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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Malte Schröder, Sebastian Schmitt and Robert Schmitt

Business processes have an open and dynamic character and are influenced by internal an external disturbances. Without an adequate use of feedback mechanisms, those…

Abstract

Purpose

Business processes have an open and dynamic character and are influenced by internal an external disturbances. Without an adequate use of feedback mechanisms, those processes become unstable and do not achieve the expected performance. The purpose of this paper is to face the challenge and to ensure a competitive quality level, a framework for entrepreneurial quality management is given.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the method of analogy formation the transfer of cybernetic approaches to business processes is shown. Especially quality control loops are analysed in order to find appropriate solutions for their design and implementation in enterprises.

Findings

As a core element of the paper an approach for the systematic implementation of control loops is given. This approach offers a framework and a description for an operative implementation of quality control loops for stable business processes.

Originality/value

The idea to use closed quality control loops for the design of several processes is already known. Anyway, both a robust framework and a appropriate, sufficient and detailed description for an operative implementation is the new aspect and an important further development within the topic.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

H. van de Water and Jan de Vries

Discusses the organization of quality management from the perspective of control. First defines an abstract control system in terms of hierarchy. Then uses this model to…

Abstract

Discusses the organization of quality management from the perspective of control. First defines an abstract control system in terms of hierarchy. Then uses this model to describe the organization of quality management in more detail. Indicates how this abstract control system can be realized in a concrete situation. Aims at making a clear distinction between the hierarchy concept in terms of control and the usual hierarchy concept as it is being used in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Binshan Lin

Management of quality control has shown a shift from aninspection‐oriented approach towards a defect‐prevention andorganisation‐focused planning process. The development…

Abstract

Management of quality control has shown a shift from an inspection‐oriented approach towards a defect‐prevention and organisation‐focused planning process. The development of a quality control information system (QCIS) should focus on management, planning and control issues. This article examines the QCIS from the aspect of its implications for management in a computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) environment.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Mahmoud M. Yasin, Ronald F. Green and Marwan Wafa

The importance of quality and statistical quality control asstrategic tools, well established in the manufacturing community, hasrecently been extended to the service…

Abstract

The importance of quality and statistical quality control as strategic tools, well established in the manufacturing community, has recently been extended to the service sector. The application of statistical quality control techniques within the banking industry is discussed. Recommendations for establishing a quality control programme within a typical banking service environment are provided.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Subimal Chatterjee, Debi P. Mishra, Jennifer JooYeon Lee and Sirajul A. Shibly

Service providers often recommend unnecessary and expensive services to unsuspecting consumers, such as recommending a new part when a simple fix to the old will do, a…

Abstract

Purpose

Service providers often recommend unnecessary and expensive services to unsuspecting consumers, such as recommending a new part when a simple fix to the old will do, a phenomenon known as overprovisioning. The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent consumers tend to defer their decisions should they suspect that sellers are overproviding services to them and they cannot prevent the sellers from doing so (they lack personal control); and how proper market signals can mitigate such suspicions, restore personal control and reduce deferrals.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducts three laboratory experiments. The experiments expose the participants to hypothetical repair scenarios and measure to what extent they suspect that sellers might be overproviding services to them and they feel that they lack the personal control to prevent the sellers from doing so. Thereafter, the experiments expose them to two different market signals, one conveying that the seller is providing quality services (a repair warranty; quality signal) and the other conveying that the seller is taking away any incentives their agents (technicians) may have to overprovide services (the technicians are paid a flat salary; quantity signal). The paper examines how these quality/quantity signals are able to reduce overprovisioning suspicions, restore personal control and reduce decision deferrals.

Findings

The paper has two main findings. First, the paper shows a mediation process at work i.e. suspecting potential overprovisioning by sellers leads consumers to defer their decisions indirectly because they feel that they lack personal control to prevent the sellers from doing so. Second, the paper shows that the quantity signal (flat salary disclosure), but not the quality signal (warranty), is able to mitigate suspicions of overprovisioning, restore personal control and reduce decision deferrals.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that although buyers may rely on quality signals to assure them of superior service, these signals do not guarantee that the quantity of service they are receiving is appropriate. Therefore, sellers will have to send a credible quality signal and a credible quantity signal to the consumers if they wish to tackle suspicions about service overprovision and service quality.

Originality/value

The paper is original in two ways. First, the paper theorizes and tests a mediation process model whereby quality/quantity signals differentially mitigate overprovisioning suspicions, restore personal control and reduce decision deferrals. Second, the paper speaks to the necessity of expanding the traditional signaling literature, designed primarily to detect poor quality hidden in the products/services of lower-quality sellers, to include detecting/solving overprovisioning often hidden in the services provided by higher-quality sellers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

H. Paul and P.S. Yan

This article presents some discussions on the role of production engineers in quality and reliability planning and control in the context of the manufacturing sector in…

Abstract

This article presents some discussions on the role of production engineers in quality and reliability planning and control in the context of the manufacturing sector in Singapore. Superior productive efficiency in manufacturing can only be achieved through effective quality control and reliability planning. To be able to compete with other and more advanced countries, Singapore has to emphasise modern manufacturing methods, like automated, computer‐integrated and flexible manufacturing systems. Therefore, concerted efforts are now being taken to train adequately skilled and professional manpower to operate and manage such manufacturing systems. The role of production engineers in operating and managing the modern manufacturing systems has thus become more important and demanding.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Florence Yean Yng Ling and Wan Theng Ang

The purpose of this paper is to identify control systems that give rise to better construction project performance; and develop and test project performance predictive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify control systems that give rise to better construction project performance; and develop and test project performance predictive models based on control systems adopted in the project.

Design/methodology/approach

Research design was questionnaire survey. Data were collected via Electronic mails. The sampling frame was Singapore-based construction firms.

Findings

In all, 16 control mechanisms are significantly correlated with project outcomes. The more important control mechanisms are: adequacy of project information to develop the project schedule; adequacy of float in the schedule; and quality of techniques used to support risk identification. Two relatively robust predictive models were constructed and validated to predict schedule and quality outcomes of construction projects. Schedule performance may be predicted by adequacy of float and stringency of criteria to select suppliers. Quality outcome is most significantly affected by competency of quality manager, rather than the hard systems adopted in the project.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations include low response rate, and subjective nature of the five-point Likert scale used to rate project outcomes and extent to which control mechanisms were adopted in the project.

Practical implications

The implication of the findings is that merely having good project management practices and adequate resources are not sufficient to achieve good project outcomes. Instead, construction projects need to have control systems in place, as they play an important role in project outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper has shown empirically that control systems affect project outcomes. They are needed not just to control the project, but also help the project to achieve good outcomes. The research designed and tested two relatively robust models to predict schedule and quality outcomes of a project. These models may be used to make an initial assessment of the project's likely outcome, based on the control systems that contractors are going to adopt.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Mustafa M. Rashid and Hossam Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to describe a generic method and tool for assessing the reliability and robustness of the product development process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a generic method and tool for assessing the reliability and robustness of the product development process.

Design/methodology/approach

By extending the integrated definition for function modelling (IDEF0)‐based modelling approach, the paper demonstrates how to calculate the effectiveness of the process and the quality of the process output based on the quality of inputs, the controls and the tools used within the process. To illustrate and validate the proposed approach, it is applied to a case study of a product development process incorporating incomplete, fuzzy and uncertain inputs and resources.

Findings

Demonstrates the effectiveness of the tool in providing a quantified assessment of the process as well as its ability to identify those critical areas which will yield a significant improvement in the outcome of the product development process.

Originality/value

The technique is a valuable tool to assess the robustness and sensitivity of the process to changes in the quality of inputs, controls and tools, and can be integrated into businesses processes and management systems, and used as a tool to support continuous business and manufacturing decisions at any point of time.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Balbir S. Dhillon

This article presents an extensive up‐to‐date list of selective references on quality circles.

Abstract

This article presents an extensive up‐to‐date list of selective references on quality circles.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2018

Ahmed Atef Oussii and Neila Boulila Taktak

This paper aims to investigate the association between internal audit function (IAF) characteristics and internal control quality.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the association between internal audit function (IAF) characteristics and internal control quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data gathered from 59 chief audit executives from Tunisian listed companies, this paper uses a regression model to examine research hypothesis related to the association between IAF characteristics and internal control quality.

Findings

The findings of the current study reveal that internal control quality is significantly and positively associated with IAF competence, internal audit quality control assurance level, follow-up process and audit committee’s involvement in reviewing the internal audit program and results.

Practical implications

The findings have significant implications for IAF wishing to enhance their effectiveness, by recognizing the impact of the IAF’s characteristics on internal control quality. The findings of this study also have significant implications for regulatory bodies who are concerned with the internal control quality, managers and audit committees who determine IAF investment, oversight IAF activities and assess internal auditors’ performance.

Originality/value

This study helps fill a gap in the extant literature where existing empirical evidence of how the IAF characteristics influences the quality of the financial reporting process in emerging markets is scant.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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