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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Priya Sharma, Qiyuan Li and Susan M. Land

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices around specific interests or affinities. The purpose of this study is to extend what is known about highly active/key actors in online affinity spaces, especially the ways in which they sustain and contribute to knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed 514 discussion posts gathered from an online affinity space on disease management. This study used a variety of methods to answer the research questions: the authors used discourse analyses to examine the conversations in the online affinity space, social network analyses to identify the structure of participation in the space and association rule mining and sentiment analysis to identify co-occurrence of discourse codes and sentiment of the discussions.

Findings

The results indicate that the quality and type of discourse varies considerably between key and other actors. Key actors’ discourse in the network serves to elaborate on and explain ideas and concepts, whereas other actors provide a more supportive role and engage primarily in storytelling.

Originality/value

This work extends what is known about informal mentoring and the role of key actors within affinity spaces by identifying specific discourse types and types of knowledge sharing that are characteristic of key actors. Also, this study provides an example of the use of a combination of rule mining association and sentiment analysis to characterize the nature of the affinity space.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Qiyuan Zhang, Jason Lu Jin and Defeng Yang

Given the pivotal influence of institutional forces, an important yet underexplored question in supply chain management literature is how contractual and relational…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the pivotal influence of institutional forces, an important yet underexplored question in supply chain management literature is how contractual and relational governance jointly affect supplier performance under weak legislative environments. This study tends to solve the debate by distinguishing contractual definability from contractual enforceability and by considering the contingent role of legal development in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a combined dataset of secondary data and a survey of 224 buyer–supplier dyads in China, this study examines how contractual definability and contractual enforceability interact with relational governance differently in driving supplier performance, and assesses the contingent role of legal development.

Findings

This study finds that contractual definability complements yet contractual enforceability substitutes relational governance in affecting supplier performance. Moreover, legal development weakens the complementary effect but strengthens the substitutive effect.

Originality/value

The study firstly enriches supply chain management literature by classifying the roles of contracts into contractual definability and contractual enforceability and showing their differential interplay with relational governance. Second, the study contributes to the complements–substitutes debate by revealing the shifting role of legal development. Third, the research enriches the understanding of supply chain management in the Chinese market.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Baofeng Huo, Min Tian, Yu Tian and Qiyuan Zhang

Power is central to inter-organizational relationships. The literature distinguishes between structural power (i.e. dependence) and behavioral power (i.e. use of power)…

Abstract

Purpose

Power is central to inter-organizational relationships. The literature distinguishes between structural power (i.e. dependence) and behavioral power (i.e. use of power), yet few studies considered them simultaneously. Opportunism is generally linked to use of power, but it remains unclear whether use of power deters or invites opportunism. In this study, the authors treat dependence as a driver of use of power and opportunism as its outcome, and empirically test relationships among dependence, power, and opportunism from both buyer and supplier perspectives. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines how buyer and supplier dependence influence the other’s and their own use of coercive and non-coercive power, which lead to opportunism of two parties, based on data from 240 companies in China on their perceived relationships with major suppliers.

Findings

Results show that buyer/supplier dependence is positively related to supplier’s/buyer’s use of coercive and non-coercive power. Buyer’s and supplier’s use of coercive power also positively influences their opportunism. Buyer’s use of non-coercive power is negatively related to both partners’ opportunism, whereas supplier’s use of non-coercive power is not significantly related to either partner’s opportunism.

Originality/value

This study contributes to literature in two ways. First, the authors distinguish the structural aspect of power from its behavioral aspect and demonstrate that dependence, which represents structural power, generates different patterns of influence on use of coercive and non-coercive power when considered from buyer’s and supplier’s perspectives. Second, the authors reexamine relationships between use of power and opportunism and show that buyers and suppliers react differently to use of different types of power.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Michèle E.M. Akoorie and Qiang Ding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development and characteristics of industrial clusters in the province of Zhejiang, China with particular emphasis on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development and characteristics of industrial clusters in the province of Zhejiang, China with particular emphasis on the hosiery industry in the town of Datang.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used case study methodology and data triangulation techniques based on archival research and reports of statistical agencies both at central and local government level.

Findings

Industry clusters assist in regional economic development by increasing local competitive advantages and creating an industrial regional identity through specialisation which attracts resources, labour and capital for investment. The industrial cluster in Datang has been stimulated by the local entrepreneurial climate, effective local networks and support from local government.

Practical implications

The hosiery industrial cluster in Datang is in a less‐developed rural region characterised by low‐level labour intensive industrial activity. Their ability to compete internationally is hampered by low levels of innovation. The global networks are controlled by buyers of product. Design and/or innovation capability could be improved by developing strategic alliances with Italian producers in the same industry.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to our understanding of the problems facing industrial clusters in provincial China which, as yet are unable to match the design and branding capabilities achieved by clusters in similar industries in Castel Goffredo (Italy) where outstanding design and branding have enabled them to build a dominant position in the European market in higher added‐value products.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Leming Hu

The relationship between government and market is the key to the economic development performance of market economy countries. Due to the limits such as the state/market…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between government and market is the key to the economic development performance of market economy countries. Due to the limits such as the state/market dichotomy, the focus on static allocation efficiency and the ignorance of the diversity of the market economy and the relationship between government and market, economic liberalism and state interventionism can hardly position and explain the role and evolution of government and market in the real world accurately.

Design/methodology/approach

China’s economic transition has always adhered to the reform direction of the socialist market economy and the development goal of a modern socialist country as well as the symbiosis and positive and progressive evolution of government and market, blazing a “third way” in handling the relationship between government and market.

Findings

The “China’s experience” shows that the key for emerging market economies to achieve good economic development performance lies in whether they can build a new relationship of the mutual integration between and common prosperity of government and market regarding target selection, production organisation, technological innovation, institutional change and regulatory adjustment.

Originality/value

The second part of this paper analyses the inherent defects of economic liberalism and state interventionism as well as the reasons why they can hardly be adopted as the theoretical guidance for emerging market economies to handle the relationship between government and market. The third part analyses how China has transcended the inherent thinking of liberalism and interventionism and shaped the new relationship between government and market through goal-oriented, active and progressive, two-way interactive exploration and practice to ensure the success of China's economic transition.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

Keywords

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