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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Daniele Morselli and Andrea Mattia Marcelli

This contribution investigates methodological questions concerning Change Laboratory interventions. It contemplates the research questions: To what extent the Change…

Abstract

Purpose

This contribution investigates methodological questions concerning Change Laboratory interventions. It contemplates the research questions: To what extent the Change Laboratory can be situated within the panorama of qualitative inquiry? If so, to what extent can the methods and strategies of inquiry help improve a Change Laboratory intervention?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the first question, this paper makes an overview on key terms of qualitative research; subsequently, it presents the characterising features of the Change Laboratory. Then, it takes a historical perspective and compares the Change Laboratory firstly against action research, and secondly with design experiments. To answer the second section, it examines a case study of Change Laboratory with teachers that the first author facilitated. Next, it displays how trustworthiness was ensured through a thick description and member checks.

Findings

The paper argues that the Change Laboratory is a strategy of inquiry; it aligns with the characteristics of qualitative research, and it follows the agenda of a participative paradigm. Furthermore, the methods and strategies of inquiry such as thick descriptions and member checks, not only can improve rigour and validity of the intervention but also strengthen the outcomes of the Change Laboratory itself.

Originality/value

The Change Laboratory is well defined as a formative method, but not fully understood as an investigative method. Although scholars discussed methodological issues of Cultural Historical Activity Theory in diverse articles, the relationship between the Change Laboratory and qualitative inquiry has remained unclear.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-651-9

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Dennis James Foster, Terrence Hays and Frances Alter

This paper aims to assist researchers considering the benefits and constraints of re‐using previously collected data (sourced from media in the public domain) as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assist researchers considering the benefits and constraints of re‐using previously collected data (sourced from media in the public domain) as the sample for a grounded theory qualitative research inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies what were perceived by the researchers as methodological challenges, encountered in the context of a study using grounded theory methodology. The seven areas included: the re‐use of qualitative data, forming the research question, developing the research approach, refining the methodology, ensuring data quality, maintaining methodological integrity, and developing ethical boundaries. It outlines the process of working through these challenges and explains the solutions adopted throughout the course of the research project.

Findings

The findings from this study indicate that while re‐using data can be perceived as a constraint in qualitative research, what is not adequately taken into consideration is the actual quality of the archival material that forms the body of collected data. The researchers also illustrate the benefits of using rich archival material in the context of a single research project and caution that the re‐use of previously collected data is not a soft option, nor does it offer a fast track to completion.

Research limitations/implications

Solutions to challenges described in the article may not be immediately applicable to other research contexts or archives of data.

Practical implications

Researchers can adopt approaches similar to those outlined in the paper to assess the applicability of archives of previously‐collected qualitative data as the sample for complementary or supplementary research.

Originality/value

The paper presents solutions to seven commonly perceived challenges to the re‐use of previously collected data as the sample for qualitative research.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Kiara S. Summerville, Erica T. Campbell, Krystal Flantroy, Ashley Nicole Prowell and Stephanie Anne Shelton

Qualitative research consistently centers Eurocentrism through courses' integrations of ontological, epistemological and axiological perspectives. This literal…

Abstract

Purpose

Qualitative research consistently centers Eurocentrism through courses' integrations of ontological, epistemological and axiological perspectives. This literal whitewashing was a source of great frustration and confusion for the authors, four Black women, who found their identities omitted and disregarded in qualitative inquiry. Using Collins' outsider-within concept and collective narratives to center their experiences, the authors seek through their writing to actively repurpose and re-engage with qualitative scholarship that generally seeks to exclude Black women.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically informed by Collins' outsider-within concept, the authors use Deleuze and Parnet's collective biography to tell the stories of four Black doctoral students negotiating race, gender, class and intellectual identity, while critiquing Eurocentric theory, through coursework. The collaborative writing process provided shared space for the engagement of individual thoughts and experiences with(in) others' narratives.

Findings

Black women can interpret qualitative inquiry outside of the Eurocentric norm, and qualitative courses can provide spaces for them to do so by repositioning Black women philosophers as central to understanding qualitative inquiry.

Originality/value

Through collective biography (Deleuze and Parnet, 2007), this paper centers the voices of four Black women scholars who use a creative writing approach to think with/through theory as Black women (Jackson and Mazzei, 2012). The paper offers new discussions of and ways in which qualitative researchers might decolonize Eurocentric ways of knowing in qualitative inquiry and qualitative pedagogy from students' perspectives.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Harry Torrance

The chapter reports the author's early reading of Norman Denzin's work in symbolic interactionism, and Denzin's impact on research training in social science in the United…

Abstract

The chapter reports the author's early reading of Norman Denzin's work in symbolic interactionism, and Denzin's impact on research training in social science in the United Kingdom. The chapter reflects on Denzin's impact on the field of educational research in particular. The chapter then reflects on working with Denzin and particularly Denzin's leadership of the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (ICQI) and its role in energizing and organizing the international qualitative inquiry community – the creation of Denzin's “bigger tent.”

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Sheila Keegan

The purpose of this paper is to address the emerging way in which qualitative research is now carried out within the commercial world, the influences of shifting paradigms…

2375

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the emerging way in which qualitative research is now carried out within the commercial world, the influences of shifting paradigms and the importance of theoretical understanding for current practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The “method” underpinning this paper is qualitative observation drawn from research across a wide range of client companies during more than 30 years of commercial qualitative practice, as well as from recent, ongoing conversations with other commercial practitioners and academics, and from the academic and literature.

Findings

Commercial qualitative research has, largely, moved away from a classic scientific paradigm towards a social constructionist perspective. The paper explores how the concept of emergence derived from complexity sciences and the contribution of neuroscience to understanding the role of emotion in judgement and decision making, can help make sense of current commercial practice.

Practical implications

The implications for commercial practitioners are highlighted. Training in analytical skills and emotional awareness as reflection‐in‐action is needed in order that analysis and interpretation are embedded within the ongoing research process, i.e. training needs to include qualitative thinking as much as practice.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the creative potential of “emergent inquiry”, improvisation “in the moment” and the particular skills required.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2022

Robin S. Grenier, Peter Williams and Yonjoo Cho

The purpose of this paper is to conclude this special issue on innovation in qualitative research by addressing the preceding papers in relation to the work of Human…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conclude this special issue on innovation in qualitative research by addressing the preceding papers in relation to the work of Human Resource Development (HRD) scholars and scholar-practitioners, consider the implications to the field of HRD and point to additional directions for innovative qualitative approaches. The authors use the term “innovative” to mean either an approach (or technique) that is newly conceived or one that is new to HRD (or little used).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the papers in the special issue, identified other innovative qualitative approaches from the HRD literature and described briefly additional innovative approaches from other fields to suggest future directions for HRD professionals.

Findings

In this review, the authors noted the relatively few approaches to qualitative research that have been used regularly in HRD literature and suggested further innovative approaches that could deepen the understanding of organizations, including narrative, visual and indigenous methods, among others.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides for HRD scholars an overview of a few qualitative research methodologies that are new to HRD and identifies additional approaches and epistemological challenges that could be valuable for future inquiry into complex organizations by HRD scholars and practitioners.

Practical implications

The authors suggest various feasible approaches and tools for HRD professionals to inquire into their practice in organizations to identify needs, evaluate outcomes and inquire into socially complex issues.

Originality/value

This study’s intent is to encourage the use of various innovative qualitative inquiry approaches when appropriate to understand and transform organizations. In particular, this study encourages the approaches that center the voices and experiences of those being studied and emphasizes the ways of listening to voices from the margins that may have been ignored previously.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Mitchell Allen

Like the hero of the 1946 Capra movie It's a Wonderful Life, Norman Denzin has been a builder of his local community. While much attention has been paid to his…

Abstract

Like the hero of the 1946 Capra movie It's a Wonderful Life, Norman Denzin has been a builder of his local community. While much attention has been paid to his intellectual contributions on methods and in several substantive areas, possibly his greatest accomplishments have been in the area of building and fostering a robust, international, multidisciplinary qualitative research community. This chapter explores some of these contributions, focusing on Denzin's leadership in creating the Handbook of Qualitative Research, the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, and eight different journals or book series for which he serves as editor or coeditor. Through these channels, he has fostered the work of younger scholars, of marginalized groups, and of qualitative communities throughout the world, and supported innovative directions in qualitative theory and practice.

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Yonjoo Cho, Robin Grenier and Peter Williams

The purpose of this paper is to offer a collection of articles that explore some of the many innovative approaches to qualitative inquiry and to challenge HRD scholars and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a collection of articles that explore some of the many innovative approaches to qualitative inquiry and to challenge HRD scholars and practitioners to consider using innovative approaches in their work. In doing so, qualitative research in HRD can better capture and honour voices, experiences and meaning making of individuals, teams, organizations and communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Lê and Schmid’s (2022) definition of innovation in qualitative research, the authors selected four innovative approaches to qualitative research that have the potential to enhance HRD research and practice: use of multiple-case study designs in case study research in HRD, a new take on critical incident technique, a narrative approach of testimonio and a visual approach of participant photography.

Findings

Innovative approaches to qualitative research in this special issue include a review of case study research in HRD by Tkachenko et al., a new take on the familiar critical incident technique of Watkins et al., a narrative approach to testimonio by Salcedo et al. and a visual approach to participant photography by Hurtienne et al. The last article, by Grenier et al., addresses the implications of these articles to the field of HRD and points to additional directions for innovative qualitative approaches that can help to understand and create more inclusive, democratic and just organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The articles in this special issue are intended to spark a dialogue about the meaning of innovation in qualitative research in HRD. It also can serve as an impetus for considering how innovative approaches to qualitative research can better tackle questions that come from the new normal of the workplace, society and diverse contexts.

Practical implications

This special issue will give HRD scholars and practitioners a realistic, practical view on how innovation in qualitative research can help in exploring specific problems in the workplace. The articles will offer a glimpse into how specific social complex issues can be explored and addressed through innovative approaches, new and tried/modified, to qualitative inquiry.

Originality/value

Four articles introduce new and tried/modified qualitative methods, and their value is in prompting HRD scholars and practitioners to consider some of the innovative approaches in exploring, understanding and transforming the workplace. The final article is a review of more innovative qualitative approaches for HRD scholars and practitioners to understand complex organizational phenomena and promote positive and inclusive change accordingly.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Empirical Nursing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-814-9

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