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Article

Halima Egberongbe, Barbara Sen and Peter Willett

Organizations constantly evaluate their activities to ensure that they are attaining their management goals. Maturity assessment enables organizations to examine their…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations constantly evaluate their activities to ensure that they are attaining their management goals. Maturity assessment enables organizations to examine their capabilities, support innovation and evaluate development. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the maturity statuses of a selection of Nigerian university libraries in a study to investigate their quality management (QM) approaches. The study provides recommendations for means to attain the required statuses in academic library development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a multisite case study in which interviews were conducted with 15 university librarians (or their representatives) and ten focus groups were conducted with non-management library staff. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using an aspect of framework analysis – charting, while a maturity model from the field of project management (Prince 2 Maturity Model, P2MM) was used to assess maturity in QM of the libraries.

Findings

The results of the maturity assessment indicate a basic knowledge of the concept of QM implementation among the libraries. The scores obtained on the P2MM capability scale placed the libraries studied mainly on Level 1 (awareness level) of the model.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates that the culture of QM in academic libraries in Nigeria is at a low level with considerable potential for development. It is suggested that future adoption of quality maturity models to assess performance and organizational effectiveness would aid improvements for value-added services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to attempt the assessment of quality maturity levels in Nigerian academic libraries for identification of the organization’s positioning in QM and strategy.

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Article

Marcelo Albuquerque Oliveira and Isabel Lopes

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new maturity model to identify the current state of maintenance area of organizations and drives actions to increase efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new maturity model to identify the current state of maintenance area of organizations and drives actions to increase efficiency and effectiveness toward the concept known as world-class.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed based on an extensive literature review on maintenance management and maturity assessment, which allowed identifying the relevant factors in maintenance management and the world-class behaviors for each factor. The progressive maturity levels for each of the identified ten factors form the model. To test its effectiveness, it was applied to the maintenance area of three companies.

Findings

The model application showed that, in addition to being a self-assessment tool, it provides knowledge, to those who use it, on behaviors or practices that enable world-class results. For each factor, potential gaps and the desired state were defined focusing on behaviors rather than on indicators values or adopted methodologies, which facilitates the identification of improvement actions that lead to better performance.

Research limitations/implications

Through its use, maturity levels can be identified for all considered maintenance management factors, however, the overall maturity of the maintenance area is not determined. Although this overall evaluation can be done assigning a weight to each factor, it was not considered an added value for the set purpose.

Originality/value

The proposed maturity model contributes to the understanding of the maintenance management process and how to stand out nowadays in an area that has an increasingly important impact on productivity and quality.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Nadia Ramadan and Mazen Arafeh

Healthcare providers differ in their readiness and maturity levels regarding quality and quality management systems applications. The proposed model serves as a useful…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare providers differ in their readiness and maturity levels regarding quality and quality management systems applications. The proposed model serves as a useful quantitative quality maturity level assessment tool for healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The model proposes five quality maturity levels (chaotic, primitive, structured, mature and proficient) based on six quality drivers: top management, people, operations, culture, quality focus and accreditation.

Findings

Healthcare managers can apply the model to identify the status quo, quality shortcomings and evaluating ongoing progress.

Practical implications

The model has been incorporated in an interactive Excel worksheet that visually displays the quality maturity level risk meter. The tool has been applied successfully to local hospitals.

Originality/value

The proposed six quality driver scales appear to measure healthcare provider maturity levels on a single quality meter.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Victor E. Sower, Ross Quarles and Eric Broussard

The purposes of this study are to examine the relationship between the distribution of quality costs and the level of maturity of an organization's quality system, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study are to examine the relationship between the distribution of quality costs and the level of maturity of an organization's quality system, to assess the extent to which effective COQ systems and maturing quality systems affect organization performance, and to determine why some organizations do not utilize COQ systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was developed to determine the distribution of total quality cost among the four ASQ categories. The instrument also assesses the maturity of the organization's quality system using the ANSI/ISO/ASQ Q9004‐2000 performance maturity level classification system. Correlation analysis was used to examine the relationships between quality costs and quality system maturity.

Findings

External failure costs were found to decline as a percentage of total cost of quality (COQ) as an organization's quality system matures. Total COQ was found to increase as an organization moved from a very low level of quality system maturity to a higher level. Sales and profit growth were not significantly correlated with the presence of a quality cost system or with the level of maturity of the quality system. Lack of management support was found to be the most common reason why organizations do not systematically track quality costs.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is needed to determine the relationship between the presence of a COQ system and its effective integration with the quality system and organizational outcomes. Future research is needed to expand the study beyond the boundaries of the USA. Future research involving longitudinal studies would be beneficial in more accurately assessing the nature of the changes in COQ distribution over time.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that organizations planning to implement a COQ system should ensure that management supports the program and is prepared for a short‐term increase in total COQ. These findings also support the often‐suggested expectation that in the long run the COQ system will lead to a significant reduction in external failure costs.

Originality/value

Systematic measurement of COQ is underutilized in practice. This study systematically examines why this is the case. In addition the study provides information that can be useful in justifying implementation of COQ measurement systems.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Woon Kin Chung

Since the early 1980s, benchmarking has been widely used as a strategy for organisations to make progress in their TQM maturity. Quality award models provide a…

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, benchmarking has been widely used as a strategy for organisations to make progress in their TQM maturity. Quality award models provide a comprehensive framework for the application and study of benchmarking. However, many of the studies are case‐based and anecdotal in nature. This study undertakes a benchmarking exercise among Singapore’s productivity leaders, which comprised the pioneer batch of organisations in the Singapore Quality Award programme. The secondary data obtained from these organisations are used for the analysis. The findings cover the best practice levels attained, strengths and weaknesses of the organisations, disparities in maturity of practices, areas with high priority for improvement, and association between TQM maturity and business performance. Policy‐wise, they suggest actions that should be taken to raise the TQM maturity of the organisations. They also provide a basis for comparisons in future studies, and for the further development of theoretical propositions.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Mohammad Issack Santally, Yousra Banoor Rajabalee, Roopesh Kevin Sungkur, Mohammad Iqbal Maudarbocus and Wolfgang Greller

The University of Mauritius (UoM) established as a traditional face-to-face university has been engaged in distance education since 1993 and in e-learning since 2001 to…

Abstract

Purpose

The University of Mauritius (UoM) established as a traditional face-to-face university has been engaged in distance education since 1993 and in e-learning since 2001 to establish itself as a dual-mode institution. In a context where it has engaged itself to promote its internationalization of online courses and a digital learning transformation process, there is a need to assess and evaluate its current e-learning capability to identify areas of good practices and opportunities for improvement to ensure a high quality of e-learning provisions. The paper reports the results of an assessment of the e-learning capability and the related quality assurance processes of the University of the Mauritius using the e-learning Maturity Model (eMM). Quality assurance in higher education is still a key issue, especially with the ever-growing influence of technology and the disruption that the Internet has caused with respect to e-learning and distance education provisions. No university in Mauritius has ever engaged in such an assessment of their e-learning capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The EMM and the Open Learning Consortium Quality Scorecard Suite were found to be the most complete models in terms of available documentation and description of how to carry out the evaluation with respect to each process area as compared to the other models described in the literature review section. The EMM was, however, chosen as the model to be used for the UoM, given that there already exists a body of knowledge about its applications in different universities that operate in similar contexts. The researcher is at the heart of the process in the role of an ‘eLearning quality auditor’. Therefore, the research used mainly desk studies, and analysis of annual reports as well as a consultative approach with key stakeholders based on a consensus model to reach a rating for each element in the EMMv2.3 instrument. The rating is based on evidence that is available and verifiable through desk research and documentation.

Findings

We found out that the main strengths of the university were in the learning process areas mainly because of the need to follow existing quality assurance procedures in place at different phases of a course of life cycle, irrespective of the course modality. On the other hand, across all process areas, the university fared well in the delivery dimension, and this finding is consistent with other universities that were assessed using the EMM. However, it was found that the EMM in current form was more adapted for the assessment of universities operating fully as open or virtual universities rather than those operating as dual-mode institutions or as traditional universities promoting technology-enabled learning. The weakest link was the optimization dimension across all process areas, and the process area that needs more attention for improvement was the evaluation process area. Overall, the university can reasonably be pitched at level two (Repeatable) of the capability maturity model scale used for information systems maturity assessment, but operating towards level three (Defined).

Originality/value

The work presented here has never been carried out for any university in Mauritius, and there have been no reported evaluations or applications within the African region. It allows the university to benchmark and compare its standing with respect to other universities operating as dual-mode institutions and as a reference for other universities in Mauritius as well.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Scott Dellana and John Kros

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of ISO 9001 certification and diffusion in the USA in relation to organizational supply chain position, quality maturity

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of ISO 9001 certification and diffusion in the USA in relation to organizational supply chain position, quality maturity, and supplier quality maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for comparison in this study comes from an e-mail survey questionnaire of supply chain professionals across the USA. A pilot survey was initially e-mailed to 100 supply chain professionals and preliminary data from 27 respondents were used to revise the questionnaire. Respondents to the revised questionnaire returned 565 e-mailed questionnaires out of 2,924 active e-mail addresses.

Findings

The results suggest that companies adopting ISO 9001 are likely doing so as part of an overall quality management program more so than from direct market pressure. It appears that ISO 9001 certification rates differ by organizational position in the supply chain. ISO 9001 certified organizations are more likely to have quality programs of greater maturity and suppliers with greater quality maturity than organizations that are not ISO 9001 certified. Certified organizations are also more likely to use suppliers that are ISO 9001 capable or certified than non-ISO 9001 organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Not all industry groups or supply chain positions were well-represented due to some small sub-group sizes.

Practical implications

The study of ISO 9001 certification in US organizations has been lacking in the literature. Given the weak adoption rate of ISO 9001 in the USA, this study helps characterize ISO 9001 certification from a supply chain perspective and explores possible reasons for low certification rates.

Originality/value

This research extends the knowledge of quality management in the supply chain by studying ISO 9001 certification in relation to supply chain position and differences in quality maturity between certified and non-certified organizations in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article

Rajko Novak and Aleksander Janeš

The purpose of this paper is to empirically evaluate business process orientation (BPO) of the Slovenian power supply business.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically evaluate business process orientation (BPO) of the Slovenian power supply business.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the empirical investigation, the level of BPO maturity was measured in the 19 organizations of the power supply business. The survey was focused on the top, middle and lower managers. As a measuring instrument, a questionnaire for the extended concept of process orientation with nine elements was used.

Findings

The results of the BPO measurement show that, despite this long-standing preoccupation with processes, certified management system and the computerization of operations, process maturity is not high. Particularly the lowest score for information technology represents a surprise.

Practical implications

This research makes significant contributions to the literature and above all to scholars and practitioners who work professionally in this field and will find useful guidance for a better understanding of applying BPO and maturity models.

Social implications

One important reason for performing the maturity measurement in the power supply business is the importance of its activities for the operation and development and environmental impact of the whole of Slovenian society.

Originality/value

Presented research is the first one which considers the BPO maturity in the Slovenian power supply business and therefore contributes to understanding of the “intangible factors” which have impact on the introduction of business process management and BPO.

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Article

Frankie Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to present the complete details of the Quality Maturity Model (QMM), and the associated Quality Culture Assessment Instrument (QCAI). The QMM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the complete details of the Quality Maturity Model (QMM), and the associated Quality Culture Assessment Instrument (QCAI). The QMM provides a framework for libraries to self-assess their progress towards achieving a culture of quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a Design Science approach and predominantly grounded theory methodology to develop the QMM as a roadmap that defines an ordinal scale for measuring the maturity of an academic library’s quality culture.

Findings

The QMM describes seven facets of quality culture, and five levels for each facet.

Practical implications

The QCAI enables libraries to locate themselves within the quality maturity landscape. They will then be able to use the QMM as a roadmap to plan their route to improvement. Such a strategic approach to improvement allows libraries to make sense of the literature in terms of what is appropriate for them, so avoiding expensive irrelevancies.

Originality/value

The QMM is unique. There are other models that assess quality culture, but the details of these models are kept secret and the only way to be assessed is by paying a consultancy fee. There are other models that make their details public, but they describe only one or two aspects of quality culture, not all.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Dayu Jin, Kah-Hin Chai and Kay-Chuan Tan

– The purpose of this paper is to rigorously devise a new tool that helps analyze and improve NSD processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to rigorously devise a new tool that helps analyze and improve NSD processes.

Design/methodology/approach

An NSD maturity model (NSDMM) is theoretically developed through a combination of the maturity model concept and findings from NSD success studies.

Findings

NSD success factors can be categorized into four management processes – strategy management, process formalization, knowledge management, and customer involvement. Maturity dimensions and levels are further devised for each process. It is hypothesized that a higher capability to handle these processes positively associates with higher NSD performance.

Research limitations/implications

Studies on NSD success factors are often descriptive rather than prescriptive. This research identified four management processes which are important to focus on when implementing NSD projects. It is among the first to apply the maturity model in the service industry. That said, this research needs to be tested empirically.

Practical implications

The proposed NSDMM enables companies to conduct evaluations of their NSD capabilities. By determining the desired maturity levels, companies can engage in continuous improvement so as to calibrate the NSD process.

Originality/value

By integrating the concept of the maturity model and the NSD success studies, NSDMM serves not only as a diagnostic model to assess current NSD practices, but also as a guideline for continuous NSD process improvement.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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