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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Hairuddin Mohd Ali and Mohammed Borhandden Musah

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also…

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2896

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 267 academic staff from the International Islamic University Malaysia completed the survey questionnaires. A principal component analysis (PCA) technique was performed to extract the underlying factors, followed by the application of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test factorial validity of the constructs.

Findings

The analysis yielded a nine‐factor‐indexed quality culture construct, while the workforce construct constituted two factors. The findings of the study postulate statistically significant correlation between quality culture and workforce performance.

Practical implications

The findings of the study suggest that a quality culture initiative can be used effectively in the context of the Malaysian higher education sector to enhance academic staff performance.

Originality/value

The results are important since there have been few published studies on quality culture that examine its effects on academic staff performance in the Malaysian higher education sector.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Kit Fai Pun and Surujdaye Jaggernath‐Furlonge

Although many adherents openly praise the importance of quality management practices (QMP) in organisations, others have identified significant costs and implementation…

Abstract

Although many adherents openly praise the importance of quality management practices (QMP) in organisations, others have identified significant costs and implementation obstacles. Some recent studies showed that QMP have failed due to the ignorance of quality cultures. How to improve the success rate of QMP in organisations has become a critical issue both in the academy and in practice. This paper discusses the common enablers of and cultural impacts on QMP. It explores the dimensions of national versus organisational culture, and identifies the main features of four quality culture models as advocated in the literature in relation to facilitating QMP in organisations. It was found that flat structures, decentralised functions, empowerment, flexibility, innovation, limited rules and regulations and teamwork favor the QMP implementation. For facilitating culture changes for QMP, values associated with low power distance, low uncertainty avoidance and collectivism would have to be nurtured. Further research is needed to incorporate the findings and develop a practical quality culture approach for real applications in industry.

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Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2000

Scott A. Dellana and Richard D. Hauser

The purpose of this research is to further examine the relationship between organizational culture and a strategic approach to quality, as embodied in Malcolm Baldrige…

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162

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to further examine the relationship between organizational culture and a strategic approach to quality, as embodied in Malcolm Baldrige Quality award criteria. To accomplish this, a questionnaire was developed for a postal survey. The questionnaire was based upon the Competing Values Model of Culture and the Baldrige Award criteria to define the position of the company in their strategic quality approach. This questionnaire was then sent to 1000 members of the American Society for Quality. A total of 219 usable responses were received and analyzed. The results indicate that higher Baldrige scores tend to be significantly related to the Adhocracy and Group cultural types.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Peter Cronemyr, Ingela Bäckström and Åsa Rönnbäck

Today’s organisations face the challenge of measuring the right things and then using those measurements as a starting point to work with improved quality. The failure to…

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1170

Abstract

Purpose

Today’s organisations face the challenge of measuring the right things and then using those measurements as a starting point to work with improved quality. The failure to generate a shared value base is pointed out as one main cause for the inability to effectively apply quality management and lean within organisations; thus, it appears central to measure these values. However, the measuring of values and behaviours seems to be missing within both concepts. Therefore, there is a need for a tool that measures not only quality values but also behaviours that support or obstruct a quality culture. The purpose of this paper is to describe how a measuring tool which measures quality culture can be designed and structured.

Design/methodology/approach

A project with the aim to measure and develop quality culture started in 2015 by three Swedish universities/institutes and seven organisations. During several workshops, quality values and supportive and obstructive behaviours were developed and described. This resulted in a survey where employees of the participating organisations ranked performance and importance of the described behaviours. The results were presented and discussed in a fourth workshop.

Findings

A framework of behaviours and a measurement tool for a quality culture are presented in this paper.

Originality/value

The framework of behaviours, supporting or obstructing a quality culture, is original and may be very useful to diagnose and develop a quality culture.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 9 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Ulf Daniel Ehlers

The purpose of this paper is to develop a holistic understanding of quality in higher education which reveals the current debates about accreditation or quality process…

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9241

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a holistic understanding of quality in higher education which reveals the current debates about accreditation or quality process standards as insufficient, and to propose an enhanced model for quality culture in educational organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework is based on relevant research in the field of quality development for education, and integrates it with a series of previously published works related to quality methodologies, quality literacy and quality as a multidimensional concept. Quality is approached from an educational science perspective, and is understood as a relationship among all the participants and resources of an educational scenario.

Findings

The paper establishes the foundation for a comprehensive understanding and analysis of quality culture in organisations, focussing on higher education. While this understanding of quality as part of the organisational culture seems to gain more importance there is still a lack of fundamental research and conceptual understanding of the phenomenon in itself. Quality development in higher education is often limited to bureaucratic documentation, and disregards the development of quality as an organisation's holistic culture. However, there is a need to focus on promoting a quality culture which is enabling individual actors to continuously improve their educational practice.

Originality/value

The original value of the paper is to approach quality development in higher education from an organisation's cultural perspective. When the conceptual foundations for empirical research are worked out, the professionals can benefit by understanding the interrelated nature of educational quality and organisational culture in higher education institutions.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Chris Hart and Michael Shoolbred

Suggests that, while quality systems and the measurement of qualityin higher education are much discussed, there has been little focus onwhat quality organizations are…

Abstract

Suggests that, while quality systems and the measurement of quality in higher education are much discussed, there has been little focus on what quality organizations are actually like to work in. Quality systems generate a quality culture and this is what is at the heart of successful quality organizations. Examines organizational culture and indicates the main features of successful quality cultures appropriate to higher education. It links these with quality values and beliefs. These are expressed in terms of rites and rituals, myths and legends within the organization. Readers are invited to consider their own organizational culture by working through a specially designed exercise. They are asked how rewards and recognition can be made relevant to a quality culture and what will happen if some parts of HE fail to adopt a quality ethos in keeping with the values of higher education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

The concept of company culture is now playingan ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavourto work towards ever better companymanagement, particularly in the…

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2517

Abstract

The concept of company culture is now playing an ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better company management, particularly in the industrial field. This monograph reviews the history and development of both national and company cultures, and then goes on to demonstrate the significance of a culture to proper company management. Well‐managed companies will have both a “quality culture” and a “safety culture” as well as a cultural history. However, it has to be recognised that the company culture is subject to change, and effecting this can be very difficult. Of the many national cultures, that of Japan is considered to be the most effective, as is demonstrated by the present dominance of Japan on the industrial scene. Many industrialised nations now seek to emulate the Japanese style of management, but it is not possible to copy or acquire Japan′s cultural heritage. The text is illustrated by a large number of practical examples from real life, illustrating the way in which the company culture works and can be used by management to improve company performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Lawrence M. Corbett and Kate N. Rastrick

For many years culture has been claimed as an important component of organizational success in general and TQM and quality improvement in particular. This study examined…

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6147

Abstract

For many years culture has been claimed as an important component of organizational success in general and TQM and quality improvement in particular. This study examined management culture and quality performance in a sample of New Zealand manufacturing organizations. The culture was measured using the Organizational Culture Inventory, and quality performance was measured using questions from Leading the Way: A Study of Best Manufacturing Practices in Australia and New Zealand. Different management cultures were found to have correlations with quality indicators such as: warranty claims, percent defectives, ratio of quality inspectors to direct production workers, and delivery in full on time. No significant correlations were found between the organizational cultures and cost of quality, or with supplier quality. We suggest that through understanding these relationships between culture and quality, managers may be able to develop more effective and competitive organizations.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jörg Markowitsch

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the concept of “school quality management culture” in relation to the general notion of “school organizational culture” and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the concept of “school quality management culture” in relation to the general notion of “school organizational culture” and to review empirical studies that scrutinised the relation between organisational culture and quality management practices in education and business.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on an extensive literature review that was conducted as part of a project, which intends to develop an instrument to diagnose schools’ quality management culture in initial vocational education.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that school quality (management) culture exists and differs from school (organisational) culture. A pluralist view of culture and a differentiation perspective are more appropriate to explain the complex relationship between culture and quality practices than unified or integrated approaches. However, they also pose a challenge to empirical studies because they call for longitudinal and multi-method research designs.

Research limitations/implications

The reciprocal relation between quality practices and school culture asks for a longitudinal and comparative research design. The findings also suggest using multi-perspective and multi-method approaches, and recommend cooperation between different but comparable fields such as education, health or social work.

Practical implications

This paper offers a literature base and a theoretical model to improve existing data collection tools to support quality management in vocational and other educational institutions.

Originality/value

Apart from the ideological question on whether “culture” is something an organisation is or an organisation has, the paper examines the question as to whether more “quality”-conducive cultures can be discerned from less conducive ones in schools. Furthermore, it deliberates on whether an organisation’s quality management culture is part of, or different from, an organisation’s overall culture and presents models to guide empirical analyses.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Sarah Jinhui Wu, Dongli Zhang and Roger G. Schroeder

This study aims to investigate how firms should customize quality practices to obtain or maintain quality advantage with the development of quality culture. The paper…

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5943

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how firms should customize quality practices to obtain or maintain quality advantage with the development of quality culture. The paper seeks to adopt March's learning framework and to differentiate quality management practices into two bundles: exploitation and exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey dataset, including 238 manufacturing plants located in eight countries and three industries was used to test the hypotheses. The total sample was classified into two groups depending on the maturity of quality culture, and regression analysis was conducted in each of the groups for comparison.

Findings

Data analysis results show that quality exploitation practices are highly related to performance outcome when quality culture has not become a prevailing organization culture. In contrast, quality exploration practices are significantly associated with operations performance after quality culture plays a critical role in organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications

The findings encourage future research on customization of quality management practices.

Practical implications

The findings suggest when it is more appropriate to adopt explorative‐ oriented quality practices and when to adopt exploitative‐oriented quality practices to make quality management programs more effective.

Originality/value

This paper advances the understanding of quality management practices from the context‐dependent perspective. Particularly, the study suggests the selective adoption of certain quality management practices based on the evolvement of quality culture.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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