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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Christoph H. Glock, Mohamad Y. Jaber and Cory Searcy

The purpose of this paper is to present a mathematical model that illustrates the trade‐offs between sustainability, demand, costs, and profit in a supply chain with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a mathematical model that illustrates the trade‐offs between sustainability, demand, costs, and profit in a supply chain with a single supplier and a single manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

It is assumed that a single product is produced and sold on a market where demand is sensitive to price and quality. Sustainability is treated as a quality attribute and is measured in terms of the levels of scrap and emissions generated in the supply chain. It is assumed that the emissions and scrap can be controlled by varying production rates or by investing in production processes. The impact of cooperative and non‐cooperative behaviour between the supplier and the manufacturer is explored. Numerical studies are used to illustrate the behaviour of the model.

Findings

The analysis shows that the supplier and the manufacturer can attract additional customers by controlling scrap and emissions. The behaviour of the supplier and the manufacturer are dictated by the decision criteria, such as changes in the level of sustainability, used by customers to evaluate the product. It is shown that the profit of the system is higher and that the level of quality is lower in the case of cooperation than in the case of non‐cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

Several areas for future work are highlighted. The study of alternative demand functions, linking sustainability to a monetary component, including additional players, and incorporating additional sustainability indicators all offer possibilities for extending the model.

Originality/value

There is an identified need for analytical models that consider sustainability in the supply chain. The results are especially important for companies operating in markets where customers perceive the sustainability of a product as a quality criterion.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Maxim A Bushuev, Alfred Guiffrida, M. Y. Jaber and Mehmood Khan

This paper aims to give a comprehensive review, summary, and discussion on inventory models that have appeared in the literature. During these past ten decades, no seminal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give a comprehensive review, summary, and discussion on inventory models that have appeared in the literature. During these past ten decades, no seminal paper reviewing the field of inventory lot sizing has even been published. This limitation has been identified in the literature by several researchers over the years, with the sheer volume of the number of published inventory lot sizing models acting as a factor which has limited a research endeavor to review the literature on inventory lot sizing models.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews research on inventory lot size models and provides a review of previously published literature review papers on inventory models. Based on this initial review, the literature extending current research practices on inventory modeling in supply chains and in sustainable practices is presented. Directions for expanding research in these two areas are examined in light of concerns expressed in the historical use of inventory models and in light of a new inventory research paradigm.

Findings

In our paper, we have adopted a novel strategy to overcome this limitation by focusing our review on a review of inventory lot sizing review papers.

Originality/value

By adopting the methodology of reviewing published inventory review papers, we can contribute a comprehensive review of the inventory lot sizing literature that serves to provide in one paper a consolidation of inventory research that can serve as a single source to keep researchers up to date with the research developments in inventory lot sizing models. We also identify gaps in the field which could stimulate new research agendas in the areas of supply chain management and sustainable inventory practices.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Craig R. Carter, Lutz Kaufmann and David J. Ketchen

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theorization of the unintended consequences of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theorization of the unintended consequences of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors integrate extant theory of unintended consequences, sustainable supply chain management and paradox theory to develop a typology of the unintended consequences of SSCM initiatives and a conceptual model of the antecedents of these unintended consequences.

Findings

The authors advance a mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive typology of the unintended consequences of SSCM initiatives. These unintended consequences include trade-offs as well as synergies in the form of positive spillover. The authors’ conceptual model identifies multiple levels of stakeholders, multiple performance dimensions, multiple time horizons and the interplay with social construction as antecedents to the unintended consequences of SSCM initiatives.

Practical implications

The authors’ typology suggests that managers must move beyond simply assessing whether the intended consequences of an SSCM initiative have been achieved. Managers must also, to the extent they can, assess the potential for unintended consequences to arise. The authors’ typology provides an initial roadmap for managers to continue, discontinue or further consider an SSCM initiative, based on the resulting unintended consequences. The authors’ theorization also provides guidance about how managers can more successfully bring SSCM initiatives to fruition and start cycles of learning.

Originality/value

There largely has been a focus in the operations and supply chain management literature on trade-offs between economic performance on the one hand and social or environmental performance on the other. The authors advocate that this focus needs to shift to interactions within and between social and environmental performance. Further, trade-offs are only one type of unintended consequence. By developing a mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive typology, the authors introduce a much clearer conceptualization of the unintended consequences of an SSCM initiative and a much better understanding of how to manage SSCM initiatives, both prior to and postimplementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Christoph H Glock and Taebok Kim

This paper studies a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers and a single buyer. It considers the case where a set of heterogeneous trucks is used for transporting…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper studies a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers and a single buyer. It considers the case where a set of heterogeneous trucks is used for transporting products, and develops a mathematical model that coordinates the supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to minimise the costs of producing and delivering a product as well as carbon emissions resulting from transportation. In addition, the authors analyse how imposing a tax on carbon emissions impacts the delivery of products from the suppliers to the buyer.

Design/methodology/approach

It is assumed that heterogeneous vehicles are used for transporting products, which have different performance and cost attributes. A mathematical model that considers both operating costs and carbon emissions from transportation is developed. The impact of vehicle attributes on lot sizing and routing decisions is studied with the help of numerical examples and a sensitivity analysis.

Findings

The analysis shows that considering carbon emissions in coordinating a supply chain leads to changes in the routing of vehicles. It is further shown that if carbon emissions lead to costs, routes are changed in such a way that vehicles travel long distances empty or with a low vehicle load to reduce fuel consumption and therewith emissions.

Research limitations/implications

Several areas for future work are highlighted. The study of alternative supply chain structures, for example structures which include logistics service providers, or the investigation of different functional relationships between vehicle load and emission generation offer possibilities for extending the model.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to study the use of heterogeneous vehicles in an inventory model of a supply chain, and one of the few supply chain inventory models that consider ecological aspects.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Ebenezer Afum, Innocent Senyo Kwasi Acquah, Essel Dacosta, Charles Baah and Esther Ahenkorah

The priority giving to green practices in today's competitive market has made green logistics management practices (GLMPS) a significant driver of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The priority giving to green practices in today's competitive market has made green logistics management practices (GLMPS) a significant driver of organizational performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of GLMPS, logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability on sustainability performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses structured questionnaires to gather data from 274 managers of manufacturing firms in Ghana. The partial least square structural equation modeling approach is used to analyze the data to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results obtained from the analysis indicate that GLMPS positively influence social sustainability and environmental sustainability. However, GLMPS negatively influence business performance. The results further reveal that logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability augment GLMPS to achieve significant improvement in both business performance and environmental sustainability through the mediation effect approach.

Originality/value

The study proposes a conceptual framework that tests the combined effect of GLMPs, logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability on environmental sustainability, social sustainability and business performance from the Ghanaian perspective.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Gawon Yun, Mehmet G. Yalcin, Douglas N. Hales and Hee Yoon Kwon

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the research conducted among the interim, dyadic interactions that bridge the stand-alone measures of economic, environmental and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the research conducted among the interim, dyadic interactions that bridge the stand-alone measures of economic, environmental and social performance and the level of sustainability, as suggested in the Carter and Rogers (2008) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a systematic literature review based on the Tranfield et al. (2003) method of the articles published in 13 major journals in the area of supply chain management between the years 2010 and 2016. Results were analyzed using an expert panel.

Findings

The area of research between environmental and social performance is sparse and relegated to empirical investigation. As an important area of interaction, this area needs more research to answer the how and why questions. The economic activity seems to be the persistent theme among the interactions.

Research limitations/implications

The literature on the “environmental performance and social performance (ES)” interactions is lacking in both theoretical and analytical content. Studies explaining the motivations, optimal levels and context that drive these interactions are needed. The extant research portrays economic performance as if it cannot be sacrificed for social welfare. This approach is not in line with the progressive view of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) but instead the binary view with an economic emphasis.

Practical implications

To improve sustainability, organizations need the triple bottom line (TBL) framework that defines sustainability in isolation. However, they also need to understand how and why these interactions take place that drive sustainability in organizations.

Originality/value

By examining the literature specifically dedicated to the essential, interim, dyadic interactions, this study contributes to bridging the gap between stand-alone performance and the TBL that creates true sustainability. It also shows how the literature views the existence of sustainability is progressive, but many describe sustainability as binary. It is possible that economic sustainability is binary, and progressive characterizations of SSCM could be the reason behind the results favoring economic performance over environmental and social.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Vivek Roy, Parikshit Charan, Tobias Schoenherr and B.S. Sahay

The purpose of this paper is to explore and further explain the phenomena of supplier participation in addressing the sustainability-oriented objectives of a supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and further explain the phenomena of supplier participation in addressing the sustainability-oriented objectives of a supply chain. Specifically, the paper explains how a buyer can integrate sustainability concerns among its suppliers. The study is based in the context of the Indian school feeding (mid-day meal) program and approaches the issue from the perspective of a mid-day meal provider.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first explains how the mid-day meal providers in India explicitly address the social and economic dimensions of sustainability. Thereby, it conducts an exploratory case study on a renowned meal provider with the objective to understand the nature of its efforts toward supplier participation through in-depth interviews.

Findings

As evident in the case, from the buyer’s perspective, the key to success in winning supplier participation in addressing the sustainability-oriented supply chain objectives largely revolves around efforts along the critical aspects of policy development, policy implementation, and intent building with suppliers.

Originality/value

This paper propagates a threefold value by outlining the central importance of the focus on efforts and challenges for understanding supplier participation in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). First, the paper is among the initial studies to focus on ground-level efforts and challenges for a mid-day meal provider, and outlines best practices. Second, the case presents revelatory insights on SSCM from the perspective of supplier participation. For example, it demonstrates the relevance of supply-chain-based social identification in governing supplier willingness to participate in a buyer’s SSCM. Third, the findings also extend critical implications toward SSCM theory and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Joseph P. Guiltinan

When firms offer consumers a choice of price‐quality levels – the “good‐better‐best” choice – a challenge for managers is how to set price differentials. This article…

Abstract

When firms offer consumers a choice of price‐quality levels – the “good‐better‐best” choice – a challenge for managers is how to set price differentials. This article examines how consumer preferences across such price tiers are influenced by non‐price cues about quality. The results suggest that the pattern of preferences observed across price‐tiers can be influenced by: how quality cues (as well as price levels) are framed; the distribution of various price‐quality tradeoff strategies across potential buyers; and the degree of perceived quality variability within the product category. Specifically, the use of ratio‐scaled cues is most likely to impact “trading‐up” behavior when there are a large number of consumers who exhibit “best value‐seeking” behavior in a market.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

C. Fotopoulos and A. Krystallis

The present study attempts to offer more insights into the Greek organic market. It examines the organic products as “eco‐products”, suitable for “green” consumers…

Abstract

The present study attempts to offer more insights into the Greek organic market. It examines the organic products as “eco‐products”, suitable for “green” consumers, conscious in matters of ecology‐environment, who follow a wider health and quality‐sensitive stance of life. Analyzing a countrywide sample, the survey concludes that three consumer types exist in terms of attitude towards, purchase intention and awareness of organic products: the “unaware”, the “aware non‐users”, and the “aware users” (or simply users) of organic food products. After developing a detailed profile of the other two, the “aware non‐users” type is segmented in terms of five groups of personality and behavioral factors defined in the international literature as the driving forces of organic purchase. Then, organic products’ rejection reasons and potential organic buyer segments are revealed and their profile is fully described.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Ada Leung, Huimin Xu, Gavin Jiayun Wu and Kyle W. Luthans

This paper aims to examine a type of interorganizational learning called Industry Peer Networks (IPNs), in which a network of non-competing small businesses cooperates to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine a type of interorganizational learning called Industry Peer Networks (IPNs), in which a network of non-competing small businesses cooperates to improve their skills and to stay abreast of the industry trends, so that the firms remain competitive in the local and regional markets. The key characteristic of an IPN is the regular gathering of peers in small groups (typically 20 or fewer carefully selected members) in an atmosphere of significant trust, guided by a facilitator, to participate in a series of formal and informal activities through established guidelines, to share knowledge about management and marketing, exchange information about industry trends beyond their core markets, discuss issues related to company performance and provide constructive criticism about peer companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research on the context included visits to 13 peer meetings, three workshops for peer members, seven semi-structured interviews with members and many communications with the founder, chairman, committee chairpersons and several facilitators of peer meetings that spanned across five years. Data collection and analysis followed grounded theory building techniques.

Findings

The authors identified both cooperative and competitive learning practices that a small business could carry out to grow from a novice to an expert IPN peer member. The cooperative elements such as peer discussions, disclosure of financial data and exposure to various business models allow member firms to learn vicariously through the successes and/or failure of their peers. At the same time, the competitive elements such as service delivery critiques, business performance benchmarking and firm ranking also prompt the members to focus on execution, to emphasize accountability and to strive for status in the network. The IPN in this research has also built network legitimacy over time, and it has sustained a viable administrative entity that has a recognizable form and structure, whose functions are to strategically manage network activities and network growth to attract like-minded new members.

Research limitations/implications

First, because this research focused on fleshing out the transformative practices engaged by IPN peers, it necessarily neglected other types of network relationships that affect the small businesses, including local competitors, vendors and customers. Second, the small employment size of these firms and the personal nature of network ties in the IPN may provide an especially fertile ground for network learning that might not exist for larger firms. Third, the technology-intensive and quality-sensitive nature of IT firms may make technological trend sensitization and operating efficiency more competitive advantages in this industry than in others. Finally, although participation in IPN is associated with higher level of perceived learning, the relationship between learning and business performance is not yet articulated empirically.

Practical implications

The study contributes to the understanding of cooperative/competitive transformative practices in the IPN by highlighting the defining features at each transformation stage, from firms being isolated entities which react to market forces to connected peers which proactively drive the markets. IPNs are most effective for business owners who are at their early growth stage, in which they are positioned to grow further. Nevertheless, the authors also present the paradoxical capacity of IPNs to propel firms along trajectories of empowerment or disengagement.

Social implications

As 78.5 per cent of the US firms are small businesses having fewer than 10 employees, the knowledge of firm and IPN transformation is important for both researchers and advocates of small businesses to understand the roots of success or failure of firms and the IPNs in which they are embedded.

Originality/value

Earlier research has not explored the network-level effects as part of a full array of outcomes. Instead, research involving IPNs has focused primarily on the motivation and immediate firm-level outcomes of IPNs. Research to this point has also failed to examine IPNs from a developmental perspective, how the firms and the IPN as a network transform over time.

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