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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2023

Pulkit Mathur and Anjani Bakshi

The purpose of this study is to collect and assess the evidence available on the effect of non nutritive sweeteners on appetite, weight and glycemic regulation. As a replacement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to collect and assess the evidence available on the effect of non nutritive sweeteners on appetite, weight and glycemic regulation. As a replacement for sugars, non-nutritive sweeteners (NNSs) are widely being used in different food products with the assumption that these would lower calorie intake and help to manage weight and blood sugar levels better. However, studies using animal models have reported that chronic exposure to NNSs leads to increased food consumption, weight gain and insulin resistance.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence was acquired from systematic reviews or meta-analyses (2016–2021) of relevant clinical studies, especially randomized control trials using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines.

Findings

The review showed NNSs exposure did not conclusively induce increased food intake or change in subjective appetite ratings. Appetite biomarkers like ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, C-peptide levels and Peptide YY remained mostly unaffected by NNSs. Meta-analyses of human randomized control studies showed a reduced energy intake and body weight. No significant change was seen in blood glucose levels, post-prandial glycemic or insulin response after consumption of NNSs. Adequate evidence is not available to conclusively say that NNSs influence gut health at doses relevant to human use.

Research limitations/implications

Most studies which are prospective cohort, observational and cross-sectional studies suggest that use of NNSs may promote obesity and metabolic syndrome in adults. Such studies are plagued by confounding variables and reverse causation. Mechanistic evidence is mostly based on in-vitro and in-vivo studies. The same causal pathways may not be operative or relevant in humans.

Practical implications

This review of available literature concludes that to achieve specific public health and clinical goals, the safe use of NNSs for the reduction of intakes of free sugars and energy should be explored. This would be possible by educating the consumer about energy compensation and understanding the nutritional content of artificially sweetened products in terms of calories coming from fat and complex carbohydrates used in the product.

Originality/value

This study was, thus, designed with the objective of examining the usefulness of NNSs in human population, especially with respect to insulin regulation, glycemic control and weight management. Well-designed randomized control trials which control for confounding variables are needed to generate high quality evidence.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Sunaina Thakur and Pulkit Mathur

Unsafe food can lead to various foodborne diseases and even death, especially among children. This paper aims to assess food safety knowledge and changes in practices and concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

Unsafe food can lead to various foodborne diseases and even death, especially among children. This paper aims to assess food safety knowledge and changes in practices and concerns among adults ≥ 18 years during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted among 325 adults living in Northern India. Demographic data and information regarding their knowledge, practices and concerns about various food safety issues were collected to see if there were any changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

The results showed that the participants had slightly higher than average knowledge and good food safety practices with mean scores of 9.75 ± 2.23 and 24.87 ± 2.28, respectively. Contracting COVID-19 from food and food packaging materials was of high concern for more than 70% of the participants. Majority (> 80%) of them reported an increase in the frequency of handwashing. About 16% of the participants used chemical disinfectants for washing fruits and vegetables. An increase (57.5%) in the frequency of food label reading was also noted during the pandemic. Freshness and the general quality of food items (49.5%), safety of food (30.8%) and cost (18.2%) were the top drivers that influenced the purchase decision.

Originality/value

This study highlighted the need to send out clear messages on safe food handling practices and keeping the tempo up for sustaining good hygienic practices. This will help in reducing the risk of foodborne diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 6 February 2018

Peeyush Pandey and Tuhin Sengupta

The subject areas are Operations Management, Operations Research, Transportation and Logistics.

Abstract

Subject area

The subject areas are Operations Management, Operations Research, Transportation and Logistics.

Study level/applicability

The following courses (MBA/Post Graduate level) can use the case as part of their teaching material: Applied Forecasting Techniques; Optimization Methods; Operations Research.

Case overview

The case details a problem faced by the Gokuldhaam Society. The society was located a great distance from the city, as the majority of the residents who live in the society work in the nearby industrial area. To cater to the daily needs of residents, the society has shuttle buses plying to and from the city at different times during the day. However, due to operational inefficiencies, the administration faced excessive transportation costs. Looking for advice in this regard, the chairman of the society contacted the Head of Department at Operations Management, Indira Institute of Management, Indore hoping to find a way to reduce some of the operational costs.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to make the students apply two different stationary time series forecasting techniques to a real-life problem and data set; to make the students carefully choose a specific trend-based time series forecasting technique due to the inherent constraints in the availability of data set; and to make students appreciate the importance of application of linear programming in a time series problem.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 9 Operations and logistics

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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