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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Michele Y. Burpeau‐Di Gregorio and John W. Dickson

Quality circles have become one of the most commonly used remedies to reverse the decline in productivity in business organisations. In this article, the authors draw upon…

Abstract

Quality circles have become one of the most commonly used remedies to reverse the decline in productivity in business organisations. In this article, the authors draw upon the experiences of quality circles in four US organisations in order to make some general observations.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Jyoti Prakas Majumdar and B. Murali Manohar

Quality Circle is a very effective program and low‐cost tool for implementing total quality management (TQM) in industry. A good number of manufacturing industries have so…

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1004

Abstract

Purpose

Quality Circle is a very effective program and low‐cost tool for implementing total quality management (TQM) in industry. A good number of manufacturing industries have so far adopted the Quality Circle program successfully, however the Quality Circle concept has failed in many other cases. To make successful use of the Quality Circle tool in manufacturing industries, knowledge and awareness of the probable reasons behind the failures of the Quality Circle is essential.

Design/methodology/approach

In this general review paper, after thoroughly reviewing literatures, the authors consolidate and highlight the probable reasons behind the failures of the Quality Circle, especially in manufacturing industries.

Findings

This study reveals that organizational Issues at the background stage; circle‐formation Issues at the implementation stage; and operational Issues at the operating/running stage of Quality Circle implementation, are the three main key areas of the problems which generally limit the success of the Quality Circle.

Originality/value

If the management is aware of and takes care of such anticipated problems, it is more likely that the Quality Circle programme will definitely be a success, leading to the effective implementation of TQM in the organization.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

M.J. Isaac

The objective here is to critically assess the essential characteristics of quality circles and to focus attention on the factors and conditions which are crucial to the…

Abstract

The objective here is to critically assess the essential characteristics of quality circles and to focus attention on the factors and conditions which are crucial to the successful implementation of quality circles at Cosalt Holiday Homes. The proposed quality circle programme for Cosalt is discussed and methods of implementation, together with progress to date and recommendations for the future are given. Amongst the main findings is a view that there is a need for a clear commitment from top management, together with a proper organisational climate and favourable shopfloor attitudes for successful implementation of a quality circle programme.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Joachim Deppe

With the foundation of the National Quality Circle Society in the Federal Republic of Germany, a forum has been established for small group work and the promotion of…

Abstract

With the foundation of the National Quality Circle Society in the Federal Republic of Germany, a forum has been established for small group work and the promotion of Quality Circle ideas. The number of firms in the FRG who use Quality Circles is growing and a historical account is provided. Examples of Quality Circle work in German firms is given.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

B.G. Dale

Sixty‐seven British companies took part in a survey to determine causes of failure of quality circles. The main reasons determined were: rejection of the concept by top…

Abstract

Sixty‐seven British companies took part in a survey to determine causes of failure of quality circles. The main reasons determined were: rejection of the concept by top management and trade unions; the disruption caused by redundancies and company restructuring; labour turnover; lack of co‐operation from middle and first line management; and failure by circle leaders to find enough time to organise meetings. The author was optimistic about the findings since growth in the number of companies using circles and the average number of circles per company is still taking place.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Dov Elizur

Quality circles have recently been suggested as atechnique for enhancing employees′ quality of worklife and satisfaction with their work. This studyattempts to analyse the…

Abstract

Quality circles have recently been suggested as a technique for enhancing employees′ quality of work life and satisfaction with their work. This study attempts to analyse the relationships between employees′ participation in quality circles, their sense of quality of work life, perceived job reinforcement capacity and job satisfaction. One hundred and forty‐three employees of a large industrial corporation in Israel, half of them regularly participating in quality circles and half not participating, were surveyed. The results support the hypotheses of the study. A positive relationship was found between participation in quality circles and various aspects of quality of work life, perceived job reinforcement capacity and job satisfaction. Results are discussed in the context of the arguments concerning the effects of participation in quality circles.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

J. Lees and B.G. Dale

A postal questionnaire survey of quality circles in the UK service sector has been completed. It was revealed that there are no major differences in the characteristics of…

Abstract

A postal questionnaire survey of quality circles in the UK service sector has been completed. It was revealed that there are no major differences in the characteristics of circle programmes in the service and manufacturing organisations. However, service industries need to be aware of the individuality of each organisation before adoption of programmes.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

M.T. Vaziri

Japan's adoption (and adaption) of QC circles 10 years earlier than most of the rest of the world, and the role this has played in Japan's advancement as an industrialised…

Abstract

Japan's adoption (and adaption) of QC circles 10 years earlier than most of the rest of the world, and the role this has played in Japan's advancement as an industrialised nation, is examined. The growth of circles in Japan is charted, and a consideration is given of the implementation of QC circles in other Far Eastern countries, South America, Europe and the US. Training at various levels, to overcome the shortage of qualified people, is discussed. A comparison is made between QC circles and other more conventional motivational plans, and five main issues are analysed; a comparison is also made between Japanese and Western industry and their respective worker attitudes. The necessity for QC circles to become established in the US, and considered a fundamental human resource enhancement, rather than a foolish fad, is stated.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Michel Brossard

The purpose of the article is to show, through acase study, that the reasons motivating membersand non‐members of a quality circle to improvequality are not limited to…

Abstract

The purpose of the article is to show, through a case study, that the reasons motivating members and non‐members of a quality circle to improve quality are not limited to those formulated in the literature. We thereby concur with Fiona Wilson who, in an article published in a recent issue of Employee Relations, showed that the psychological reward is not enough. In the workshops under study, members and non‐members obtained better working conditions – for example lay‐offs have stopped, transfer of employees from one workshop to another or from one job station to another is a thing of the past – by improving quality through the direct impact that their action was having on the organisation′s position in the market and, consequently, on the increase of production volumes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Examines the origins and development of quality circles over 30 years in the production division of Qatar Steel Company.

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694

Abstract

Purpose

Examines the origins and development of quality circles over 30 years in the production division of Qatar Steel Company.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on data from a self‐administered questionnaire that was distributed to 400 qualitycircle members in the five departments of the company's production division.

Findings

Reveals that top‐management support is the biggest single factor in helping to ensure the success of quality circles. Education and training in qualitycircle techniques are also important.

Practical implications

Creates awareness among management and employees of the strategic importance of quality circles to organizational success.

Social implications

Reveals that quality circles can also boost employees' sense of self‐worth.

Originality/value

Describes the successful adoption and implementation of quality circles in a manufacturing firm in a developing country of the Middle East.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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