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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Masaaki Kaneko and Masahiko Munechika

The purpose of this paper is to propose a extraction procedure of competitive advantage factors that a company needs to have organizational capabilities, and leads the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a extraction procedure of competitive advantage factors that a company needs to have organizational capabilities, and leads the company to make a sustainable business success. By using the proposed method, a company can conduct a self‐assessment based on the factors, and re‐design its own quality management system, then realize the competitive advantage in a target business area.

Design/methodology/approach

By collecting and analyzing the strategy data of six business areas in company A and conducting the interview to the project team in each business area for six months, the decision‐making mechanism and its pattern of the competitive advantage factors are examined, then the self‐assessment method of quality management system is proposed.

Findings

The decision‐making mechanism for competitive advantage factors is clarified. The customer value that is one of elements in the mechanism is categorized. And the analyzing method for specifying the core customer value and the organizational capability that leads customers directly to select a company's own product is established.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is in establishing a self‐assessment method that follows the concept of “evaluation design.” This means not using pre‐established evaluation criteria for all companies in all types of business, as is done in conventional research, but rather, designing criteria based on the competitive advantage factors in a target business area and then reflecting those factors into its own quality management system.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić, Ivan-Damir Anić, Sunčana Piri Rajh, Edo Rajh and Nataša Kurnoga

This paper aims to explore buying decision factors and approaches of companies operating in manufacturing industry in Croatia.

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1386

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore buying decision factors and approaches of companies operating in manufacturing industry in Croatia.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collected by company survey were analysed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, cluster analysis and cross-tabulation analysis.

Findings

Results show that manufacturers are influenced by six distinctive factors when making purchasing decisions. These are supplier’s flexibility, supplier’s reliability, interdepartmental communication, top management support, routine purchases and buyer’s price sensitivity. Manufacturers can be classified in four different groups according to their buying decision-making patterns.

Practical implications

This paper provides a set of factors and approaches which might help selling companies and sales representatives understand the purchasing practices of buying company better, and develop adaptive selling approaches accordingly.

Originality/value

Based on a literature review and field research, an instrument of organizational buying behaviour was developed and tested in the Croatian manufacturing industry. The factors of organizational buying behaviour patterns were identified, and the typology of buying decision approaches applicable for manufacturing industry was developed.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Anchal Arora, Nishu Rani, Chandrika Devi and Sanjay Gupta

Organic food market has grown rapidly on a global level and so is the interest of customers. The present paper ranks the factors and sub-criteria which are taken into…

Abstract

Purpose

Organic food market has grown rapidly on a global level and so is the interest of customers. The present paper ranks the factors and sub-criteria which are taken into consideration while making organic purchase decisions resulting in understanding the behaviour of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper considered a sample of 550 respondents in the area of Punjab. Fuzzy AHP technique was applied to understand the key factors and sub-criteria which play a major role in organic food purchase decisions. The paper is empirical and descriptive in nature. The factors considered for the study include price, consumer knowledge, trust, attitude, behavioural intentions, subjective norms, perceived personal relevance and perceived consumer effectiveness.

Findings

The three major influential factors include price, trust and attitude ranked in the same order of preference which majorly affects the purchase decisions and talking about sub-criteria the three major criteria to purchase organic food include: “Price plays a significant role in purchase decisions (P2)”, “Organic food keeps me fit and healthy (A1)” and “Organic food intake makes me feel energetic (A2)”.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper is limited to the area of Punjab and majorly eight factors have been taken into consideration. Further research can be explored on broader geographical and cultural areas with new dimensions in criteria and sub-criteria.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will surely help the marketers to understand the behavioural intentions and preferences of the customers. Accordingly, they will strategize the policies to convert organic food market into a niche market with a high growth rate.

Originality/value

The existing literature explored various key factors. However, the present study comes up with ranking to the factors according to their priority in purchase decisions. This will definitely help marketers, business houses, practitioners and academicians about the key factors which affect purchase decisions, and it will surely add incredible knowledge into the existing database.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Matthew Ginder, Aslihan D. Spaulding, Kerry W. Tudor and J. Randy Winter

The purpose of this paper is to determine which factors are most influential to farmers' crop insurance purchasing decisions in northern Illinois.

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1456

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine which factors are most influential to farmers' crop insurance purchasing decisions in northern Illinois.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey method was used to collect information from farmers in a 42 county region of Illinois.

Findings

Of the factors analyzed, price had the most significant effect on crop insurance purchase decisions. While acres farmed had statistically significant impact on most of the crop insurance purchase decisions, different factors played a role in purchase decisions based on types of insurance and types of crops covered.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study warrant additional research relative to crop insurance purchase decisions. Analyzing the affect of varying degrees of government subsidization across crop insurance plans and coverage levels on purchase decisions is recommended. Questions regarding the relationship between crop insurance subsidization, farm program payments, and ad hoc disaster payments would be relevant in light of World Trade Organization and federal budget discussions. Also, asking participants to indicate if they have a written grain marketing plan and if that plan leverages crop insurance coverage to support forward contracting or pre‐harvest pricing would provide additional insights in determining how crop insurance purchase decisions are made. Questions regarding the claims process should be incorporated into future studies on this topic. The timeliness of claims payments, as well as the farmer's level of satisfaction with the claims adjustor and claims process may factor into the decision‐making process.

Practical implications

Illinois farmers and crop insurance agencies could benefit from this study. Findings could improve the crop insurance products and services available to Illinois farmers and make the federal crop insurance program more effective in enhancing farmers' ability to manage crop production risk.

Originality/value

This paper identified the factors that are most influential to farmers' crop insurance purchasing decisions in northern Illinois.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2018

Addie Martindale and Ellen McKinney

The purpose of this paper is to explore garment consumption decision processes of female consumers when they have the option to sew or purchase their clothing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore garment consumption decision processes of female consumers when they have the option to sew or purchase their clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research study presents a segment of the findings from a larger qualitative grounded theory study on women who choose to sew clothing for themselves (Martindale, 2017). This research analyzed the interview data pertaining to the unique sew or purchase decision-making process in which these consumers undertake as well as the related control over ready-to-wear consumption that sewing provides them.

Findings

The ability to sew resulted in a unique consumer decision-making process in regard to the clothing purchases due to the control it provided them over their ready-to-wear consumption. The women developed factors that they used to make the decision to sew or purchase. Over all the ability to sew provided them the option to sew or purchase clothing, allowing the women more control over their clothing selection specifically in regard to the garments body fit.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to English-speaking women living in the North America. The qualitative data collected are specific to this sample which cannot be generalized to all female home sewers. Research involving a larger population of women from a larger geographic area is needed.

Practical implications

The newly developed sew or purchase model provides an understanding of the control that having the option to sew or purchase provides female consumers. The findings offer apparel industry professionals a new perspective on ready-to-wear consumer dissatisfaction. The investment that is made when a garment is sewn instead of purchased has the potential to increase wardrobe sustainability as the consumer experiences more attachment to the clothing they have made. The model serves a starting point for further exploration into other craft-related consumer decision behaviors.

Originality/value

Purchasing decisions of this nature have yet to be considered in published research. Exploring these women’s decisions who operate outside of typical consumer culture and developing a model for this consumer behavior explains a phenomenon not yet addressed by existing consumer consumption research.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Catherine Rickwood and Lesley White

This purpose of this paper is to respond to calls for further research into consumer pre‐purchase decision‐making, and investigate the factors that cause a customer to…

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5849

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to respond to calls for further research into consumer pre‐purchase decision‐making, and investigate the factors that cause a customer to make a decision to save for retirement.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory research using eight focus groups was undertaken in Sydney, Australia with a total of 55 participants. The data were analysed using the approach suggested by Cresswell and includes coding into chunks, development of themes, interpreting, and validating findings.

Findings

Three key findings emerged from the research. First, there are certain internal, external, and risk factors that have a major impact on propensity to save for retirement. These are: involvement level, motivation, needs and wants, family influence, marketer influence, competitive options, financial risk, functional risk, and psychological risk. Second, no clear and universal gender differences in the pre‐purchase decision‐making process emerged during the focus group discussions. Finally, alternative options for spending and addressing risk negatively influence pre‐purchase decision‐making and therefore the desire or ability to save.

Research limitations/implications

This study is constrained by its exploratory nature. Consequently, future research could utilise quantitative methodology to confirm findings and allow generalisation of results. Also, a study incorporating ethnicity would add breadth to the findings.

Practical implications

Managers and policy makers benefit from understanding that marriage and turning 40 years old are highly influential to a consumer's likelihood to save for their retirement. This information is particularly useful for the development of marketing and communication campaigns.

Originality/value

This is the first exploratory study of pre‐purchase decision‐making which researches the triggers for buying complex financial services associated with saving for retirement.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Paurav Shukla

The consumer culture in recent times has evolved into one of the most powerful ingredients shaping individuals and societies. Although the behavioural intentions and…

Downloads
15396

Abstract

Purpose

The consumer culture in recent times has evolved into one of the most powerful ingredients shaping individuals and societies. Although the behavioural intentions and purchase decisions related models continue to dominate research and managerial practice, a deeper look indicates that most studies do not take the complete picture in account and study parts of the above mentioned phenomena. Furthermore, consumers operate in a dynamic and ever‐changing environment which in itself demands a re‐examination of their behavioural intentions and purchase decision influences from time to time. This paper aims to focus on these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the context of the young adults market, this study looks into how contextual factors vis‐à‐vis loyalty and switching impact consumer purchase intentions. The study involved both qualitative and quantitative research methodology.

Findings

The findings suggest that contextual factors have the strongest influence on purchase decisions. Furthermore, contextual factors influence the brand loyalty and switching behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings provide important insights with regards to the factors on which practitioners should focus to better tailor their content and approaches.

Originality/value

The study supplies unique learning to managers and researchers alike, through conceptualising and subsequently empirically verifying the issue of purchase decision, brand loyalty and switching with regard to contextual factors.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Jane Lu Hsu, Charlene W. Shiue and Kelsey J.-R. Hung

The purpose of this paper is to reveal influential information used in vegetable purchasing decisions of household primary food shoppers in China and in Taiwan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal influential information used in vegetable purchasing decisions of household primary food shoppers in China and in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Two in-person surveys were administrated separately in Shanghai, China and in Taipei, Taiwan, the two most populous metropolitan areas in China and in Taiwan, respectively.

Findings

Results reveal that about 32 per cent of respondents in Taipei purchase vegetables once in every two to three days. The majority of respondents in Shanghai (81 per cent) purchase vegetables on a daily basis. Results of factor analysis reveal the four dimensions, origin labelling, promotion, selection, and quality, influence purchasing decisions of respondents in Taipei and in Shanghai. For household primary food shoppers in Taipei, origin labelling and selection help food shoppers in Taipei in vegetable purchasing decisions, but not promotion. For those food shoppers in Shanghai who purchase large volume of vegetables, quality is the most important factor in purchasing decisions.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into vegetable purchasing decisions in two populous cities in China and Taiwan. The contributions of this study are to provide valuable information in vegetable purchasing decisions for effective information communication in retailing; and to fill in the gap of research in vegetable purchasing decisions in consumer behaviour studies in Chinese societies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Sujin Song and Myongjee Yoo

– The purpose of this paper is to examine whether social media may impact a customer’s purchasing decision during the pre-purchase stage of service consumption.

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5571

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether social media may impact a customer’s purchasing decision during the pre-purchase stage of service consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This study implemented a primary field survey design and developed an online self-administered questionnaire. A total of 285 usable questionnaires were collected. Factor analysis was performed to condense the large set of independent variables, and multiple regression analysis was performed to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that the benefits of social media do have a positive relation with customers purchase decision, but not all items are crucial to a similar extent. Functional (convenience, efficiency, information, sharing experiences) and monetary (free coupons, price discounts, special deals) benefits from social media were found to have a positive impact on customers’ purchase decision (H1, H2), while socio-psychological benefits were found to have no relationship with customers’ decision (H4). Still, hedonic benefits (amusement, enjoyment, entertainment, fun) were found to have a relationship with purchase decision (H3).

Originality/value

While social media received much attention in research due to its rapid development and its popularity, there are still limited studies that investigated the effect of social media during the pre-purchasing stage. Findings of this study are expected to contribute to the growing body of hospitality research on social media. Additionally, this research is expected to assist hospitality businesses to understand customers’ behavior regards to social media and develop appropriate marketing strategies.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1979

Gordon R. Foxall

Demonstrates that farmers, in their tractor‐buying decisions, have similar behaviour to professional buyers in manufacturing industries. Uses evidence collated from a…

Abstract

Demonstrates that farmers, in their tractor‐buying decisions, have similar behaviour to professional buyers in manufacturing industries. Uses evidence collated from a survey concerned with identifying farmers' perceptions of the social and economic factors affecting their decisions. Draws attention to the patterns of interpersonal communication accompanying farmers' purchases and the complexity of opinion leader influences.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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