Search results

1 – 10 of 351
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Chui Ling Yeung, Chi Fai Cheung, Wai Ming Wang, Eric Tsui and Wing Bun Lee

Narratives are useful to educate novices to learn from the past in a safe environment. For some high-risk industries, narratives for lessons learnt are costly and limited…

Abstract

Purpose

Narratives are useful to educate novices to learn from the past in a safe environment. For some high-risk industries, narratives for lessons learnt are costly and limited, as they are constructed from the occurrence of accidents. This paper aims to propose a new approach to facilitate narrative generation from existing narrative sources to support training and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A computational narrative semi-fiction generation (CNSG) approach is proposed, and a case study was conducted in a statutory body in the construction industry in Hong Kong. Apart from measuring the learning outcomes gained by participants through the new narratives, domain experts were invited to evaluate the performance of the CNSG approach.

Findings

The performance of the CNSG approach is found to be effective in facilitating new narrative generation from existing narrative sources and to generate synthetic semi-fiction narratives to support and educate individuals to learn from past lessons. The new narratives generated by the CNSG approach help students learn and remember important things and learning points from the narratives. Domain experts agree that the validated narratives are useful for training and learning purposes.

Originality/value

This study presents a new narrative generation process for a high-risk industry, e.g. the construction industry. The CNSG approach incorporates the technologies of natural language processing and artificial intelligence to computationally identify narrative gaps in existing narrative sources and proposes narrative fragments to generate new semi-fiction narratives. Encouraging results were gained through the case study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Rohit Verma

This study presents an empirical snapshot of management challenges among different types of service industries (Service Factory, Service Shop, Mass Service, and…

Abstract

This study presents an empirical snapshot of management challenges among different types of service industries (Service Factory, Service Shop, Mass Service, and Professional Service). Based on data collected (sample size = 273; response rate 97.5 percent) from the managers of four services (Fast Food, Auto Repair, Retail Sales, Legal Services) we show how management challenges change with customer contact/customization and labour intensity. These results have important implications for understanding “real life” service operations, for process improvement, and for service design.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Panagiotis Liargovas, Nikolaos Apostolopoulos, Ilias Pappas and Alexandros Kakouris

The aim of this chapter is to examine the way in which small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) adapt their financial and operational planning in order to develop green…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to examine the way in which small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) adapt their financial and operational planning in order to develop green entrepreneurship. This is examined through two different practices which may be followed by companies: policies and strategies that lead enterprises to energy upgrade and policies and strategies relating to environmental protection. This chapter draws upon the dataset from 100 Greek SMEs. The process of data collection was conducted by delivering questionnaires to the sample of companies in question. The novelty of this research, in comparison with other surveys, is that the level of adopting green strategies is approached not only in the fields of energy or environmental efficiencies but also attempts to introduce techno-economic parameters with related items in the questionnaires delivered to the SMEs. Hence, a more thorough analysis for the greenness of Greek SMEs is discussed based on 10 (i.e. techno-economic) research hypotheses. The results indicate that the SMEs should be supported more effectively by the Greek government and European Union through funding initiatives. The funding initiatives do not have the expected results so far towards this direction. However, it seems that the SMEs realize the importance of green strategies as they believe the consumers are willing to pay more for green products.

Details

Green Economy in the Western Balkans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-499-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Antonietta Bonello

Abstract

Details

Understanding the Investor: A Maltese Study of Risk and Behavior in Financial Investment Decisions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-705-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Sema Kayapinar Kaya, Yasal Ozdemir and Murat Dal

The young population in Turkey is gradually increasing. Generation Y, which comprises the people born between 1980 and 1999 (Broadbridge et al., 2007) and free-spirited…

Abstract

Purpose

The young population in Turkey is gradually increasing. Generation Y, which comprises the people born between 1980 and 1999 (Broadbridge et al., 2007) and free-spirited and tech-savvy, forms a large part of the population of the world, especially Turkey, and is of great importance to the housing sector for their home-buying preferences. In this study, housing preferences of students in Turkey’s two socio-economically different universities were comparatively analysed through quantitative methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was simultaneously distributed among students of two universities. The survey consists of six main factors: “reliability”, “economic opportunities”, “transportation opportunities”, “quality of life and social opportunities”, “quality standards”, and “technological opportunities”, with 25 statements. The questionnaire was developed through a comprehensive literature review and the opinions of university stakeholders.

Findings

Results showed that the structure of the family and socio-economic differences affect home-buying preferences. The Mann–Whitney U test indicated that there was a meaningful difference of opinion between students of two universities. Munzur University students paid attention to economic opportunities when buying a home. Additionally, there was a meaningful relationship among the age groups in factors of “having a parking place” (p =0.026) and “having a playground” (p =0.026). As the age increases, students desire a playground around their future home.

Research limitations/implications

The most important limitation of this study is the non-parametric data. Non-parametric data structure and the tests performed accordingly are less preferred than parametric data structure. For that reason, to what extent the results accurately represent Generation Y needs to be assessed through future study. Also, a certain number of sampling could be reached as purposive sampling was used.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in terms of comparatively analysing buying preferences of Generation Y through statistical methods and showing the relationship between these preferences and socio-economic features statistically. Due to the insufficient quantitative research on the literature, this quantitative study was carried future home-buying preferences of Generation Y university students, who will also be actively involved in the housing market. The purpose of this study investigates marketing factors that affect housing preferences of students in Turkey.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ibrahim Abiodun Oladapo and Asmak Ab Rahman

This paper aims to examine the basic determinant factors of human development using the theory of Maqasid al Shari’ah (TMS). It also identifies relevant demographic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the basic determinant factors of human development using the theory of Maqasid al Shari’ah (TMS). It also identifies relevant demographic variables that may likely moderate the relationship among the identified factors.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth review of the TMS and human capital theory literature was conducted, with a specific attention on their impact to human development.

Findings

The extensive review of the relevant literature shows that human development is not only determined by education, health, income, human rights and social justice but also influenced by some demographic variables like educational attainment and gender composition.

Originality/value

This paper is a novel attempt whereby an extensive review on the factors of human development is conducted using TMS and identifying the narrowness in the existing framework. The paper will help researchers to better their understanding in this context. It will also provide the policymakers with adequate information on the important factors of human development with the aim to chart a comprehensive policy direction.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2015

William W. Stammerjohan, Maria A. Leach and Claire Allison Stammerjohan

This study extends the budgetary participation–performance/cultural effects literature by isolating and examining the moderating effect of one cultural dimension, power…

Abstract

Purpose

This study extends the budgetary participation–performance/cultural effects literature by isolating and examining the moderating effect of one cultural dimension, power distance, on the budgetary participation–performance relationship. Isolating the impact of power distance is important to this literature because of the fact that participative budgeting remains a possibly underutilized management tool in high power distance countries.

Methodology/approach

We regroup our multinational sample of managers by power distance level, and employ multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) and a set of nonparametric bootstrap tests to triangulate our findings.

Findings

We find that the majority of our managers from three high power distance countries (Mexico, Korea, and China) score in the lower half of the power distance scale, that there is significant correlation between participation and performance in both the high and low power distance subsamples, but that the mechanisms connecting participation to performance are quite different. While job satisfaction plays a role in connecting budgetary participation and performance among low power distance managers, job relevant information alone connects budgetary participation and performance among their high power distance counterparts.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of our work is that we not only demonstrate that budget participation can improve the performance of subordinate managers in high power distance cultures, but also provide evidence of how and why this is plausible. First managers may not share the same high power distance tendencies of their countrymen, and second, the communication aspect of budget participation appears to be more important for increased performance among those with high power distance tendencies.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-650-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Alessandra Girlando, Simon Grima, Engin Boztepe, Sharon Seychell, Ramona Rupeika-Apoga and Inna Romanova

Purpose: Risk is a multifaceted concept, and its identification requires complex approaches that are often misunderstood. The consequence is that decisions are based on…

Abstract

Purpose: Risk is a multifaceted concept, and its identification requires complex approaches that are often misunderstood. The consequence is that decisions are based on limited perception rather than the full value and meaning of what risk is, as a result, the way it is being tackled is incorrect. The individuals are often limited in their perceptions and ideas and do not embrace the full multifaceted nature of risk. Regulators and individuals want to follow norms and checklists or overuse models, simulations, and templates, thereby reducing responsibility for decision-making. At the same time, the wider use of technology and rules reduces the critical thinking of individuals. We advance the automation process by building robots that follow protocols and forget about the part of risk assessment that cannot be programed. Therefore, with this study, the objective of this study was to discover how people define risk, the influencing factors of risk perception and how they behave toward this perception. The authors also determine how the perception differed with age, gender, marital status, education level and region. The novelty of the research is related to individual risk perception during COVID-19, as this is a new and unknown phenomenon. Methodology: The research is based on the analysis of the self-administered purposely designed questionnaires we distributed across different social media platforms between February and June 2020 in Europe and in some cases was carried out as a interview over communication platforms such as “Skype,” “Zoom” and “Microsoft Teams.” The questionnaire was divided into four parts: Section 1 was designed to collect demographic information from the participants; Section 2 included risk definition statements obtained from literature and a preliminary discussion with peers; Section 3 included risk behavior statements; and Section 4 included statements on risk perception experiences. A five-point Likert Scale was provided, and participants were required to answer along a scale of “1” for “Strongly Agree” to “5” for “Strongly Disagree.” Participants also had the option to elaborate further and provide additional comments in an open-ended box provided at the end of the section. 466 valid responses were received. Thematic analysis was carried out to analyze the interviews and the open-ended questions, while the questionnaire responses were analyzed using various quantitative methods on IBM SPSS (version 23). Findings: The results of the analysis indicate that individuals evaluate the risk before making a decision and view risk as both a loss and opportunity. The study identifies nine factors influencing risk perception. Nevertheless, it must be emphasized that we can continue to develop models and rules, but as long as the risk is not understood, we will never achieve anything.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-931-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Jari Juga, Jouni Juntunen and Timo Koivumäki

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed and tested with structural equation modeling using survey data from Finland.

Findings

It is shown that attitude toward information sharing is the strongest factor contributing to the willingness to share personal health information (PHI). Trust and control serve as mediating factors between the attitude and willingness to share PHI.

Research limitations/implications

The measures of the model need further refinement to cover the various aspects of the behavioral concepts.

Practical implications

The model provides useful insights into the factors that affect the willingness for information sharing in health care and in other areas where personal information is distributed.

Social implications

Sharing of PHI for secondary purposes can offer social benefits through improvements in health-care performance.

Originality/value

A broad-scale empirical data gives a unique view of attitudes toward sharing of PHI in one national setting.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

1 – 10 of 351