technicist assumptions with respect to the practice of education. Moreover, further argues that the prevalent discourse of educational quality suppresses the argument regarding educational equality.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

David Blake

As a new framework for quality assurance in teacher education emerges,internal and external constituencies with an interest in teachereducation quality are making…

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2472

Abstract

As a new framework for quality assurance in teacher education emerges, internal and external constituencies with an interest in teacher education quality are making burdensome demands on the sector. The constituencies include OFSTED, Government agencies concerned with accreditation and funding, the HE institutions, the teaching profession and student teachers. The result is a series of potentially conflicting pressures and a heavy cycle of inspection and report writing. There is a danger that tutors involved in the process will become sceptical about it, falling back on compliant responses in order to satisfy demands at a surface level. Examines quality assurance in teacher education, reports the way in which one group of teacher education tutors conceptualizes the idea of quality in practice and identifies those characteristics of a quality assurance system which should retain the confidence of staff.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2022

Nitin Gupta, Prem Vrat and Ravindra Ojha

The education sector acts as an input for every other sector and contributes around 7% to the service industry; hence, it is important to identify, measure and analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

The education sector acts as an input for every other sector and contributes around 7% to the service industry; hence, it is important to identify, measure and analyze the drivers that impact the delivered service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used different approaches to identify measure and analyze the drivers that impact the service quality. In addition to a thorough literature review, qualitative tools like brainstorming, the focused group technique, and the survey technique have been used. Decision-making tools like the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), and a quantitative tool, one-sample t-test, with the help of MINITAB software, were used to analyze the inputs received from 179 experts. By using the stated approach, the planned research outcomes have been achieved.

Findings

Quality of teachers, quality of students, quality of policies, and quality of facilities have been identified as the key drivers that impact quality of education. The paper highlights that the people quality drivers play a significantly important role in the quality of education when compared to the quality of non-people drivers. From the statistical analysis of the hypotheses, it was inferred that the People quality consisting of the quality of a teacher and the quality of students are the two prominent drivers to the Quality of education. This paper demonstrates the importance of the quality of a teacher and its significance to the quality of education. The recommendations made might be considered for the implementation, which can improve the quality of education in the country.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is focused on the data collected from the experts in the top-ranked management institutes only. The data from the experts from undergraduate institutions and other management institutes could have added more value.

Practical implications

In the paper, the drivers were identified and further analyzed to suggest that teacher quality is a dominant driver of education quality. The findings also suggest that there should be a high focus on having a great quality teacher as compared to the facilities. The weights identified will enable the researcher to arrive at the overall quality scores of any Institute. As a part of the process, the user just needs to collect the ratings from the end customers (the parents of the students) against each driver, and the institute level scores can be derived. These scores can then be used by the Institute's management to analyze the results and improve upon the weak areas to improve the delivered service quality in the education sector.

Originality/value

A holistic approach to exploring major drivers that impact the quality of education is a new approach. Moreover, using different tools like AHP, hypothesis testing, t-test, using the coefficient of variation in a single paper has not been attempted before. The revalidations of accepted hypotheses with respondents is also a new approach.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Vangelis Tsiligiris, Anita Kéri and Jeremy Eng-Tuck Cheah

This study aims to explore the influence of the individual student profile of Hofstede’s Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Collectiveness and Long-Term Orientation on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the influence of the individual student profile of Hofstede’s Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Collectiveness and Long-Term Orientation on student service quality expectations in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is collected via a survey consisting of items from a standard Hofstede and a higher education adapted SERVQUAL questionnaire. The survey sample includes 128 students who represent the entire population of a taught postgraduate course in Finance at a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI). Descriptive statistics and bivariate correlation analysis are used to describe and identify the relationship between student individual cultural values and student service quality expectations. Multiple regression analysis is applied to estimate the relationship between SERVQUAL constructs and items with respect to Hofstede’s cultural determinants.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that individual culture can influence student service quality expectations in higher education.

Practical implications

In a context of a prospective quality management approach, there is value for HEIs to explore the individual cultural profile of their students as a way of understanding and actively managing student service quality expectations.

Originality/value

To the authors’ best knowledge, no previous study combines the SERVQUAL and Hofstede models in exploring the impact of cultural values on student service quality expectations in higher education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Neeraj Kumar, Pooja Choudhary, Anees Ahmad, Swapnarag Swain and Pankaj Kumar Singh

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors affecting the quality of technical education in a developing nation, India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors affecting the quality of technical education in a developing nation, India.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 465 students and 310 faculty members who were randomly chosen from a total of 31 institutions/colleges/universities providing engineering education in Punjab state of India. The factor structures were obtained by applying factor analysis.

Findings

The result of this research reveals ten factors determining the quality of technical education, such as teaching practices, infrastructural facilities, industry–institute linkage, faculty's qualification, reputation of the institute, procedural simplification, administrative staff services, access and equity, financial burden of the course and work culture. Moreover, the research results also reveal eight factors affecting the quality of technical education, namely, institutional standards, institutional support, teaching environment, teaching practices, performance-linked promotion, work culture, academic freedom and administrative services in this order of preference are essential for the delivery of quality in technical education.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to examine the factor structure of technical education quality from both the perspectives of students and faculty. The implications of this study are expected to help the management of technical education institutes, regulatory agencies and the government in devising strategies to enhance the quality of technical education in India.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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