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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Mohammad S. Owlia and Elaine M. Aspinwall

In any quality improvement programme, measurement plays a vital role as it provides information for decision making. Finding the characteristics of quality is a…

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10866

Abstract

In any quality improvement programme, measurement plays a vital role as it provides information for decision making. Finding the characteristics of quality is a prerequisite for the measurement process. Despite recent research on general service’s quality dimensions, little work has been concentrated on public services and in particular higher education. Examines conceptual models proposed for different environments for consistency with higher education. Reviews quality factors found in the relevant literature and presents a new framework for the dimensions of quality in higher education.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Rose Sebastianelli and Nabil Tamimi

Uses survey results from a national sample of quality managers to examine the relationship between how a firm defines quality and what product quality dimensions it…

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16762

Abstract

Uses survey results from a national sample of quality managers to examine the relationship between how a firm defines quality and what product quality dimensions it considers important to its competitive strategy. Garvin proposed a well‐known framework for thinking about product quality based on eight dimensions: performance, features, reliability, conformance, durability, serviceability, aesthetics, and perceived quality. Alternative definitions of quality have evolved from five different approaches: transcendent, product‐based, user‐based, manufacturing‐based, and value‐based. Of the five approaches to defining quality, the manufacturing firms in our sample subscribed most often to the user‐based definition. Using regression analysis within a factor analytic framework, some empirical support was found for hypothesized linkages between the product quality dimensions and the alternative definitions of quality. Specifically, the user‐based definition was related significantly to aesthetics and perceived quality, the manufacturing‐based definition to conformance, and the product‐based definition to performance and features.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Riadh Ladhari

The purposes of this study are: to examine the reliability and validity of the lodging quality index (LQI); and to assess the relative importance of the five dimensions of…

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2375

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study are: to examine the reliability and validity of the lodging quality index (LQI); and to assess the relative importance of the five dimensions of the LQI in the Canadian hotel context. The LQI was developed by Getty and Getty and published in 2003 in the International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 200 Canadian respondents who had stayed in a hotel in Canada within the preceding three months. Data are examined using confirmatory factor analysis and regression analysis.

Findings

The findings support the reliability and the validity of the LQI's structure of five dimensions. The scale is shown to be a reliable instrument for measuring overall service quality and for predicting the satisfaction and behavioral intentions of hotel guests. In terms of the importance of the five dimensions, the study finds that “tangibility” and “communication” are the most important.

Originality/value

This is the first independent assessment of the reliability and validity of the LQI scale. The research provides valuable insights for hotel managers in Canada. Hoteliers should focus their efforts on the provision of good service quality on “tangibility” and “communication”.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Anupam Das, Vinod Kumar and Gour C. Saha

This research aims to examine the applicability of the Retail Service Quality Scale (RSQS) in retail stores in Kazakhstan, a country of the Commonwealth of Independent…

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2250

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the applicability of the Retail Service Quality Scale (RSQS) in retail stores in Kazakhstan, a country of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) that is in the transition stage from a controlled economy to a market economy. This research also attempts to identify the dimensions and sub‐dimensions that contribute to increasing the customer base.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 220 shoppers from department stores, discount stores, and supermarkets in Almaty city, Kazakhstan, was surveyed to examine the validity and reliability of the five dimensions (physical aspects, reliability, personal interaction, problem solving, and policy) and six sub‐dimensions (appearance, convenience, promises, doing‐it‐right, inspiring confidence and courteousness/helpfulness) of RSQS. The findings are cross‐validated hierarchically using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Step‐wise regression methods are used to identify the dimensions and sub‐dimensions contributing to increasing the customer base.

Findings

The research finds that the RSQS structure is a good fit in the Kazakhstan retail setting. The five dimensions and six sub‐dimensions together provide significant usefulness in measuring the quality of retail services. The research also finds that while all the dimensions and sub‐dimensions have a positive relationship, two dimensions (personal interaction, physical aspects) and one sub‐dimension (inspiring confidence) are strongly related to increasing the customer base through return customers and word of mouth from satisfied customers.

Research limitations/implications

The present study does not distinguish applicability of the RSQS in the different formats of the retail store. Future research should examine the impact of the different retail formats in using the scale for measuring retail service quality.

Practical implications

Prospective and existing retail service providers who place a high priority on quality can use this instrument to track the high growth potential of the retail sector in CIS countries. It will help to measure their services and increase their customer base by targeting the appropriate dimensions and sub‐dimensions.

Originality/value

The authors believe that this research reveals new insights about the retail sector in the context of CIS countries. This research also has managerial and research implications for designing and formulating operations strategy in providing retail services for new markets.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2019

Saikat Deb and Mokaddes Ali Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to estimate and compare the service quality of the city bus service measured by two different approaches which are subjective service quality

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate and compare the service quality of the city bus service measured by two different approaches which are subjective service quality dimensions and objective service quality dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective service quality dimensions have been estimated based on the benchmarking technique provided by the Ministry of Urban Development, India. For the analysis of subjective service quality dimensions, a questionnaire survey has been conducted to measure the users’ satisfaction and dissatisfaction about the service. The questionnaire consists of users’ socioeconomic characteristics and 23 questions related to city bus service quality dimensions. Questionnaire data have been analyzed by factor analysis, regression analysis and path analysis to find out the indicators representing subjective service quality dimensions. Finally, the overall service quality of the bus service has been determined based on both the measures.

Findings

The study indicates that the overall service quality of the bus service is different for subjective and objective analyses. While the objective measures show that the service quality is very good, the subjective measures indicate that the service is not doing well.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of the subjective dimensions is complicated. Analysis of the subjective dimensions needed more expertise and resources than the objective analysis.

Originality/value

In this study, the estimated service quality of the bus service is more reliable than the other methods as it comprises of both operators’ perspective and passengers’ expectations from the service.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Zhilin Yang, Robin T. Peterson and Shaohan Cai

The purpose of this article is to extend what is know about service quality in realm of the context of Internet retailing. As a result of content analyzing 1,078 consumer…

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5855

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to extend what is know about service quality in realm of the context of Internet retailing. As a result of content analyzing 1,078 consumer anecdotes of online shopping experiences, 14 service quality dimensions representing 42 items were identified. The unique contents of each service quality dimension relate to Internet commerce are examined and discussed. Further, the analysis uncovered a number of contributors to consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction. The most frequently‐mentioned service attributes resulting in consumer satisfaction were responsiveness, credibility, ease of use, reliability, and convenience. On the other hand, different dimensions including responsiveness, reliability, ease of use, credibility, and competence, were likely to dissatisfy online consumers. Finally, this paper provides various managerial implications and recommendations which may suggest avenues for improving service quality in Internet retailing and, as a corollary, expanding experiences by consumers.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

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Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Nur Asnawi and Nina Dwi Setyaningsih

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of service quality in the context of Islamic higher education (IHE); explain the determinant dimensions of overall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of service quality in the context of Islamic higher education (IHE); explain the determinant dimensions of overall perceived service quality (PSQ) according to students; and explains the difference in the level of quality felt by students in each dimension based on gender, year of study and level of education of students in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method from 384 questionnaires collected from students in four major cities in Indonesia; 378 questionnaires were declared valid for explanatory analysis using SEM-PLS and t-test.

Findings

The new model called Islamic Higher Education Service Quality (i-HESQUAL) with seven dimensions of quality that are considered important by students i.e. teaching capability and competence of academic staff (TCC), reliability of service (ROS), reputation of university (REP), responsiveness of employees (RES), empathy of employees (EMP), internalization of Islamic values (IIV) and library service support (LSS). The dimensions that influence the overall PSQ are the IIV and LSS. In addition, students based on the year of study have differences in assessing the dimensions of quality, namely the dimensions of TCC, ROS, IIV, LSS, while the level of education also has differences, especially on the dimensions of ROS, REP and LSS.

Research limitations/implications

This research was only carried out at four public Islamic universities, for that there is a need for further research in the form of longitudinal studies with different geographical samples e.g. in the perspective of private universities to generalize research results.

Practical implications

The i-HESQUAL dimensions can be used by IHE managers to measure their performance according to students' perspectives. The two dimensions that determine the overall PSQ should be IHE's strategic advantages and the dimensions that do not affect the overall PSQ are feedback to identify weaknesses.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to PSQ research in the context of IHE, which operates on the values and culture that surrounds it (Islamic culture), while most of the previous research was conducted in the context of developed countries with a secular education system.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2020

Ramesh Roshan Das Guru and Marcel Paulssen

Product quality is a central construct in several management domains. Theoretical conceptualizations of product quality unanimously stress its multidimensional nature…

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1103

Abstract

Purpose

Product quality is a central construct in several management domains. Theoretical conceptualizations of product quality unanimously stress its multidimensional nature. Yet, no generalizable, multidimensional product quality scale exists. This study develops and validates a multidimensional Customers’ experienced product quality (CEPQ) scale, across four diverse product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the exploratory studies, CEPQ is conceptualized as a second-order reflective-formative construct and validated in quantitative studies with survey data collected in the USA.

Findings

Results reveal that the CEPQ scale and its underlying quality dimensions possess sound psychometric properties. In addition, CEPQ has a substantial impact on customer behavior over and above customer satisfaction. The strength of this impact is positively moderated by expertise and quality consciousness. CEPQ predicts objective quality scores from consumer reports substantially better than the existing measures of product quality.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the main study, as well as samples from only one country, restricts the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Operations managers and marketers should start to measure CEPQ as an additional key metric. The formative weights of the first-order quality dimensions explain how customers define product quality in a specific product category.

Originality/value

A generalizable, multidimensional scale of product quality, CEPQ, is developed and validated. Materials as a new product quality dimension is identified. Once correctly measured, product quality ceases to be a mere input to satisfaction. Boundary conditions for CEPQ’s relevance were hypothesized and confirmed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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