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Article

Jimmy Ghaphery

To study the use of “Quick Links”, a common navigational element, in the context of an academic library website.

Abstract

Purpose

To study the use of “Quick Links”, a common navigational element, in the context of an academic library website.

Design/methodology/approach

Transaction log files and web server logs are analyzed over a four‐year period to detect patterns in Quick Link usage.

Findings

Provides information about what Quick Links have been used over time, as well as the relationship of Quick Link usage to the rest of the library website. Finds generally that Quick Link usage is prevalent, tilted toward a few of the choices, and is drawn largely from the library homepage as referral source.

Research limitations/implications

Log analysis does not include IP referral data, which limits the ability to determine different patterns of use by specific locations including services desks, off‐campus, and in‐house library usage.

Practical implications

This paper is useful for website usability in terms of design decisions and log analysis.

Originality/value

This paper targets a specific website usability issue over time.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article

F. Wendt and Vignali

Notes the concern that the launch of a new technological product into a European market can cause to the management of a company. Suggests that a close examination of the…

Abstract

Notes the concern that the launch of a new technological product into a European market can cause to the management of a company. Suggests that a close examination of the traditional planning process and a deeper understanding of the management devices that are used in marketing can indicate a clear strategy path to the company.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Nikolai V. Ostapenko

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the fast food market and customer attitudes in Russia, and outline successful and questionable strategies of the Western fast food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the fast food market and customer attitudes in Russia, and outline successful and questionable strategies of the Western fast food companies in their attempt to penetrate the Russian market.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective has been achieved by reviewing the first Russian entry of the Belgian‐French fast food chain “Quick” by applying qualitative research method that included observational research, surveying, and interviewing customers and employees of the company both in Paris and Moscow. The topic has been approached by comparing “Quick's” strategies with the other mainly US‐based fast food chains that operate currently in Russia. The subject scope of the paper covers fast food sector development and trends under the early recession conditions of entry.

Findings

It was found that luxury or more upscale (“healthy”) positioning strategy of the new entrant “Quick” into the fast food market in Russia is not working. The company also exhibited a poor location strategy and possibly entered into an inefficient strategic alliance with the Russian partner Tashir group. Some meaningful adjustments are also required for the supply chain structure of “Quick” chain in Russia.

Originality/value

The paper is analyzing the experiences of the new entrant in Russia. It contains new ideas for the fast food sector in the country, and Russian‐foreign equity type joint ventures. This paper presents interest for the needs of the international executives and global marketing specialists.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Marcia Perry and Amrik S. Sohal

Presents a case study on quick response practices in a supply chain within the Australian textiles, clothing and footwear (TCF) industry, conducted as part of a…

Abstract

Presents a case study on quick response practices in a supply chain within the Australian textiles, clothing and footwear (TCF) industry, conducted as part of a government‐led project aimed at improving the performance of the Australian TCF industry towards becoming more internationally competitive. Details of the Australian TCF Industry Quick Response Program are provided, which comprised six major activities: assessing company commitment and readiness; formulation of supply chain clusters; roundtable meetings; workshops and seminars; implementation of quick response techniques and technologies; and audits to assess improvements. The supply chain consists of Myer/Grace Brothers (retailer), Diana Ferrari (shoe manufacturer), Burrowes (shoe components supplier), and Packer Tannery (leather supplier). The activities undertaken within this supply chain are discussed and some of the key lessons learnt from this case study are highlighted.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Simone Guercini

Quick fashion formulas can be described as a product/service characterised mainly by its potential to supply retailers with a range renewal service that is produced at…

Abstract

Quick fashion formulas can be described as a product/service characterised mainly by its potential to supply retailers with a range renewal service that is produced at short time gaps. The purpose of this paper is to examine the hypothesis that by adopting new quick fashion formulas clothing manufacturers can at least in part integrate the different factors that traditionally contributed to the success of operators in different strategic groups. In the case of the Italian firm analysed here, the range renewal service and consequently the development of a new production management model are integrated with construction of a strong brand identity, which has resulted in increased performance. The development of new quick fashion formulas appears symptomatic of transition from a production‐driven to a market‐driven characterisation of the apparel manufacturing sector. The development and success of quick fashion formulas such as those analysed in this paper may have important implications not only for the evolution of clothing distribution, but indeed for the whole supply chain upstream of the retailer, including textiles manufacturers who produce yarn and fabric.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Lu Lu and Christina Geng-qing Chi

This paper aims to explore the perceived hedonic and utilitarian value of organic dining along with its antecedents and dining outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the perceived hedonic and utilitarian value of organic dining along with its antecedents and dining outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two groups of US consumers who had recently visited a quick-service or upscale restaurant to consume organic menu items. Data were analyzed using factor analysis and hierarchical regression analyses using Hayes’ PROCESS procedure.

Findings

Perceived hedonic value has two dimensions (dining-centered excitement and social attention and escapism), as does utilitarian value (tangible value and intangible value). Involvement with organic food is a significant antecedent of perceived value. Satisfaction exhibits various mediating effects on behavioral intention, depending on the value factor considered.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to knowledge regarding the perceived dining value of consuming organic food at restaurants. Findings shed light on the importance of understanding perceived value in predicting diners’ behavioral intentions across two restaurant segments. Consumers’ value perceptions of organic dining differ from those related to general organic food shopping.

Practical implications

The findings provide clear ways for restaurants to increase the perceived utilitarian and hedonic value of organic food dishes. This study assists restaurant practitioners in managing customer satisfaction and loyalty by prioritizing the effort invested in developing different value perceptions.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first attempts to delve into consumers’ dining experiences with organic food across two major restaurant segments.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Milos Bujisic, Joe Hutchinson and H.G. Parsa

– The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationships between restaurant quality attributes and customer behavioral intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationships between restaurant quality attributes and customer behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design was chosen to provide a high level of internal validity. Three separate 3 × 2 factorial design experiments were conducted through 18 separate vignette scenarios for three levels of quality (below average, average and above average) of three common restaurant attributes (food, service and ambience) in two types of restaurants (quick service and upscale).

Findings

The results indicated that the type of restaurant moderated the relationship between restaurant service and ambience quality and customer behavioral intentions.

Practical implications

The results of this study suggest that management of quick-service and upscale restaurants should focus on food quality, but establish different resource allocation priorities with respect to service and ambience quality.

Originality/value

This study examined the linearity of the relationships between three common restaurant attributes (food, service and ambience) for three levels of quality (below average, average and above average) in two types of restaurants (quick service and upscale).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Yang Xu, EunHa Jeong, Ahmed E. Baiomy and Xiaolong Shao

This study aims to investigate consumers’ intention to use onsite restaurant interactive self-service technology (ORISST) using a modified value attitude-behavior model…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumers’ intention to use onsite restaurant interactive self-service technology (ORISST) using a modified value attitude-behavior model. To extend the understanding of how consumers’ dining value focus could influence their intention to use ORISST, this study examines the conditional indirect effects of restaurant type (quick-service vs fine-dining) within the proposed model.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was developed and distributed to randomly selected respondents in the USA. A total of 588 (quick-service: 295; fine-dining: 293) responses were used for the data analysis. Structural equation modeling with a robust maximum likelihood method was used to examine the proposed model. To investigate the moderated effects of restaurant type, a latent moderated mediation model was used.

Findings

The results showed that consumers’ value perceptions toward technology use in restaurants influenced their intention to use ORISST via both hedonic and utilitarian expectations. Latent moderated mediation analyzes revealed that the mediation effect of hedonic expectation between perceived value and the intention was stronger in fine-dining than in quick-service restaurants.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of consumer intentions to use interactive self-service technology in restaurants by building on a model that is customer-oriented instead of tech-specific. Furthermore, the conditional effects of restaurant type are investigated using the latent moderated structural equation method. The findings of this study provide guidelines for managers of quick-service and fine-dining restaurants to better incorporate ORISST in their restaurants, to boost customer experiences and to increase operational efficiency.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Juha‐Matti Lehtonen, Jan Holmström and Jonas Slotte

Studies the problem of producing a product range with high customer service in the implosive industries. In the implosive industries a wide range of end products are…

Abstract

Studies the problem of producing a product range with high customer service in the implosive industries. In the implosive industries a wide range of end products are manufactured from a limited number of standard materials. The problem of producing a product range with high customer service is studied within the framework of product range, capacity and customer acceptable lead time. In the existing just‐in‐time literature, strong emphasis is put on set‐up and through‐put time reduction for achieving high product availability with low cost. However, the decision regarding the product range and its implications on production control is not adequately considered. It is proposed that the relevant time scope to consider demand and capacity is the product range cycle. Three cases from the food and paper industry are studied. The cases indicate constraints for achieving quick response capability.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article

P. Childerhouse and D.R. Towill

This paper aims to provide an answer to the important question of how can accurate assessment of supply chain practice and performance be conducted? By conducting audits…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an answer to the important question of how can accurate assessment of supply chain practice and performance be conducted? By conducting audits across a sample of value streams it is thereby possible to identify the components of “good practice” via evidence‐based procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

Quick scan audit methodology (QSAM) is a site‐based, team‐oriented action research‐led investigative technique for establishing meaningful “snapshots” of value stream behaviour. The participants cover both academic researchers and host organisation staff.

Findings

QSAM is found to output repeatable results enabling the transfer of technique between companies, between businesses, between market sectors, and between countries.

Research limitations/implications

Care must be taken when training new auditors and QSAM teams to ensure the required degree of consistency. There is no substitute for operating a “watch one, share one, do one” regimen.

Practical implications

The research purpose is to establish the performance vectors to enable effective value stream health comparisons to be made. Additionally “quick hits” (not “quick fixes”) may well be identified specific to an individual host organisation.

Originality/value

QSAM has already made an important contribution in enabling the gap between case‐based and survey‐based logistics research to be properly bridged.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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