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Article

Sharon Loane, Jim Bell and Rod McNaughton

Extant international marketing enquiry has been widely criticised for lacking scope and ambition. Typically, empirical investigations have involved single market studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant international marketing enquiry has been widely criticised for lacking scope and ambition. Typically, empirical investigations have involved single market studies employing quantitative methods and survey techniques. Consequently, researchers have been challenged to embrace greater methodological pluralism and broaden their geographical perspectives. This contribution posits that new information communication technologies (ICT), particularly the internet, can significantly improve the robustness of qualitative and mixed‐method international marketing research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes and evaluates the application of ICT in a recent cross‐national enquiry into rapidly internationalising small firms. Online sources were used to gather information on 218 internationalising small firms, in Australia, Canada, Ireland and New Zealand. An e‐mail instrument was then administered to verify this data and address information gaps, resulting in 143 usable responses, evenly distributed across locations. Key emerging themes were identified and a representative sub‐sample of 53 firms was selected for further in‐depth investigation via face‐to‐face interviews with CEOs.

Findings

The authors contend that such technologies can help to refine sample identification and selection procedures, improve response rates and encourage greater respondent “buy‐in” to depth interviews. They also lead to much more targeted lines of enquiry during depth interviews by identifying key research themes and issues, thus enhancing the depth and richness of the insights obtained.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that novel ICT‐enabled research approaches as described herein are particularly effective because, compared to conventional survey methods, they are more user friendly and better received by subjects.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Martin Wood and Sally Brown

Inspired by an exciting revival of interest in the working methods and processes of the creative arts, the purpose of this paper is to make use of the auteur approach to…

Abstract

Purpose

Inspired by an exciting revival of interest in the working methods and processes of the creative arts, the purpose of this paper is to make use of the auteur approach to film production, to further develop knowledge about sensuous methodologies in qualitative research.

Design/methodology/approach

An exegesis of the authors’ particular experiences in producing and disseminating a short documentary film is used to construct a framework from which to analyse affective modes of engagement within the parameters of qualitative research.

Findings

Qualitative researchers are characterised as creative artists who bring their precise aesthetic choice to bear on an audience through a mix of technical competence, distinguishable personality and interior meaning.

Practical implications

One way for qualitative research to have affective impact is to use the working methods and procedures of the creative arts.

Social implications

A research culture is required where risk is permissible and engagement with the creative arts is given greater recognition in future qualitative projects.

Originality/value

As a mode of creative arts enquiry, film making can allow a degree of the emotional meaning and feeling within a study to come through into the analysis and the viewer's/reader's affective experience. This is often difficult to come by in more scientifically‐driven research approaches.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article

Kenneth F. Hyde

States that there are two general approaches to reasoning which may result in the acquisition of new knowledge: inductive reasoning commences with observation of specific…

Abstract

States that there are two general approaches to reasoning which may result in the acquisition of new knowledge: inductive reasoning commences with observation of specific instances, and seeks to establish generalisations; deductive reasoning commences with generalisations, and seeks to see if these generalisations apply to specific instances. Most often, qualitative research follows an inductive process. In most instances, however, theory developed from qualitative investigation is untested theory. Both quantitative and qualitative researchers demonstrate deductive and inductive processes in their research, but fail to recognise these processes. The research paradigm followed in this article is a post‐positivist (“realist”) one. This is not incompatible with the use of qualitative research methods. Argues that the adoption of formal deductive procedures can represent an important step for assuring conviction in qualitative research findings. Discusses how, and under what circumstances, qualitative researchers might adopt formal deductive procedures in their research. One approach, theory testing by “pattern matching”, is illustrated with a sample application.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article

Christina Goulding

The paper aims to look at some of the problems commonly associated with qualitative methodologies, suggesting that there is a need for a more rigorous application in order…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to look at some of the problems commonly associated with qualitative methodologies, suggesting that there is a need for a more rigorous application in order to develop theory and aid effective decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines three qualitative methodologies: grounded theory, ethnography, and phenomenology. It compares and contrasts their approaches to data collection and interpretation and highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses associated with each one.

Findings

The paper suggests that, while qualitative methodologies, as opposed to qualitative methods, are now an accepted feature of consumer research, their application in the truest sense is still in its infancy within the broader field of marketing. It proposes a number of possible contexts that may benefit from in‐depth qualitative enquiry.

Originality/value

The paper should be of interest to marketers considering adopting a qualitative perspective, possibly for the first time, as it offers a snap‐shot of three widely‐used methodologies, their associated procedures and potential pitfalls.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Neil Towers and Rong Chen

Social scientists have developed a number of ontological paradigms, including realism to describe their own perspective of the worldview under investigation where each is…

Abstract

Purpose

Social scientists have developed a number of ontological paradigms, including realism to describe their own perspective of the worldview under investigation where each is linked to an epistemology that deals with how the world is perceived and the relationship between the researcher and the known view. This paper aims to propose the use of a Participative phemenological paradigm in qualitative research for an empirical inquiry to compare developed theory to practise.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the epistemological belief elements of deductive, inductive and abductive paradigms applied to supply chain and distribution management research. It develops the participative approach, derived from realism as a valid methodology for gaining a greater understanding of the applied management subject area.

Findings

This paper addresses the validity of the participative paradigm in phemenological social science research, suggesting it is a valid and rigorous research activity to gain greater knowledge and understanding in these subject areas.

Practical implications

Contemporary global supply chain and distribution management issues have been addressed from a detailed understanding and comprehension of the dynamic and responsive fashion textiles sector. The participative paradigm, which sees human beings as co‐creating their reality through participation such as their experience, imagination, intuition, thinking and action can contribute to a better understanding of influencing factors.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the development of qualitative research in supply chain and distribution management. It has extended the theory‐based epistemological discussion to gain validity of this adopted approach.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Catherine Cassell and Gillian Symon

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the new journal and outline the rationale and aims and objectives of Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the new journal and outline the rationale and aims and objectives of Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal (QROM).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers why there is a necessity for a journal like QROM, outlines the scope of the new journal, and introduces the articles in the first issue. An invitation for further contributions to the journal is also given.

Findings

There is still a need for an outlet that both provides a showcase for the diverse range of qualitative techniques in use and promotes high quality qualitative research.

Originality/value

This paper is of use to those new readers of the journal, and those who wish to submit to the journal, in that it clearly outlines editorial policy and processes.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article

Dilanthi Amaratunga, David Baldry, Marjan Sarshar and Rita Newton

Built environment research consists of cognitive and affective, as well as behavioural, components. Existing built environment research utilises either strong qualitative

Abstract

Built environment research consists of cognitive and affective, as well as behavioural, components. Existing built environment research utilises either strong qualitative or, more often, strong quantitative methodologies. Aims to discuss some of the philosophical issues that would be considered when undertaking academic research into the built environment. Considers the available research options or paradigms and suggests ways in which a researcher can make an informed and sensible decision as to how to proceed. The main dimensions of the debate about the relative characteristics and merits of quantitative and qualitative methodology are outlined, developing the argument that the use of a single methodology often fails to explore all of these components. The use of a mixed methods approach is suggested to counteract this weakness and to enhance research into the built environment.

Details

Work Study, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Abstract

Details

Empirical Nursing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-814-9

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Article

Isobel Cunningham, Sharon Loane and Pat Ibbotson

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

Design/methodology/approach

This enquiry adopts a qualitative approach, whereby firms were identified from online searches, and secondary information was sought on each firm prior to in‐depth interview, in order to highlight the issues relating to internationalisation/growth.

Findings

The paper provides evidence that small games development firms undertake rapid internationalisation, despite resource constraints. Firms were founded by teams of entrepreneurs who unlike many other international entrepreneurs, did not have a priori experience, sometimes moving from being hobbyists into commercial operations. These often exist in a pre‐natal phase some years before formal incorporation, an important phase when many of the resources required are sourced. The findings show only partial support for RBV, as these firms were acquiring and controlling resources from their environment on a freelance and low commitment basis. The authors speculate that these firms display dynamic capabilities of the highest order in order to do so.

Research/limitations/implications

This enquiry adds to understanding of the (international) growth strategies of small games development firms, and gives insight into how they access dynamic capabilities. However, the number of firms investigated is small and from two Eastern European countries, therefore further larger scale research should be undertaken.

Originality/value

Based on this exploration new insights are developed with regard to an under researched sector, and how such firms undertake rapid internationational growth, despite being particularly resource constrained. In particular, the entrpreneurs in these firms have little experience and creatively acquire and control resources in order to grow rapidly. The authors speculate that they display advanced dynamic capabilities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Peter Lugosi

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise and examine the processes through which abstract concepts, or abstractions, can be utilised in co-creating knowledge within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise and examine the processes through which abstract concepts, or abstractions, can be utilised in co-creating knowledge within “impact-focussed” organisational and business research, i.e. applied research that primarily seeks to promote change in practice rather than principally aiming to make theoretical contributions to academic debates. The paper uses the abstraction “hospitality” as an empirical example and discusses the techniques used to “operationalise” this concept, i.e. make it understandable for research participants enabling researchers to use it within data generation and the creation of practical insights in organisational enquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed two methods: first, participant-generated photos; and second, two interactive workshops with 38 practitioners where the abstract concept “hospitality” was used to generate practical organisational insights.

Findings

The paper distinguishes between four stages: the elaboration of abstraction, concretisation of abstraction, probing perspectives on abstraction and exploring experiences of abstraction. It is argued that utilising specific techniques within these four stages facilitates: recognisability: the extent to which organisational stakeholders understand the content and meanings of the abstraction; and relatability: the extent to which stakeholders appreciate how the abstract concepts are relevant to interpreting their own practices and experiences.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study, used to develop and refine elicitation techniques, rather than to draw definitive conclusions about the applicability of specific abstract concepts. Nevertheless, reflecting on the processes and techniques used in the utilisation of abstractions here can help to operationalise them in future impact-focussed research.

Originality/value

The paper conceptualises the processes through which abstract concepts can be made apprehendable for non-specialist, non-academic practitioners. In doing so, it discusses how various elicitation techniques support the utilisation of abstractions in generating insights that can support the development of constructive, context-specific practices in organisations and businesses.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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