Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Qingyan Ye, Duanxu Wang and Kai Zeng

Employee entrepreneurship has recently become an emerging area of investigation. However, due to the fragmentation of the turnover and entrepreneurship literature, no…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee entrepreneurship has recently become an emerging area of investigation. However, due to the fragmentation of the turnover and entrepreneurship literature, no coherent theoretical framework has been developed to provide an adequate description of the employee entrepreneurial process. The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of why and how an employee in an established organization progresses toward starting a new venture by exploring the key decision-making processes during the initial stages of employee entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study addresses the following research questions: What are the key decision-making processes during the initial stages of employee entrepreneurship? How are these decisions made, and how do they interact? This study employed a multiple case study approach, which enabled the authors to gain valuable insight into these “what” and “how” questions. The data consist of 28 in-depth employee entrepreneurship cases.

Findings

Based on an in-depth study of 28 cases, this study constructs a comprehensive model of the dynamic and interactive decision-making processes that lead to employee entrepreneurship. In particular, the findings reveal that rather than being a linear staged activity, employee entrepreneurship is an inherently iterative process that involves a set of interrelated subdecision-making processes related to turnover, team entrepreneurship and partner recruitment that entail multiple iterations and feedback loops based on an individual's cognitive judgment.

Originality/value

By illustrating and clarifying the importance of the effects of different initial motivations and the attributes of the network in the course of the employee entrepreneurship decision-making process, this study integrates the turnover and entrepreneurship literature and makes significant contributions to the current literature on employee entrepreneurship. Moreover, this study complements research investigating entrepreneurial team formation by providing a detailed understanding of how the lead entrepreneur and the prospective partner make mutual choices during the entrepreneurial team formation process.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Kai Zeng, Duanxu Wang, Qingyan Ye, Zhengwei Li and Xianwei Zheng

Because unethical behaviour pervades in organisations, how to inhibit the interpersonal influence of unethical behaviour has become increasingly important. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Because unethical behaviour pervades in organisations, how to inhibit the interpersonal influence of unethical behaviour has become increasingly important. This study aims to integrate the deontic justice theory and affective events theory to examine the relationship between an individual’s unethical behaviour and his or her peers’ vicarious learning by highlighting the mediating effect of peers’ moral anger and the moderating effect of task interdependence on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two waves from 254 employees of a large manufacturing company in the People’s Republic of China.

Findings

The hypothesised moderated mediation model was supported. Specifically, as expected, peers’ moral anger mediated the negative relationship between an individual’s unethical behaviour and peers’ vicarious learning. Task interdependence moderated the direct relationship between the individual’s unethical behaviour and his or her peers’ moral anger and the indirect relationship between an individual’s unethical behaviour and his or her peers’ vicarious learning via the peers’ moral anger such that these relationships were stronger when the level of task interdependence was higher.

Originality/value

This study argues that the deontic justice theory is a supplement for the social learning theory in explaining the interpersonal influence of unethical behaviour. Drawing on the deontic justice theory, this study demonstrates that an individual’s unethical behaviours are unlikely to be rewarded or accepted, and by integrating the theories of deontic justice and affective events, offers a rationale for the emotional mechanism that underlies the interpersonal influence of unethical behaviour.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Qingyan Ye, Duanxu Wang and Xi Li

In today’s complex and challenging work environment, employees’ learning from errors has become critical to organizations’ survival and success. While the literature has…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s complex and challenging work environment, employees’ learning from errors has become critical to organizations’ survival and success. While the literature has highlighted the importance of inclusive leadership for learning behavior in organizations, research on how inclusive leadership promotes employees’ learning from errors has been limited. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to fill this gap by developing and testing a moderated mediation model that emphasizes the key roles of positive mood and gender in the relationship between inclusive leadership and employees’ learning from errors.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-time survey method was used in this study to collect data from 202 full-time employees working in China.

Findings

The hypothesized moderated mediation model in this study was supported. Inclusive leadership facilitated employees’ learning from errors through employees’ positive mood, and employees’ gender moderated both the direct relationship between inclusive leadership and employees’ positive mood and the indirect relationship between inclusive leadership and employees’ learning from errors through employees’ positive mood: the relationships were stronger for female employees than for male employees.

Originality/value

By incorporating the social role theory into the affective events theory framework, this study may help to open the “black box” of the relationship between inclusive leadership and employees’ learning from errors by explicating the importance of positive mood and gender, thereby shedding light on the timely issues of inclusive leadership, mood, and learning from errors in the workplace.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3